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Full text of "Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare. Massachusetts. 1929-34"

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Public Document No. 17 

Wc\t (Eommomimtiilj of Utesarfjitartta 
ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT 

OF 

Public Welfare 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1929 







Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
3M 6-' 30 Order 9253 



iuOL 



STATE .HOUSE, BOSTON 



36/^3 



Resolutions Adopted by the Advisory Board of the 
Department of Public Welfare on the death of 

GEORGE H. McCLEAN 

George H. McClean, of Springfield, a member of this Board since December 10, 
1919, passed away at his home, on September 19, 1929. 

We have been in a position to know his unselfish devotion to the work of the 
Department during these ten years and his genuine interest in the people for whose 
benefit the Department exists. But most of all, we have realized his unusual 
spirit of friendliness which went to make up his fine character. 

Be it RESOLVED then that the several members of this Board, whose names 
are signed below, record their appreciation of the association which they have 
had with him, and on behalf of the Commonwealth record their gratitude for his 
public service, and we direct the Commissioner of the Department to send to Mrs. 
McClean and her family this expression of great sympathy for their loss and our 
assurances that we shall not forget his friendliness and his service. 

A. C. Ratshesky, 
Jeffrey R. Brackett, 
George Crompton, 
Ada Eliot Sheffield, 
Mary P. H. Sherburne, 
Richard K. Conant. 



GHfje Commcmtoealrt) of Jfflasteacfjusette 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Richard K. Conant, Commissioner. 

To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives: 

The Tenth Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare, covering the 
year from December 1, 1928, to November 30, 1929, is herewith respectfully 
presented. 

Members of the Advisory Board of the Department of Public Welfare. 

Date of Original Date of 

Appointment Name Residence Expiration 

December 10, 1919 A. C. Ratshesky Boston . . 

December 10, 1919 Jeffrey R. Brackett Boston . . 

December 10, 1919 George Crompton Worcester . 

December 10, 1919 *George H. McClean Springfield . 

December 10, 1919 Mrs. Ada Eliot Sheffield .... Cambridge 

Decemb r 10, 1919 Mrs. Mary P. H. Sherburne . . . Brookline . 

October 9, 1929 John J. O'Connor Holyoke 



December 10, 1931 

December 10, 1931 

December 10, 1930 

September 19, 1929 

December 10, 1932 

December 10, 1932 

December 10, 1930 



Divisions of the Department of Public Welfare. 

Boston. 

Division of Aid and Relief: Room 30, State House 
Frank W. Goodhue, Director 
Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor of Social Service 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor of Mothers' Aid 
Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor of Settlements 

Division of Child Guardianship: Room 43, State House 
Miss Winifred A. Keneran, Director 

Division of Juvenile Training: 41 Mt. Vernon Street 
Charles M. Davenport, Director 
Robert J. Watson, Executive Secretary 
Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent, Girls' Parole Branch 
John J. Smith, Superintendent, Boys' Parole Branch 

Subdivision of Private Incorporated Charities: Room 37, State House 
Miss Caroline J. Cook, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Miss Florence G. Dickson, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Miss Alice M. Mclntire, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 

Subdivision of Housing and Town Planning: Room 37, State House 
Edward T. Hartman, Visitor to City and Town Planning Boards 

Supervision of Boarding Homes for the Aged and Infirmaries: Room 37, 
State House 
Francis Bardwell, Supervising Inspector of Infirmaries 

Institutions under the Supervision of the Department of Public Welfare. 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury. John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton. John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. Charles A. Keeler, Superintendent 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. George P. Campbell, Superintendent 

Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. Miss Catharine M. Campbell, Superin- 
tendent 

* Deceased. 



Pt. I. 3 

Part I. 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

The Department of Public Welfare has expended this year $5,600,000 in service 
to over 70,000 persons. The great encouragement to our work this year has been 
the progressive program of Governor Allen, which was introduced with the sen- 
tences, "The end of government is the achievement of satisfaction and happiness 
by our people. No group can be happy in the presence of misery, or suffering, 
or poverty." 

The care of aged persons is one of the most important problems with which we 
are concerned. New legislation enacted this year, which requires boarding homes 
for aged persons to be licensed by us, has been put into effect. Already twenty- 
five boarding homes have been licensed and one hundred fifty-nine more have 
filed applications. Such supervision over the private care of aged persons is 
necessary in addition to public care. We hope that it will prevent such disasters 
as occurred last year, when twenty elderly people in a private home in Dedham 
were left stranded as a result of the bankruptcy of the proprietor. We hope by 
co-operation with the building inspection authorities to guard against any fire 
hazard which may exist, as we do in our inspection of homes for the aged main- 
tained by charitable corporations and as we do in our inspection of city and town 
infirmaries. The law enables us to require security whenever a contract for life 
care of an aged person is made. 

The Governor's address looked forward to more adequate institutional care for 
aged persons who need the required hospital treatment, and particularly to more 
adequate aid by public authorities to aged persons in their own homes. This 
state and Rhode Island are the only two states which maintain state infirmaries. 
At our excellent institution at Tewksbury $995,349 has been expended this year 
for the care of 2,500 persons. Most of the patients are chronic sick and very many 
of them are of advanced age. The standards of care at that institution have again 
been improved this year, with better service, better food and enlargements of the 
wards. At the seventy-fifth anniversary of the State Infirmary on May 1st of 
this year, a new building for the care of two hundred men was opened. 

At the same time we are encouraging city and town homes (which are being 
changed over from almshouses to infirmaries in fact as well as in name) to meet 
the great need for care for elderly chronic sick patients. Cambridge, Haverhill, 
Brockton, Leominster, Barnstable and Waltham have recently added materially 
to the bed capacity of their infirmaries, using suitable hospital construction, and 
other cities are at work upon this problem. These institutions are no longer used 
in Massachusetts as almshouses to which aged people are sent merely because 
they are poor. They are reserved for chronic sick patients who need hospital care, 
and such aged people as can be aided in their own homes are given assistance there. 

To raise the standard of adequacy in this form of aid we have set the example" 
to the cities and towns by giving more adequately in the state cases where we have 
the power to direct the amount, and the cities and towns are as fast and as gener- 
ously as their circumstances will permit increasing the amount of assistance to 
aged persons. Our expenditures for Temporary Aid reflect this situation. A 
large proportion of this appropriation is spent for the care of aged persons and 
the entire appropriation has increased from $650,000, in 1926, to $1,034,000, in 
1929. 

The survey of crippled children, recommended in the Governor's program, is 
being successfully carried on. With the funds made available we are engaged on 
the plan of visiting every crippled child in the state, having a trained orthopedic 
nurse get the facts which will enable us to report accurately how many are suffer- 
ing from lack of adequate treatment or education, and to report what, if anything, 
needs to be done in the way of additional care and treatment. The care and 
treatment which is given at the State Hospital for Crippled Children at Canton is 
excellent. Massachusetts is very well equipped with private hospitals and schools 
for crippled children. Its school systems are beginning to provide special educa- 
tion, and it is probable that there is no necessity here for the building of additional 
institutions. The survey, however, is revealing many cases where more adequate 
use of the facilities is possible. 



4 P.D. 17. 

The number of children under the care of the Division of Child Guardian-hip 
has increased during the year from 5,807 to 6,135, and the expenditure for the 
year was $1,415,811. This is a very large number of children to be provided with 
foster homes. Institutions are used only for the care of delinquent children, and 
the three excellent training schools, the Lyman School for Boys at Westborough, 
the Industrial School for Boys at Shirley, and the Industrial School for Girls at 
Lancaster, continue to be well managed under the care of their Board of Trus- 
tees. Progress has been made at these schools, as a result of the psychiatric ex- 
aminations which have been set up. Building developments include a new cot- 
tage for seventy-five boys at the Lyman School, an addition to the infirmary at 
the Industrial School for Girls, and an addition to the shop building at the In- 
dustrial School for Boys. 

The laws relating to dependent, neglected and delinquent children and other 
children in need of special care are being thoroughly studied and revised by the 
Child Welfare Commission, which was another important part of the Governor's 
program. 

A new maternity hospital at the State Infirmary was authorized this year and 
plans for it have been completed. 

The training course which was established three years ago continues to be suc- 
cessful this year. Thirty-six workers employed by local boards and private agencies 
are enrolled. 

Five new planning boards have been established and two new places zoned, and 
this activity has been stimulated by our Division of Town Planning. There are 
now one hundred twelve planning boards and sixty-five zoned places in the state. 

The successful operation of public welfare work requires the service of skilled 
workers to make thorough investigations and to plan for each child and family 
under care. As a result of the increased salary ranges we have been able this 
year to secure and hold trained workers. Only in this way is it possible to improve 
the underlying conditions in the families with which we deal and to make our 
work as much as possible preventive of miserjr and suffering in the next generation 

DUTIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

The State Department of Public Welfare has the following principal duties: 

1. Supervision over the five state institutions of the Department: 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury. 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton. 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. 
State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. 

2. Direction of public relief, both indoor and outdoor, given to unsettled persons 

by cities and towns. 

3. Supervision of mothers' aid rendered by cities and towns. 

4. Care and maintenance of delinquent, neglected and dependent children coming 

into the custody of the Department through court commitment or otherwise. 

5. Institutional custody and treatment of juvenile offenders committed by the 

courts to the three State Training Schools, and the care of these children in 
families when on parole. 

6. General supervision of the work of the city and town Planning Boards. 

7. Visitation and inspection of private incorporated charitable agencies; investiga- 

tion of petitions for the incorporation of private charities; and the require- 
ment and reception of annual returns from them. 

Among the other supervisory and inspectional duties of the Department may be 
mentioned the following: 

1. Visitation and inspection of city and town infirmaries. 

2. Visitation and inspection of the five county training schools. 

3. Visitation and investigation of care given to all children supported by the 

several cities and towns. 

4. Visitation and investigation of care given to all adults supported in families, 

other than their own, by cities and towns. 



Pt.L 5 

5. Reception and classification of the annual returns of cities and towns relative 

to poor persons supported and relieved and the cost thereof. 

6. Visitation and inspection of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses. 

7. Investigation of legal settlement of persons, possibly State charges, who have 

been supported, relieved or buried by cities and towns, and of sane inmates of 
State institutions. 

8. Sending poor persons to the places within and without the Commonwealth 

where they belong. 

9. Execution of the laws concerning infants and the licensing of infant boarding 

houses. 

10. Licensing maternity hospitals. 

11. Licensing boarding homes for the aged. 

RICHARD K. CONANT, 
Commissioner of Public Welfare. 

DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 

Frank W. Goodhue, Director. 

Subdivision of Settlements. 

Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor. 

The subdivision of settlements investigates the legal settlement of all persons 
officially called to the attention of the division by the boards of public welfare and 
boards of health; investigates the settlement of patients admitted to the State 
Infirmary, State Farm (infirmary department), state sanatoria and the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital School; and supervises public relief rendered in homes and hos- 
pitals by cities and towns to persons without legal settlement. The subdivision 
also discharges inmates of the State Farm (infirmary department), visits poor per- 
sons supported by cities and towns in families, and investigates, upon request of 
the Division of Vocational Education, the circumstances of persons receiving vo- 
cational training, who apply for aid during rehabilitation. 

The following table is a summary of the work done during the year in the ex- 
amination and investigation of settlements of inmates of the state institutions: 









Settle- 


No 


Orders 


Total 




Examina- 


Orders 


ments 


Settle- 


With- 


Cases 


Institutions 


tions 


Issued 


Found 


ments 


drawn 


Returned 


State Infirmary 


2,654 


751 


530 


119 


40 


689 


State Farm . . 


55 


32 


31 


3 


2 


36 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


173 


143 


142 


14 


— 


156 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


193 


169 


146 


18 


- 


164 


Rutland State Sanatorium . • 


151 


125 


114 


24 


— 


138 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


276 


221 


203 


22 


_ 


225 


Massachusetts Hospital School 


68 


68 


54 


12 


- 


66 


Totals .... 


3,570 


1,509 


1,220 


212 


42 


1,474 


Cases pending 


Nov. 30 . 






1928, 350 






Cases pending 


Nov. 30 . 






1929, 385 







Temporary Aid (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 18, as amended by ch. 221, Acts of 
1924). — Cities and towns are authorized by statute to furnish adequate assistance 
to poor persons having no lawful settlements, if so ordered by the Department of 
Public Welfare. 

On December 1, 1928, there were 2,483 continued cases including 8,373 persons, 
and during the year 4,951 notices were received from 226 cities and towns con- 
cerning 19,644 persons. 



P.D. 17. 







c 


auses 


of Aid. 










1927 


1928 


1929 




1927 


1928 


1929 


Illness 
Desertion 
Widowhood 
Old Age . 
Unemployment 
Insufficient income . 
Husband in correctic 
institution . 


. 1,153 

364 

232 

81 

. 1,981 

486 

nal 

190 


1,082 
300 
237 

105 

2,844 
522 

206 


1,128 
343 
203 
134 

2,327 

487 

200 


Orphans 
Insanity 
Blindness 
Non-support . 
Miscellaneous . 

Totals 


15 
26 
12 
73 

4 


17 
23 
13 
95 

7 


16 
13 
12 

84 
4 


. 4,617 


5,451 


4,951 



The amounts annually appropriated by the Legislature are necessarily for cur- 
rent and previous years. The following tabulation shows the actual amounts re- 
imbursed for aid rendered by cities and towns during the years designated: 



Year 



1912 . 

1913 . 

1914 . 

1915 . 

1916 . 

1917 . 

1918 . 

1919 . 

1920 . 

1921 . 

1922 . 

1923 . 

1924 . 

1925 . 

1926 . 

1927 (January 1 to June 30) 
1927-28 (July 1 to June 30) 





Number of 




Number of 


Persons in 


Amounts 


Cases 


Families 


Reimbursed 


2,847 


12,339 


$48,192 85 


3,131 


13,434 


63,203 05 


4,848 


20,714 


108,337 29 


7,305 


32,056 


178,762 28 


5,165 


21,043 


159,205 53 


5,664 


22,258 


227,831 59 


4,358 


17,701 


261,217 44 


3,756 


15,668 


311,148 30 


3,223 


13,313 


334,565 05 


8,093 


32,372 


635,585 63 


6,472 


29,124 


586,296 43 


4,320 


19,370 


432,283 20 


5,765 


27,279 


642,336 34 


6,182 


28,429 


660,504 49 


5,584 


25,720 


621,558 21 


4,118 


18,611 


397,183 56 


6,406 


30,428 


876,519 81 



Chapter 241 of the Acts of 1926 provides that claims against the Commonwealth shall be rendered to 
the department on or before the first day of October annually, and shall be for the twelve months ending 
on the thirtieth day of June preceding. 

Shipwrecked Seamen (General Laws, ch. 102, sect. 5). — During the year two 
notices were received, one each from Truro and New Bedford, which included 2 
persons. 

Sick State Poor (General Laws, ch. 122, sect. 17, 18). — The sick law provides 
that no person shall be sent to the State Infirmary whose health would be endan- 
gered by removal. 

Cities and towns are reimbursed for the support of persons having no legal settle- 
ment who are ill in their homes or in public or privately controlled hospitals, in- 
firmaries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb, or blind, provided such persons are 
not in suitable condition for removal to the State Infirmary when applying for 
assistance. 

On December 1, 1928, there were 265 continued cases, and during the year 
notices were received from 140 cities and towns concerning 6,155 persons repre- 
sented as too ill to be removed. 

Dangerous Diseases (General Laws, ch. Ill, sect. 116). — The law provides that 
a board of health shall retain charge, to the exclusion of the board of public welfare, 
of any person ill with a disease defined by the Department of Public Health as 
dangerous to the public health. 

If any member of a family is ill with a disease declared dangerous to the public 
health, the aid required by the other members of the family is furnished by the 
board of public welfare, unless the family is quarantined as provided in chapter 111, 
section 95, General Laws, in which event the board of health furnishes all aid re- 
quired. In hospital cases, reimbursement by the Commonwealth is governed by 
the provisions of chapter 122, section 18, General Laws. 

On December 1, 1928, there were 265 continued cases, and during the year notices 
were received from boards of health of 85 cities and towns concerning 1,674 per- 
sons ill with diseases declared dangerous to the public health. 

Wife Settlement (General Laws, ch. 122, sect. 12). — The law provides that "If 
a man who has no legal settlement and is in need of aid has a wife who is receiving 



Pt. I. 7 

aid and who has a legal settlement in the Commonwealth, he shall be supported 
by the town where his wife has her settlement." 

On December 1, 1928, there were 137 continued cases, and during the year 458 
notices were received from 60 cities and towns. 

Burials (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 17, as amended by chapter 298, Acts of 
1923). — The law provides that if the expense of burial is not paid by kindred, 
"An amount not exceeding $40 for the funeral expenses of each person over 12 
years of age, and not exceeding $20 for the funeral expenses of each person under 
that age, shall be paid by the Commonwealth; provided that the board of public 
welfare shall file with each claim an affidavit of the undertaker stating the total 
amount of his bill, the amount received from the town, and the amount received 
from all other sources, and provided, further, that if the total expense of the burial, 
by whomsoever incurred, shall exceed the sum of $100 no payment therefor shall 
be made by the Commonwealth." 

The number of burial claims received during the year was 295 from 60 cities 
and towns. 

Vocational Education (General Laws, ch. 74, sect. 22B). — The law provides 
that the Department of Public Welfare shall, upon request of the State Board of 
Vocational Education, make an investigation of the circumstances of persons ac- 
tually in training afforded by said board, who apply for aid during rehabilitation, 
and shall make a report of its finding to said board. 

During the year 7 applications were received and investigated, 6 of which were 
approved. 

Audit. — The number, amount, and allowance of the bills examined on account 
of cases of temporary aid, sick state poor, dangerous diseases, wife-settlement, 
burial, and mothers with dependent children are shown in the following tabulation. 
It is to be noted that the total shown in this table may vary somewhat from the 
total paid out of the treasury during the fiscal year from the appropriation in ques- 
tion. This possible variance arises from the fact that bills audited by this depart- 
ment are in some cases not actually paid during the year for which the audit is 
shown. For actual expenditures from these respective appropriations see page 58. 

Classes of Cases 
Temporary Aid 
Sick State Poor 
• Dangerous Diseases 
Wife-Settlement 
Burial ..... 
Mothers with Dependent Children 



Bills 


Claim? 


i 


Allowances 


Deductions 


5,715 


$997,298 


70 


$891,998 04 


$105,300 


66 


3,638 


97,887 


81 


77,555 74 


20,332 


U7 


1,421 


112,417 


35 


98,467 38 


13,949 


97 


429 


15,264 


83 


13,116 92 


2,147 


91 


328 


9,504 


65 


8,033 89 


1,470 


76 


3,430 


874,832 


64 


830,723 24 


44,109 


40 


14,961 


$2,107,205 98 


$1,919,895 21 


$187,310 


77 



Removals. — The department is charged with the duty of removing sane poor 
persons to cities and towns within the Commonwealth, or, when not belonging in 
Massachusetts, to the state or place where they belong. The following table 
shows the removals made during the year: 



To other countries . 

To other states 

To towns of residence 



1927 


1928 


1929 


79 

194 

1,357 


57 

212 

1,343 


45 

203 

1,153 



1,630 



1,612 



1,401 



Supervision of Wayfarers' Lodges and Cheap Lodging Houses. 

There has been much unemployment during the past year. What effect, if 
any, this has had on the population of the cheap lodging houses can be gathered 
from the figures below. 

1927 1928 1929 



Municipal: Boston Wayfarers' Lodge 
Charitable . . . . . 

Commercial: One of the older houses 



26,796 
40,397 
29,674 



35,308 
38,717 
32,150 



28,466 
38,694 
30,551 



8 P.D. 17. 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid. 

(General Laws, Chapter 118.) 

Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor. 

Statistics. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year, on December 1, 1928, there were 2,602 mothers 

with 7,648 dependent children under fourteen years of age receiving Mothers' Aid. 

They were classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

395 mothers with 1,033 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 

2,207 mothers with 6,615 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 

2,030 mothers with 5,865 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

572 mothers with 1,783 dependent children. 
Note. — The 572 living husbands classified as follows: 
286 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
71 were insane, and 
215 had chronic illness. _ Of these 
95 had tuberculosis and 
120 had diseases other than tubercidosis. 
. 209 were deserting husbands. 

39 were divorced or legally separated. 
38 were in jail. 

During the year 593 new cases were aided and 592 cases were closed, so that 
there were 2,603 mothers in receipt of Mothers' Aid at the close of the fiscal year 
(November 30, 1929). 

The new cases that were received during the fiscal year included 593 mothers 
with 2,008 dependent children, and were classified as follows : 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement : 

78 mothers with 249 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 

515 mothers with 1,759 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 

422 mothers with 1,444 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

171 mothers with 564 dependent children. 
Note. — The 171 living husbands classified as follows: 
87 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
27 were insane and 
60 had chronic illness. Of these 
35 had tuberculosis and 
25 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
52 were deserting husbands. 
13 were divorced or legally separated. 
19 were in jail. 

Factors in Dependency. 

Three (3) out of every four (4) mothers were aided because of the death of the 
father of the family. 

Nine (9) out of every ten (10) mothers were aided because of either the death or 
the chronic illness of the father. 

State Appropriations and Reimbursements for Mothers' Aid. 

Appropriations Reimbursements 

1913, to Nov. 30, 1914 $175,000 00 $174,999 36 

1914, to Nov. 30, 1915 250,000 00 249,999 62 

1915, to Nov. 30, 1916 300,000 00 299,998 78 

1916, to Nov. 30, 1917 400,000 00 399,999 79 

1917, to Nov. 30, 1918 . . . . . . 475,000 00 474.999 63 

1918, to Nov. 30, 1919 550,000 00 549,999 56 

1919, to Nov. 30, 1920 775,000 00 775,028 78 

1920, to Nov. 30, 1921 900,000 00 899,998 94 

1921, to Nov. 30, 1922 850,000 00 849,999 48 

1922, to Nov. 30, 1923 900,000 00 899,999 43 

1923, to Nov. 30, 1924 950,000 00 949,999 97 

1924, to Nov. 30, 1925 1,080,000 00 1,079,997 87 

1925, to Nov. 30, 1926 900,000 00 900,000 00 

1926, to Nov. 30, 1927 1 850,000 00 2 359,967 34 

1927, to Nov. 30, 1928 J 1,050,032 66 661,175 17 

1928, to Nov. 30, 1929 861,857 49 S30.723 24 



Sept. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 



1 Unexpended balance used for ensuing year. 

2 Affected by Chapter 241, Acts of 1926, which changed the period rendering claims against the Com- 
monwealth. 



Pt. I. 9 

The appropriation for Mothers' Aid has been approximately $900,000 per year 
for the past nine years. The number of cases aided has gradually decreased since 
the peak in 1919 but the high cost of living has more than offset the falling-off in 
numbers. According to the report of the Massachusetts Commission on the 
Necessaries of Life, it would take $1.60 to purchase necessities in 1930 which could 
be purchased in 1913 for $1.00. 

Number of Mothers' Aid Cases Active at End of Each Fiscal Year since the Enact- 
ment of the Law in 1913. 



1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 



2,334 


1922 


2,798 


1923 


3,035 


1924 


3,242 


1925 


3,366 


1926 


3,743 


1927 


3,330 


1928 


3,407 


1929 



3,371 
3,092 
2,900 
2,870 
2,633 
2,592 
2,602 
2,603 



Mothers' Aid Cases Active on November 30, 
1914-1929. 







































































4000 
3800 
3600 
3400 
3200 
3000 
2800 
2600 
2400 
2200 































































































































































































































































































































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Reasons for Closing Mothers' Aid Cases 
(during the year ending November 30, 1929). 

During the year five hundred ninety-two (592) Mothers' Aid cases were closed. 
I. Of these, three hundred seventy-six (376) had become self-supporting. _ 

279 had become self-supporting through the earnings of the older children. 
60 mothers had remarried, and so had provided for their children. 
37 fathers had recovered and returned to work. Many of these were tu- 
bercular men who had been discharged from sanitaria "able to work." 
The aid was not withdrawn immediately upon their discharge but op- 
portunity was given them to find suitable employment. Organized 
effort to find out-door or part-time work for such men would be of 
great help, as many men have difficulty in getting such work unaided. 
II. One hundred nineteen (119) were automatically closed. 

Sixteen (16) mothers died and two (2) were sent to State hospitals, one as 

insane and the other, tubercular. 
Five (5) mothers voluntarily withdrew their applications before aid was 
granted. Several thought they were applying for a "State pension" 



10 P.D. 17. 

and declined to accept public aid under the conditions imposed. One 
woman refused to give up male lodgers, and another woman who was 
a trained nurse insisted upon caring for patients in their homes, leav- 
ing her young children to the care of an inexperienced young girl for 
weeks at a time. 

Four (4) mothers who had been receiving Mothers' Aid broke up their homes. 
One mother with an only crippled child found institutional care for the 
child and worked to support herself, and several others placed their 
children in orphanages or .with relatives and worked full-time. 

Sixty (60) mothers moved out of the city or town where they had been re- 
ceiving Mothers' Aid. Many of these cases were reopened immediately 
in the city or town to which they moved, so that while aid was auto- 
matically closed in one town, it was immediately renewed in another. 
The mothers moved so as to be near relatives who could help with the 
care of the children, or to live with parents who could furnish free hous- 
ing or low rent. Some moved to be near places where the older chil- 
dren were working, or where there were better opportunities for work. 

Ten (10) cases were closed because the youngest child had become sixteen 
(16) years of age. 

Twenty-two (22) were transferred to some other form of aid, such as mili- 
tary aid for the widow of a Spanish war veteran, and temporary aid for 
several mothers who had not resided in Massachusetts for three years 
just prior to applying for aid. 

III. Twenty-five (25) mothers were found to be unfit. 

The birth of an illegitimate child after the death of her husband, or the 
arrest and conviction of a mother for habitual immorality or intoxica- 
tion, or for the illegal sale of liquor, larceny, or for the neglect of her 
children were the instances recorded. 

IV. Seventy-two (72) eases were closed for various other reasons. 

Nine (9) women, each of whom had only one dependent child were denied 
Mothers' Aid, because the mother by a reasonable change of plan 
could have become self-supporting. In several such cases the mother 
and child were both in good health, and the mother and child could 
have boarded with relatives. 

Seven (7) were closed by local boards when the youngest child became 
fourteen (14) years old, but in every one of these cases there were older 
children earning, with the mother's help, enough to support the family. 

Fifty-six (56) other cases were closed because they did not conform to the 
policies of the Department of Public Welfare. Some owned property 
of greater value than is allowed; some kept male lodgers; some ne- 
glected their homes in spite of frequent warnings and others had con- 
cealed assets in banks. Still others had received considerable sums of 
money in insurance or as settlement for injuries and had not acknowl- 
edged such assets. 

Duration of Mothers' Aid cases closed between December 1, 1928, and Novem- 
ber 30, 1929: 

Less than 1 year, 175. Less than 2 years, 75. Less than 3 years, 71. Less 
than 4 years, 39. Less than 5 years, 32. Less than 6 years, 33. Less than 7 
years, 29. Less than 8 years, 26. Less than 9 years, 18. Less than 10 years, 31. 
Less than 11 years, 30. Less than 12 years, 15. Less than 13 years, 8. Less than 
14 years, 8. Less than 15 years, 2. Total, 592. 



Pt. I. 11 

Distribution of Mothers' Aid Cases. 

The number of Mothers' Aid cases reported by the 39 cities on July 1, 1929, is 
as follows : 









Number 










Number 




of Active 


Popu- 


of Active 


Popu- 


City Cases 


lation 


City Cases 


lation 


Attic boro . 12 


20,623 


Melrose . . . • . 3 


20,165 


Beverly 






21 


22,685 


New Bedford 




61 


119,539 


Boston 






807 


779,620 


Newburyport 




6 


15,656 


Brockton 






31 


65,343 


Newton 




33 


53,003 


Cambridge . 






109 


119,669 


North Adams 




5 


22,717 


Chelsea 






43 


47,247 


Northampton 




8 


24,145 


Chicopee 






29 


41,882 


Peabody 




11 


19,870 


Everett 






30 


42,072 


Pittsfield 






8 


46,877 


Fall River . 






43 


128,993 


Quincy 






23 


60,055 


Fitchburg 






42 


43,609 


Revere 






28 


33,261 


Gardner 






4 


18,730 


Salem . 






37 


42,821 


Gloucester . 






11 


23,375 


Somerville 






50 


99,032 


Haverhill 






47 


49,232 


Springfield 






33 


142,065 


Holyoke 






27 


60,335 


Taunton 






15 


39,255 


Lawrence 






48 


93,527 


Waltham 






36 


34,746 


Leominster . 






10 


22,120 


Westfield 






6 


19,342 


Lowell 






148 


110,296 


Woburn 






16 


18,370 


Lynn . 






54 


103,081 


Worcester 






89 


190,757 


Maiden 






19 


51,789 












Marlborough 






8 


16,236 


Total number of cases in 




Medford 






23 


47,627 


cities 






2,034 





There were also 635 cases reported in 157 towns. 

The following case shows how our supervision operates: 

Mr. C, an Italian laborer, died in December, 1928, after three days' illness with 
pneumonia, leaving a widow thirty-three years old and seven children, the oldest, 
a girl of fourteen, and the youngest a baby ten months' old. The small insurance 
barely covered the hospital and funeral expenses so Mrs. C. applied for Mothers' 
Aid and the local board of public welfare gave her $20 a week. 

When the state visitor called, she found the family living in a four-room tene- 
ment on the third floor of an old wooden house. The entrance was through a 
cluttered alley opening off a busy street in a poor, congested neighborhood. The 
rent was $16 a month. There was no bathroom and the toilet used by two families 
was dark, opened directly off the hallway, and was poorly ventilated. There was 
a kitchen, a living room and two bedrooms. The mother and the seven children 
slept in two double beds and a crib. 

Mrs. C. was a small, dark, nervous woman with an ugly rash on her face. The 
children were undersized and puny. On the day of the state visitor's first call, 
Louisa, eleven years old, was at home sick. Mary, five years old, had a paralyzed 
right arm and hand, and was very lame as the result of infantile paralysis. She 
was receiving no medical attention and was not attending school. About a month 
before, Rocco, two years old, fell into a pail of boiling hot water with which four- 
teen-year-old Carmella was preparing to scrub the kitchen floor. He was at the 
hospital where extensive skin grafting was being done. 

There was no preparation for dinner, and Mrs. C. gave eight-year old Josephine 
five cents with which to buy "something to eat on the way to school." We told 
the local board that we could not approve this case unless a new plan was adopted. 

The local board was advised to move the family into a better house and neigh- 
borhood and to provide suitable beds and bedding; to have Mary examined and 
treated at the Children's Hospital clinic ; to secure a visiting housekeeper to teach 
Mrs. C. how to feed her family, and to give Mrs. C. more aid. The board bought 
a bed and bedding for Mrs. C. but followed none of the other suggestions. 

The state visitor called again at noon a week later and found that Mrs. C. was 
working in a rag shop. Three of the older children were at school, and three of 
the younger children were sitting on the doorstep waiting for them to return. A 
second letter was sent to the board calling attention to the neglect of the children. 

A week later the state visitor called at noon. Mrs. C. was still working. The 
three older children returned from school, found the key under the door mat and 
unlocked the kitchen door. The house was cluttered, the table and sink filled 
with dirty dishes. Although the weather was cold, there was no fire in the kitchen 
stove. Carmella, "the little mothei" of the family, took some money out of a 



12 P.D. 17. 

vase on the mantel and sent one of the children to buy a half-dozen eggs, which 
she intended to fry in some fat in a big frying-pan on the two-burner gas stove. 

Three of the youngest children were downstairs in the care of a young woman 
who had two young children of her own, and they were brought upstairs to share 
in the lunch that Carmella was preparing. 

We again wrote the local board refusing to approve this case. We believed 
that the board was giving a dole to this family of twenty dollars a week and we 
decided that it was a waste of money to allow such conditions to continue. 

Spurred into action by our refusal to aid, the board took action to remedy the 
conditions. The family was moved into a decent neighborhood and was provided 
with beds and bedding. Mrs. C. was warned to stay at home and take care of her 
children or forfeit her aid. Mary had died very suddenly. Rocco had returned 
from the hospital. The aid was increased to $25 a week and fuel. Carmella 
earns $4 a week and attends continuation school. There has been a decided im- 
provement in the standards of the family but we shall keep it under close super- 
vision. 

Subdivision of Social Service. 

Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor. 

Social Service was started at the State Infirmary nearly twenty years ago by 
one volunteer, Mrs. Ada Eliot Sheffield, a member of the Board, who wanted to 
know what happened to unmarried mothers and their babies when discharged. 
She found that they went wherever the} r could find shelter: to the Boston City 
Temporary Home, to former bad companions, to fathers of the babies, to poor 
relatives, and in many cases boarding or abandoning their babies as soon as pos- 
sible. After a six months' survey she persuaded the Board to place a social worker 
in the Maternity Ward. For four years social service confined its efforts to the 
Maternity Ward and to mothers admitted with their babies for convalescence. 
Then the service broadened to include all women with children, and in 1917 was 
extended to the girls and women infected with venereal diseases. At this time the 
staff included three paid workers, a part-time attorney, and two full-time volun- 
teers. Great credit must be given to volunteer service for the untiring efforts 
and enthusiasm in the continued development of this subdivision. 

In 1920 one worker began to assist old ladies and chronically sick patients. Not 
until this past year have we been able to give them full-time service. In 1923 a 
survey of a group of men was made, and in 1924 the Superintendent of the In- 
firmary asked that a worker be placed on the men's wards. State service grows 
slowly but surely. Now the staff consists of seven visitors, a supervisor, a part- 
time attorney, a transportation worker and three stenographers. 

Men. 

Of the men, those under forty-five are usually our greatest concern. If they 
have chronic disease they need much encouragement to face the future, and if 
they are temporarily sick and out of work they must find their way back to industry 
quickly or they become depressed and discouraged. Habits of idleness are insidi- 
ous and demoralizing. Throughout the winter a man visitor did much to keep 
the able-bodied men at work in the institution, and sent them out as soon as work 
was available. The friendly bedside visits to chronically sick patients, aged sick 
patients and other patients in the hospital wards are an important part of the 
service. 

A sixteen-year-old boy came suffering with asthma and a severe cough. Treat- 
ment at a sanatorium and at acute hospitals had given only temporary relief. He 
had no home and his two brothers were unable to help him except for occasional 
clothing. His school visitor had befriended him for two years, providing him 
with a free home. The cough was so severe that it was unbearable in any home. 
This boy stayed two years at the State Infirmary. From a bed patient he grew 
strong enough to work on the farm, and he then wanted to try his strength outside 
the institution. A vacation camp was found for the summer and in the fall he 
was ready to go to work. His brother promised him a home if he could pay some- 
thing, and he obtained a job as errand boy. He is now nineteen and earns ten 
dollars a week. That which seemed impossible has been achieved and will con- 



Pt. I. 13 

tinue, with reasonable care, through the ceaseless efforts and encouragement of the 
social worker. 

Occupational Therapy. 

The establishment of occupational therapy in the hospital has been a great social 
as well as therapeutic asset to the patients. To go into the work shop any day and 
see physically and mentally handicapped persons making rugs, baskets and other 
articles means that life and interest have been revived for many who had hitherto 
been inert, idle and discontent. Many men in the hospital and tuberculous wards 
and some mental patients have been particularly helped to more physical and men- 
tal activity. It also means the re-awakening of ambition and the desire to achieve. 
A small shop has been opened in one of the male hospital corridors which gives 
those confined to the wards a chance to work. It is hoped to see workshops ex- 
tended to the women's wards and so to increase the health, work and contentment 
among our people. 

Women. 

The aged and chronically sick women are now receiving adequate attention with 
the service of a full-time worker. There is much to be done in making contacts 
with relatives and friends, settling small properties and insurances, and securing 
jobs for middle-aged women who are able to work. Visiting in the wards is very 
important in helping the patients to feel that they are still individuals who count 
and are not lost in a huge public institution. Simple, thoughtful, individual ser- 
vice can be given which makes all the difference between loneliness and content- 
ment. Efforts are made to board out aged persons who are physically fit for home 
care. 

The younger women and girls always present the greatest social problems. 
Many are defective delinquent, psychopathic, feeble-minded and diseased. They 
should never be permitted to return to the community, once having come to the 
State's attention. Some are clever enough to have evaded arrest, and so by law 
are not defective delinquents. Others might go to custodial institutions if they 
were not so overcrowded. It would be very helpful if the Department of Public 
Welfare had the authority to petition the court to commit to the Colony for De- 
fective Delinquents those persons who, temporarily in its care, are found to be 
defective mentally and have long records of misbehavior, idleness and disorder, 
but who do not come within the provisions of the existing law because they have 
no court record. As it is, they are at liberty to return to the community to be a 
menace to themselves and to others. To hold them indefinitely at the Infirmary 
creates disciplinary problems for the institution, and finally causes runaways. 
The visitors do place these girls at work and try to supervise them and encourage 
them to follow up their medical treatments at the clinics, but girls who do not want 
any supervision soon lose themselves. For example: 

May, admitted for confinement, badly diseased, was formerly a state ward and 
was legally adopted by very good people who gave her every opportunity. She 
made a forced marriage, left her husband, became a prostitute, and while at the 
State Infirmary carried on a secret correspondence with a prisoner at Concord. 
Her child was colored, although she showed no signs of colored blood. When, after 
two years, she was ready for discharge, she was placed at work. She remained 
one month at work in a very good home which she said she liked, but she left 
without notice. Her whereabouts are unknown and she is a menace to any com- 
munity. 

Many high-grade feeble-minded patients, if they are to be placed out, should 
first be committed to the Division of Supervision of the Department of Mental 
Diseases, which has a legal right to supervise them in the community or commit 
them to an institution. Twenty-five (25) such girls are at the State Infirmary 
at this date, eager for their liberty. 

One hundred three (103) women were admitted to the State Infirmary because of 
illegitimate pregnancy. Of the 54 first offenders, 36 came for confinement and 
18 with their babies for convalescence; of the 33 women having two illegitimate 
children, 24 came for confinement and 9 with their babies for convalescence; and 
of the 6 women having three illegitimate children, 5 came for confinement and one 
with her baby for convalescence. Ten (10) of the 103 women were married and 



14 P.D. 17. 

illegitimately pregnant. Forty-seven (47) admissions were from the Industrial 
School for Girls and from the Reformatory for Women. 
Five (5) married women were admitted for legitimate confinement. 

Children. 

At the State Infirmary on December 1, 1929, there were 211 patients under 21 
years old; 54 between the ages of 15 and 21 years, and 157 children under 15 years 
of age. The older group may be classified as follows: 24 pregnant or convalescent 
from confinement, 16 with venereal diseases, 8 with chronic illnesses, 4 tubercu- 
lous, and 2 feeble-minded. The younger group may be classified as follows: 50 
feeble-minded, 15 tuberculous, 25 with chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart, 
congenital syphilis, paraphlegia, and 67 infants with their mothers. Of the whole 
number 74 are wards of the Division of Child Guardianship, and 22 (19 girls and 
3 boys) are wards of the Division of Juvenile Training. 

A large number of infants are obliged to stay longer periods than their own 
health demands because their mothers are receiving treatment for venereal diseases, 
awaiting deportation, or commitment to feeble-minded schools. For social rea- 
sons it has seemed better to detain them until the mothers are able to be dis- 
charged. 

Supervision and Placement. 

Supervision is always the most interesting and satisfying part of the work be- 
cause it is possible to see character development and the stabilization of wandering 
and ineffective lives. Various methods of treatment are studied by the visitors, 
discussed, improved or abandoned. 

The type of women and girls admitted to the State Infirmary seems to be chang- 
ing. Those now admitted have less moral stamina and "backbone" than formerly. 
Many are mentally and physically incapable of attaining high standards of work 
and living. Work in the right environment is the best test and the best remedy. 
Although it has always been hard to find employment for the mother and baby, 
constant insistence that it can be found usually brings success. We still believe 
it to be the most satisfactory solution of the problem of mothers with illegitimate 
babies, and we can find homes of varying kinds, always fulfilling our moral re- 
quirements. 

Girls with venereal diseases need special placement with the privilege of going 
to clinics for follow-up treatment. The transportation workers' days are well 
filled with the hospital visits necessary to the good health of the girls and children. 

The immediate cases at hand are given consideration and care, but we have long 
recognized the need of protection for the child born out of wedlock. A more inclu- 
sive and state-wide service to every unmarried mother would protect the children, 
and proper supervision of the mother would be a prevention of illegitimacy. It is 
hoped that the Commission on the Laws Relative to Children will recommend 
such protection. For example: 

Mabel was referred to us by a maternity hospital, which stated that a woman 
was coming to take her two-weeks'-old baby for adoption on that day. Mabel's 
family did not know of her trouble, the baby's father had sent money for the hos- 
pital bill, and Mabel was going to a friend. The adopting parent was to be a 
person from Nova Scotia who was a sister of a friend. The mother and baby were 
seen and were persuaded to wait until the adoptive home could be investigated. 
The mother agreed to go to the Infirmary for convalescence. The would-be 
adopting mother came to the maternity hospital two hours after the girl had left 
and was referred to this subdivision, but did not come. Investigation proved the 
proposed home in Nova Scotia to be very unfit. The mother's family was able to 
provide for her and the baby was boarded by a child-placing agency in a home 
near the mother. If the hospital had not been so socially minded that it referred 
the adoption for investigation, the baby would have been given away with less 
consideration than is given to the matter of giving away a kitten. 

Regardless of the many handicaps of our patients, the visitors give remarkable 
assistance and care to many who come to find a kindly world within the institu- 
tion and a friendly service eager to help them to life outside. 



Pt.L 

Women and Children admitted to the State Infirmary during the Year 

November 30, 1929. 

Ages at Admission. 



Under 1 

1 to 7 39 

8 to 16 55 

17 to 21 144 

Over 21 355 



Total Admissions 

Sources of Admission. 
Under 1: 

Board of Public Welfare 

Boards of Health .... 

Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston ..... 
Division of Child Guardianship 



1 to 7: 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Boards of Health . . 

Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston ..... 
Division of Child Guardianship 



8 to 16: 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

Division of Child Guardianship 
Industrial School for Girls 
Industrial Schools for Boys 



17 to 21: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Institutions Registration Department 

Boston .... 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Industrial School for Girls 
Industrial Schools for Boys 
State Schools for Feeble-minded 
Reformatory for Women 
Other Institutions . 



Over 21: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Board of Health ..... 

Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

State Schools for Feeble-minded 

Reformatory for Women 

Other Institutions ..... 



659 



22 

1 

37 
6 

66 

11 
3 

12 
13 

39 

11 

13 

4 
19 
5 

55 

55 

44 
11 

11 
12 

2 
7 
2 



219 
10 

108 

5 

10 

3 

355 



Diseases at Admission. 
Under 1: 
Infancy 
Tuberculosis . 
Syphilis 

Feeble-mindedness 
Miscellaneous diseases 



1 to 7: 

Tuberculosis . 
Feeble-mindedness 
Mental observation 
Miscellaneous diseases 
No disease 



8 to 16: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Pregnancy 

Mental observation 

Miscellaneous diseases 

No disease 



17 to 21: 

, Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Pregnancy 

Feeble-mindedness 

Miscellaneous diseases 



Over 21: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Pregnancy 

Alcoholism 

Cancer . 

Mental observation 

Arteriosclerosis 

Blind . 

Morphine 

Miscellaneous diseases 



15 



18 
19 

7 
49 

1 
50 

144 



51 



54 

1 

2 

11 

48 

1 

1 

174 

355 



Births, 110 (105 illegitimate — 5 legitimate). 
Deaths, 490 (115 women and 40 children). 

Women and Children discharged from the State Infirmary during the Year ending 

November 30, 1929. 



Discharged to: 

Relatives (174 women and 14 children) 
Husband ..... 
Employment ..... 
Employment with child (2S children) 
Private agencies (2 women and 1 child) 
Place of Settlement 
Deported by United States Immigration (10 

women and 2 children) 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Girls Parole Department (29 women and 18 

children) ..... 
Boys Industrial School . 



188 

7 

42 

56 

3 

20 

12 
61 

47 
2 



Discharged to: 

Court ...... 

Reformatory for Women (12 women and 7 
children) .... 

State Sanatoria 

State Schools for Feeble-minded 

Monson State Hospital . 

Insane Ward of State Infirmary 

Other institutions (6 women and 1 child) 

Absconded (45 women and 3 children) 



19 
3 

13 
3 

18 

7 

48 

557 



16 



P.D. 17. 



Men admitted to the State Infirmary during the Year ending November 80, 1929. 



Ages at Admission. 

21 to 40 244 

41 to 60 671 

Over 60 825 



Source of Admission. 
21 to 40: 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Boards of Health ..... 
Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 



1,740 



120 
5 



119 

244 



41 to 60: 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Boards of Health . 
Institutions Registration 
Boston 



Over 60: 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Boards of Health . 
Institutions Registration 
Boston 



Department, 



Department, 



330 



335 
671 



490 

1 



334 
825 



Diseases at Admission. 
21 to 40: 

Tuberculosis 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Alcoholism 

Cancer . 

Mental 

Miscellaneous diseases 

No disease 



41 to 60: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Alcoholism 

Arteriosclerosis 

Cancer . 

Mental 

Miscellaneous diseases 

No disease 



Over 60: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Alcoholism 

Arteriosclerosis 

Cancer . 

Mental 

Miscellaneous diseases 



61 
23 

8 
9 
2 
3 
131 
7 

244 



671 



825 



Summary of Court Work. 



Warrants on bastardy complaint ........... 20 

Cases appealed to Superior Court ........... 

Adjudications of paternity (14 orders — 3 lump sums) ....... 17 

Agreements for support of illegitimate children ......... 6 

Adoption of children by relatives ........... 2 

Commitments to schools for feeble-minded ......... 10 

Money collected for support of illegitimate children ........ $5,737.16 

Money paid out for support of illegitimate children ........ $1,583.87 

Number of accouuts for illegitimate children ......... 65 

Balance on hand for illegitimate children, Nov. 30, 1929 $16,919.56 

Summary of Placement Work. 

Persons under active supervision, Nov. 30, 



1929 
91 mothers with 91 children at work 
45 mothers boarding children in foster 

homes .... 

Other women and girls . 
Other children under supervision 
Girls temporarily in institutions 

Visits to girls in own homes 

Visits to girls at employment 

Visits to girls elsewhere 



415 

182 

45 

130 

40 

18 

65 

154 

496 



Visits of girls to clinics of hospitals . . 297 

Cases referred to private agencies . . 2 

Replacements . . . . . .114 

Marriages ...... 9 

Places of employment investigated . . 71 

Applications at office . . . .63 

Sixty-five savings accounts for girls at 

work . . . • . ... $2,906.92 

Children referred for placement to Division of 

Child Guardianship .... 40 



Men discharged from the State Infirmary during the Year ending November 80, 1929. 



To relatives .... 
To place of settlement 

To Court 

To employment 

To other states 

To other countries 

Deported by United States Immigration 



134 

79 

1 

48 

13 

1 

2 



To other institutions . 
Insane Ward (commitments) 
Without investigation but interviewed 
Absconded . 



9 

30 

719 

402 

1,438 



Social Service for Men. 

Number of men admitted to the State Infirmary ......... 1,740 

Number of cases receiving social service consideration (short service, 150; intensive service, 231) . 381 
Miscellaneous services to patients in wards .......... 2,925 

Number of men discharged ............. 1,438 

Number of men discharged without investigation, but interviewed ...... 719 

Social service cases supervised in community . . . . . . . . . .12 

Employment found .............. 32 

Number of men assisted in community while looking for work ....... 137 



Pt. I. 17 

General Summary. 

Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary ........ 659 

Births at the State Infirmary 110 

Women and children discharged from the State Infirmary ........ 557 

Deaths at the State Infirmary 490 

Women and children discharged directly to other divisions ....... 129 

Women and children discharged by the subdivision of social service ...... 328 

Men admitted to the State Infirmary _. ._ . . . . . . . . . 1,740 

Men discharged by the subdivision of social service ......... 1,036 

Applications for assistance at office (63 women, 21 men) ........ 84 

Persons under supervision in the community, Nov. 30, 1929 ....... 427 

Total number assisted by the Subdivision of Social Service during year ending Nov. 3C, 1929 2,256 

DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 

Miss Winifked A. Keneran, Director. 

Children in Care and Custody .of the Division. 

At the beginning of the past year, December 1, 1928, the number of children 
under care and supervision of the Division of Child Guardianship was 5,807. There 
were 1,237 children admitted to care, viz.: 647 neglected, 495 dependent, and 95 
delinquent, making the total number for the year, 7,044. 

Nine hundred nine (909) children were discharged from custody, viz.: 502 ne- 
glected, 326 dependent and 81 delinquent; hence there remained on November 30, 
1929, 6,135 x children classified as dependent, 2,990; neglected, 2,953; wayward, 
14; delinquent, 178. The increase in population for the year was 328, or 5.6%. 

These children were cared for as follows: Placed in families and fully supported 
by the Commonwealth, 4,076; in families and partly supported, 222; in families 
free of expense, 498; receiving wages, 831; in hospitals, 314; in United States 
service, 66; married, 41; whereabouts unknown, 87. 

The large majority of children under care were born in Massachusetts or in one 
of the other New England states, but there are 133 of foreign birth, representing 
the following countries: England, 12; Canada, 55; Italy, 35; Poland, 8; Portu- 
gal, 6; Armenia, 3; Russia, 3; Greece, 2; France, 2; Austria, 1; Scotland, 1; 
Syria, 1; Mexico, 1; Sweden, 1; Finland, 1; Nicaragua, 1. 

We have 385 colored children under care. 

The number of illegitimate children is approximately the same as in previous 
years — about 25% of the whole number supported. 

Last year we reported 268 full orphans under care: this year there are 328 so 
classified, while 1,500 have one living parent. In 961 cases the father is the sur- 
viving parent and in 539 cases the mother is living. 

Children Received. 

During the year 1,237 children were received by the division, including 742 court 
committed and 495 dependent children. Ninety-five (95) of those committed by 
court were delinquent and 647 neglected; 327 of this number of neglected children 
were permanently committed and the remaining 320 were temporary commitments. 
The final disposition of these cases is as follows: 83 were later committed perma- 
nently to the custody. of the department, 147 were discharged to court, 4 were 
bailed and 1 died. At the end of the year, there were 85 cases pending final action. 

A brief study of these 647 neglected cases and the causes which led to the chil- 
dren's appearance in court and their commitment to this department, shows that 
immorality, intemperance, desertion and mental defect are the outstanding rea- 
sons for the breaking up of families. In no case, however, does it appear that any 
one reason can be given for the removal of the children, but there is generally a 
combination of causes which brings the inevitable result. In 270 cases it has been 
found that immorality is the main reason, but there are eight other contributory 
causes, not all appearing in every case. In 204 cases, intemperance stands out as 

1 In addition to these 6,135 children, the Department had under its supervision and visitation November 
30, 1929, 506 boys at the Lyman School for Boys; 293 girls at the Industrial School for Girls; 295 boys at 
the Industrial School for Boys; 2,537 boys and 615 girls in the custody of the Trustees of the Massachu- 
setts Training Schools, outside the schools; 81 boys and 94 girls, patients at the Massachusetts Hospital 
School; and 162 children, patients at the State Infirmary, who are either young infants with their mothers, 
or else under hospital treatment, making a total of 10,718 children in the care and custody or under the 
supervision of the department. There were also 988 children supported at the expense of cities and towns 
who were subject to the department's visitation, reported upon at page 51. 



18 P.D. 17. 

the important reason, and in 137 cases, desertion is re-current. The fourth group, 
or 36 children, were committed because of mental defect of one or both parents 
and one of several other causes. 

Three hundred thirty-four (334) of the 495 dependent children were received 
under the provisions of the General Laws, chapter 119, section 38; 199 were legiti- 
mate and 135 were illegitimate children. The study of each case shows that in 
the large majority the removal of the mother from the home resulted in the re- 
moval of the children. It is seldom that one cause alone is responsible for the 
breaking up of a family and it should be borne in mind that, coupled with the 
mother's removal, the desertion, immorality, intemperance or disability of the 
father is often a factor in these dependent cases as well as in the neglect cases. 

Ten (10) of the legitimate children were full orphans, received under the provi- 
sions of this statute because of the existence of reliable relatives whose signatures 
it seemed advisable to obtain, or because of settlement. Otherwise, these chil- 
dren would have been committed by boards of public welfare under General Laws, 
chapter 119, section 22. 

One hundred fifty-eight (158) children were received because of the absence of 
the mother from the home; 56 were taken because of her death; 43 because of her 
illness, and 25 because of her commitment to a hospital for the insane. Five (5) 
others had mothers in the Reformatory for Women. One mother was at Monson 
State Hospital, another a defective delinquent at Bridgewater, and 8 had deserted. 
Twenty (20) mothers had been classified as feeble-minded and either committed 
to proper institutions or placed under supervision. Twenty (20) children were 
received because they needed special care; a few were feeble-minded and several 
needed treatment for venereal diseases and were received for care at Bradford 
Infirmary. 

Causes for Reception of Legitimate Children. 

Per Cent 

1. Death of mother 28.1 

2. Illness of mother 21.5 

3. Insanity of mother . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4 

4. Mother feeble-minded . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.0 

5. Orphanage ............... 5.0 

6. Mother deserted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 

7. Mother in Reformatory for Women . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 

8. Mother in other institution . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 

9. Special care for child ............. 10.0 

10. Miscellaneous cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.0 

100.0 




Graph Illustrating Table. 



Pt. I. 



19 



One hundred thirty-five (135) illegitimate children were received as dependent 
under this same statute. The causes for such reception differ somewhat from the 
foregoing group and may be summarized as follows: Fourteen (14) children were 
received for orphanage, 11 because of ill health of the mother, and 3 mothers were 
in insane hospitals. Fifteen (15) mothers were in the Reformatory for Women, 1 
in the Defective Delinquent Colony and 1 in the House of the Good Shepherd. 
Thirty-seven (37) children had feeble-minded mothers, forming the largest group 
in this class. Eleven (11) of these mothers had been committed and supervision 
of the others was arranged. Six (6) mothers had deserted and the children were 
received upon agreement by the towns of settlement to reimburse for support. 
In nine cases the mother was under supervision and caring for a second illegitimate 
child. Seventeen (17) were children of mothers under the care of the Common- 
wealth, 11 having been committed to the Industrial School at Lancaster and 6 
were wards of this Division. Seven (7) children were received for special care. 

Fourteen (14) cases must be separately considered and cannot be classified with 
the others. In one instance the child had been adopted and was received because 
of illness of the adoptive mother. Two children were received because on the 
mother's marriage the step-father refused to assume responsibility. Four (4) were 
children of married women and were taken to avoid breaking up the home. Two 
(2) were colored children of white women, and one the child of a deaf mute who 
could support only herself. In one instance the child was taken because of the 
extreme youth of the mother and the good character of her home. An illegiti- 
mate girl and her baby were received from her adoptive parents and one child 
was received from an immoral mother. 



Causes for Reception of Illegitimate Children. 

Per Cent 

1. Death of mother . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.4 

2. Illness of mother 8.2 

3. Insanity of mother . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 

4. Mother feeble-minded 27.4 

5. Mother at Industrial School for Girls or a state ward . . . . . . . 12.6 

6. Mother at Reformatory for Women . . . . . . . . . . 11.1 

7. Mother at other institution . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4 

8. Mother has second illegitimate child . . . . . . . . . . 6.7 

9. Mother deserted .............. 4.4 

10. Special care for child . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2 

11. Miscellaneous cases . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.4 




100.0 



Graph Illustrating Table. 



20 P.D. 17. 

One hundred forty-three (143) of these children had legal settlements and the 
applications for their admission were accompanied by agreements on the part of 
the town of settlement for support. 

In addition, 155 children were committed under General Laws, chapter 119, 
section 22. These children have no settlement and no one available with the legal 
right to sign the application for their reception. Many have been deserted and 
others have parents who because of physical or mental defects are unable to pro- 
vide. 

The following are the statistics of the subdivision of investigation: 

Statistics of the Subdivision of Investigation. 

Applications pending Dec. 1, 1928 .......... 427 

Applications received Dec. 1, 1928, to Nov. 30, 1929 (involving 96 re-applications) . 1,267 

Total 1,694 

Dispositions as follows: 

Applications withdrawn ........... 105 

Advised only ............. 25 

Assumed by relatives ............ 434 

Assumed by private agencies .......... 87 

Assumed by public agencies .......... 299 

Received Sec. 38, Chapter 119, General Laws 334 

Pending Dec. 1, 1929 410 

Total . • 1,694 

Applications for discharge pending Dec. 1, 1928 ....... 43 

Applications for discharge received Dec. 1, 1928, to Nov. 30, 1929 .... 175 

Total 218 

Dispositions as follows: 

Discharged 108 

Refused 11 

Withdrawn 37 

Pending Dec. 1, 1929 62 

Total 218 

After care: 

Cases pending Dec. 1, 1928 39 

Cases added Dec. 1, 1928, to Nov. 30, 1929 52 

Total 91 

Dispositions as follows: 

Cases closed ............. 41 

Investigation leads to discharge .......... 18 

Pending Dec. 1, 1929 32 

Total 91 

Infants Under Care. 

The number of children in this group at the beginning of the year was 408. 
Three hundred eleven (311) were received, making the whole number supported 
719. 

Included in the number received were 9 foundlings who were committed by 
boards of public welfare in accordance with General Laws, chapter 119, section 22, 
and 6 infants who were removed from unsuitable boarding homes under the pro- 
visions of section 28 of the same chapter. 

One hundred seventy-four (174) infants, having reached the age of three years 
were transferred to the subdivision for older children, 21 died, 5 were legally adopted, 
26 were discharged to parents or relatives, 24 were discharged to court and 3 to 
place of settlement; hence there were 466 infants under care at the end of the 
year. 

These babies are placed out and supervised by four visiting nurses, who made 
8,670 visits. This number includes, 5,407 visits to our infant wards, and 3,263 
visits of inspection, investigation and supervision of prospective foster homes, 
licensed boarding homes and infants boarded privately. 

Mortality Rate in Detail. 

Under Care Died Rate 

Birth to one year 97 11 11.3% 

One year to two years 220 7 3.18% 

Two years to three years 402 3 -74% 

719 21 2.92% 



Pt. I. 21 

Eight (8) of the infants in the above table died at the State Infirmary, 1 at 
Bradford Infirmary, 9 in local hospitals, and 3 in foster homes. 

Details of Mortality of Infants under One Year of Age. 

Placed in Hospitals. 



Length of Time 
Under Care in Hospital Age at Death 



Cause 



Mos. 


Days 


Mos. 


Days 


Mos. 


Days 




_ 


6 


_ 


5 


2 


18 


Pneumonia 


_ 


12 


— 


12 


1 


18 


Malnutrition 


1 


17 


1 


17 


8 


11 


Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida 


2 


12 


2 


12 


o 


16 


Spina Bifida 


1 


26 


— 


4 


9 


21 


Pneumonia 


_ 


21 


- 


20 


1 


- 


Malnutrition 


2 


10 


2 


10 


3 


25 


Intestinal Indigestion 


_ 


5 


— 


o 


o 


7 


Infectious Diarrhea 


- 


9 


- 


9 


1 


13 


Spina Bifida 


- 


7 


- 


7 


2 


27 


Pneumonia 



Boarded in Foster Homes. 


Under Care Age at Death Cause 


A 


Mos. Days Mos. Days 
. . 3 6 8 13 Pneumonia 


Details of Mortality of Infants between One and Three Years of Age. 

Placed in Hospitals. 


Length of Time 
Under Care in Hospital Age at Death Cause 





Yrs. 


Mos. 


Days 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


Days 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


Days 




A 


1 


4 


_ 


_ 


2 


28 


1 


• 7 


_ 


Carcinoma of kidney 


B 


— 


11 


25 


— 


— 


9 


1 


4 


5 


Convulsions 


C 


- 


7 


4 


- 


7 


4 


1 


11 


7 


Birth Paralysis 


D 


1 


9 


20 


1 


9 


20 


2 


8 


5 


Imbecile 


E 


1 


6 


5 


— 


— 


1 


2 


— 


24 


Convulsions 


F 


- 


10 


25 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


1 


Diphtheria, Meningitis 


G 


— 


1 


27 


— 


1 


27 


2 


10 


— 


Ulcer on chest wall 


H 


2 


2 


3 


- 


1 


27 


2 


7 


- 


Congenital Idiocy 



Boarded in Foster Homes. 



Under Care 



Age at Death 



Cause 



r rs. Mos. 


Days 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


Days 


9 


10 
5 


1 
1 


4 


16 
13 



Convulsions 
Pneumonia 



The following table shows the rate of mortality among infants under three years, 
also under one year — for the past ten-year period : 





Under One 


Year 


Under 


Three 


Years 




Total 


Died 


Percentage 


Total 


Died 


Percentage 


1920 


180 


23 


12.77 


646 


33 


5.10 


1921 


170 


16 


9.41 


614 


30 


4.88 


1922 


155 


9 


5.8 


588 


20 


3.4 


1923 


106 


9 


8.5 


616 


20 


3.2 


1924 


98 


6 


6.12 


571 


13 


2.27 


1925 


98 


15 


15.3 


592 


22 


3.7 


1926 . . 


110 


5 


4.5 


637 


16 


2.5 


1927 .... 


131 


8 


6.1 


531 


6 


2.1 


1928 .... 


86 


9 


10.45 


645 


18 


2.79 


1929 


97 


11 


11.3 


719 


21 


2.92 



22 P.D. 17. 

Although the number of deaths was 21 this year in contrast to 18 the previous 
year, it will be noted that there were 719 infants under care while 645 was the total 
number for 1928. 

The number of cases referred to Bradford Infirmary shows a constant increase. 
Last year we sent 577 children for care, which was 72 more than the previous year. 
The nature of the illnesses varied little but the large majority of surgical cases were 
tonsillectomies, as in the previous years. Since the services of the hospital and 
staff have been extended to include the care of young infants, we have been helped 
out of several difficult situations, and we gratefully appreciate this assistance. 

Children over Three Years of Age. 
All children above the age of three years and numbering 5,669 are classified in 
three groups: 

Group A. Boys and girls between 3 and 12 years. 
Group B. Girls between 12 and 21 years. 
Group C. Boys between 12 and 21 years. 

Group A. — Sixteen visitors made 11,395 visits to 2,746 children during the 
year. Each visitor has supervision of an average number of 170 children; this 
number indicates that our workers are carrying a heavy load, and we cannot ex- 
pect the best results for each child unless we can give him more time and individual 
attention. We are repeatedly called upon to provide for children who are serious 
behavior problems. They come to us with a poor school record, even to the ex- 
tent of repeating grades, while examinations at a mental clinic often give them 
high intelligence quotients. It is difficult to find the right home for a child of this 
type, and sometimes frequent relocations are necessary. Naturally a visitor who 
is obliged to take the responsibility of this child must devote much time to his 
case, to the exclusion of her 169 others. Again, we have serious health problems, 
many requiring frequent visits to hospitals and clinics. The following case will 
illustrate : 

Grace, 9 years old, one of a family of five children, was referred by a local board 
of health on account of a severe case of keratitis. Her parents were divorced, the 
mother (with whom she lived) was shiftless, and home conditions were very poor. 
When this child was received she was nearly blind and was obliged to wear dark 
glasses. Weekly treatments at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Eye 
and Ear Infirmary were found necessary, and she has been accompanied on forty 
visits to these hospitals. An operation for removal of tonsils and adenoids has 
been performed. She is now in very good condition and the hospital physicians 
assure us that she will soon be able to return home and to attend school. 

Group B. — In this group of "Older Girls" there are 1,363 girls between 12 and 
21 years of age. Five hundred eighteen (518) have passed the age of fourteen and 
are attending school. In the elementary schools we have 130 girls; in junior high 
school there are 144, in high school 226, and in schools of higher education, 18. 
The following table is of interest: 

Wage Free Part Free Boarded 

Elementary 16 10 104 

Junior High 7 6 44 87 

High 73 34 82 37 

We aim to have all our girls in high school self-supporting but because some of 
them are physically handicapped we are paying board for the number indicated. 

Fourteen (14) girls are preparing to teach; 6 are in Salem Normal School, 5 
in Bridgewater Normal, 1 in North Adams Normal, and 2 in Boston Teachers 
College. Two (2) girls are attending business college. 

G. H. was received as dependent at the age of eleven. Her mother was dead 
and her father had been committed to jail. The girl made an excellent record in 
high school and during her entire course earned a small wage which was used for 
clothing and spending money. The summer after graduation she worked and saved 
$25 toward her college expenses. She remained in the same home and continued 
at wages, while she took up stenography as a post-graduate course in order to ac- 
quire points necessary for college. She passed her entrance examination credit- 
ably. Through the interest of her foster father a position was obtained during the 
summer, enabling her to earn $12 a week. As she was in a free home she was 



Pt. I. 23 

able to save $130. Again, through the influence of interested people, including 
the principal of the high school and the Woman's Club, she received $500 m schol- 
arships, $400 for tuition, and $100 for extras. She entered college last fall and is 
doing well. She aims to secure work in a publishing house after graduation. 

The majority of girls not in school are employed at housework. One hundred 
seventy-four. (174) are so engaged. Fifty-two (52) are in mills or factories, 32 in 
offices and 64 are otherwise employed. This last group shows many in stores and 
a goodly number in hospitals, either as ward maids or attendants. In addition, 
7 girls are taking the regular hospital course in nurses training. 

Group C. — There are 1,576 boys in this group. One thousand two hundred 
twenty-seven (1,227) are over 14 years of age, and 387 of these are attending school. 

Two hundred ten (210) of this number are in elementary and junior high schools, 
171 are in high schools, trade, evening and business schools, and 6 are in colleges. 

The boys in high schools and colleges are earning their way through school either 
in whole or in part, with excellent prospects of being able to complete the courses 
they have begun. There are 66 boys in the United States Army, Navy, Marine 
Corps, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine. Nearly all have entered the Service 
with the intention of learning trades. Not all stay for their enlistment periods 
but it can be safaly said that at least one half serve the enlistment period or re- 
enlist to acquire advanced ratings. The latter make good in the Service or in 
civil life after they leave the Service. 

The Feeble-Minded Group. 

About 200 children under our care have been definitely diagnosed feeble-minded, 
and in many cases institutional care has been recommended. The latter recom- 
mendation has not been possible to accomplish, as the executives are seriously 
handicapped by lack of space in their institutions. In the meantime the children 
are placed in the community for foster-home care. 

A special type of home is selected for the placement of the feeble-minded child, 
and considerable time and effort applied to the education of the foster mother as 
to the meaning and application of mental hygiene to the mentally handicapped 
child in her care. 

There are 93 feeble-minded girls and 35 boys in 24 foster homes, each home con- 
taining from four to six children. This idea of grouping has emanated from ac- 
tual experience over a period of years, resulting in the discovery that children of 
this class are adjusted more readily in groups. All of them attend school except 
a small number who are unteachable and who will be admitted to one of the schools 
for the feeble-minded at an early date. The ages range from five to sixteen years, 
and many of them at the age of sixteen have reached the fourth or fifth grade. 
In the meantime there have been occasional episodes of misbehavior necessitating 
a change of home with consequent readjustment. 

In the past when schools were not equipped with special classes for retarded 
children, it was difficult for the feeble-minded child to adhere to a constructive 
program; but cities and towns in Massachusetts are now including in their edu- 
cational system facilities for studying the abilities and disabilities of each child, 
so that the abilities may be utilized educationally, vocationally and socially. In 
the future this department hopes to locate all feeble-minded children under care 
in localities where special classes are available. 

Twenty-seven (27) girls who have passed the age of sixteen years are employed 
as domestics; 4 of these attend night school, and one also is studying the violin. 
Fourteen (14) girls are employed in institutions, where they react splendidly to 
intelligent supervision and routine environment. Thirteen (13) are employed as 
maids in private homes, and for the most part the adjustment is satisfactory in 
the achievement of a reasonable amount of happiness. There are, of course, 
frequent changes to other wage homes due to various causes: primarily, rebellion 
against supervision, lack of emotional control, infantile reactions, and petty thiev- 
ing. The wages paid to the girls vary from $2 to $6 per week. 

There are 18 feeble-minded children of this group at the State Infirmary, some 
of whom need permanent institutional care for physical disabilities; others who 
are too low-grade for placement and are awaiting transfer to the school for the 
feeble-minded; and three who have recently been considered favorable for a try- 
out in the community and will shortly be placed. 



24 



P.D. 17 



It is an accepted fact that all feeble-minded persons cannot be segregated in 
institutions, and that the vast majority will not need such provision. If some of 
the scholastic training is supplanted by industrial training and special social supar- 
vision provided, the individual will probably adjust and live safely and usefully 
in the communit} 7 . 

Adoptions. 

The usual satisfactory results were obtained in the adoption work this year. 
We, of course, have a much greater demand for children to adopt than. we can 
supply because our policy is to make a careful study of the family history and, as 
a consequence, the prospects of the child, before we ask people to take them into 
their homes permanently. It is harder to prevent people from adopting our chil- 
dren than it is to have them adopted. 

In all our cases children have to be with the proposed adopting parents for at 
least a year before the petition is presented to the court, in order to make sure 
that the child really fits into the home life. 

As regards the parents, failure to support the child for two years or desertion for 
two years, makes their consent unnecessary. It is interesting to observe that 
parental ties are apparently easily broken because after an absence of two or three 
years from the child it is very rare to have the parents enter any objection to the 
adoption. In fact, if they can be found, they generally readily consent to the 
adoption, knowing that the child will have a better future with the adopting 
parents than with themselves. 

During the year adoptions were allowed in the following counties: 



Berkshire .... 


1 


Suffolk . 


4 


Bristol .... 


1 


Worcester . . . . 


1 


Essex 


3 




— 


Middlesex .... 


. 20 


Total . 


. 32 


Norfolk .... 


2 







Applications for children for adoption: Pending, December 1, 1928, 13; new 
applications, 103; total, 118. Disapproved without investigation, 15; withdrawn, 
14; investigated, 75; pending, 12; total, 116. Homes investigated, 75; approved, 
56; disapproved, 19. 

Thirty-five (35) children have been placed for adoption during the year. Thirty- 
two (32) children have been adopted, 23 girls and 9 boys. The oldest child adopted 
was a girl eighteen years old, and the youngest was a boy two years of age. There 
are now on trial for adoption 48 children. 



Collections received from Cities and Towns and directly from Parents 




Cities and 




Direct Towns 


Total 


1913 $6,999 30 $9,240 71 


$16,240 01 


1914 . 












8,017 75 11,496 87 


19,514 62 


1915 . 












7,106 88 17,959 41 


25,066 29 


1916 . 












12,528 02 21,828 07 


34,356 09 


1917 . 












16,620 52 24,651 03 


41,271 55 


1918 . 












25,936 02 28,545 45 


54,481 47 


1919 . 












34,084 65 44,816 77 


78,901 42 


1920 . 












41,492 42 57,433 73 


98,926 15 


1921 . 












33,258 83 62,771 26 


96,030 09 


1922 . 












29,847 30 62,623 99 


92,471 29 


1923 . 












31,800 51 83,775 21 


115,575 72 


1924 . 












32,779 61 77,703 60 


110,483 21 


1925 . 












29,521 11 88,827 06 


118,348 17 


1926 . 












30,357 82 112,790 55 


143,148 37 


1927 . 












30947 17 119,954 97 


150,902 14 


1928 . 












23,388 42 134,348 16 


162,736 58 


1929 . 












33,910 17 133,944 65 


167,854 82 



Summary of Children under Three Years of Age in Custody during the Year. 





D] 


PENDENT 




Neglected 


Grand 
Total 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Number Dec. 1, 192S 

Received Dec. 1, 1928, to Nov. 30, 1929 


175 
106 


133 
93 


308 
199 


48 
58 


52 
54 


100 
112 


408 
311 


Total number in charge 
Number transferred to division for 
older children .... 
Number discharged and died 


281 

67 
20 


226 

51 
29 


507 

118 
49 


106 

22 
20 


106 

34 
10 


212 

56 
30 


719 

174 
79 


Number remaining Dec. 1, 1929 . 


194 


146 


340 


64 


62 


126 


466 



- 



Pt. I. 



25 





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55 



26 P.D. 17. 

Disposition of Children held on Temporary Mittimi, pending further Order of the 

Court. 





Pending 

Dec. 1, 

1928 


Received 

During 

the 

Year 


Perma- 
nently 
Com- 
mitted 


Died 


Bailed 


Defaulted 


Dis- 
charged 

to 
Court 


Pending 

Dec. 1, 

1929 


Neglected 
Delinquent 


77 
4 


320 
59 


120 
12 


1 


5 
6 


2 

1 


177 
39 


94 
5 


Total 


81 


379 


132 


1 


11 


3 


216 


99 



Status of Children over Three Years of Age in Custody during the Year ending 

November SO, 1929. 



Girls 



Bvys 



In families, receiving wages 

In families, free of expense to Commonwealth 

In families, clothing only provided . 

In families, board and clothing provided 

In hospitals ..... 

In United States Service 

Married ..... 

Whereabouts unknown . 



Total number in charge Nov. 30, 1929 

Died 

Of Age 

Transferred to Lyman School for Boys 
Transferred to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory 
Committed to other correctional institutions 
Committed to Department of Mental Disease 
Adopted ...... 

Discharged to place of settlement 
Otherwise discharged .... 



for Women 



Total number in custody during the year 



379 
208 
174 
1,678 
141 

30 

28 

2,633 

8 

108 



16 

20 

3 

191 

2,995 



452 

274 

48 

1,990 

131 

65 

11 

59 

3,031 

11 

152 

12 

15 

8 



1 

11 

7 

1 

255 

3,504 



Neglected .... 
Delinquent .... 
General Laws, ch. 119, sect. 22 
General Laws, ch. 119, sect. 38 


Applications for Discharge 

Pending New 

Dec. 1, Applica- Granted 

1923 tions 

30 184 19 

3 26 3 

3 50 31 

13 114 57 


I 

Granted 
Condi- 
tionally 

63 

11 
3 

26 


Refused 

83 
6 

10 
17 


Pending 
With- Dec 1, 
drawn 1929 

8 41 

6 3 

5 4 

13 14 


Total .... 


49 374 110 


103 


116 


32 62 



1 Discharges for adoption and transfers to industrial schools are not included in this table. 

Disposition of Delinquent and Wayward Children by the Courts. 

Number of Court notices received . . . . . . . . . . . 6,141 

Disposition of cases attended: 
Committed to — 

Lyman School ............. 247 

Lyman School and appealed ........... S5 

Lyman School and sentence suspended . . . . . . . . .341 

Industrial School for Boys ........... 185 

Industrial School for Boys and appealed ........ 47 

Industrial School for Boys and sentence suspended ....... 331 

Industrial School for Girls . . . . . . . . . . .91 

Industrial School for Girls and appealed . . . . . . . . .84 

Industrial School for Girls and sentence suspended ....... 55 

Department of Public Welfare .......... 53 

Massachusetts Reformatory ........... 10 

Massachusetts Reformatory and appealed ........ 3 

County Training Schools ........... 96 

County Training Schools and appealed ......... 2 

County Training Schools and sentence suspended ....... 71 

Held for Superior Court ............ 52 

Probation 2,498 

Fined 301 

Fined and appealed ............. 19 

Fine suspended ............. 74 

Continued 1,286 



Pt. I. 27 

Continued in care of Department of Public Welfare ....... 40 

Failed to appear . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 

Discharged .............. 310 

Dismissed .............. 381 

Filed 1,450 

Appealed from finding ........ .... 42 

Total number of cases attended .......... 8,316 

Disposition of Neglected Children by the Courts. 

Number of Court notices received .......... 1,279 

Disposition of cases attended: 

Committed to Department of Public Welfare ........ 356 

Committed to Department of Public Welfare and appealed ...... 34 

Committed to Department of Public Welfare and sentence suspended ... 36 

Committed to Child Welfare Division, City of Boston ...... 33 

Placed on file 61 

Discharged .............. 23 

Dismissed .............. 87 

Continued 849 

Continued and placed in Home for Destitute Catholic Children .... 92 

Continued in charge of Department of Public Welfare ...... 302 

Failed to appear ............. 46 

Appealed from finding ............ 19 

Total number of cases attended .......... 1,941 

Localities from which New Children were Received. 

Abington 13 Everett, 8 Medford, 5 Sherborn, 3 

Adams, 2 Fairhaven, 1 Melrose, 2 Somerville, 15 

Amesbury, 15 Fall River, 7 Methuen, 1 Springfield, 66 

Arlington, 3 Falmouth, 5 Middleborough, 2 Swampscott, 1 

Attleboro, 9 Fitchburg, 12 Milford, 1 Swansea, 1 

Becket, 2 Florida, 1 Milton, 3 Taunton, 8 

Belmont, 1 Framingham, 26 Natick, 2 Templeton, 2 

Beverly, 1 Franklin, 12 Needham, 3 Tewksbury, 36 

Blackstone, 3 Gardner, 3 New Bedford, 23 Upton, 1 

Boston, 319 Gloucester, 7 Newburyport, 6 Wakefield, 1 

Braintree, 2 Great Barrington, 1 Newton, 1 Waltham, 13 

Bridgewater, 1 Greenfield, 12 North Reading, 2 Ware, 1 

Brockton, 28 Harwich, 1 Northampton, 3 Water town, 2 

Brookfield, 2 Haverhill, 17 Northbridge, 7 Webster, 1 

Brookline, 2 Hingham, 2 Norwood, 5 Welle?ley, 1 

Burlington, 1 Holyoke, 18 Orange, 12 Westfield, 14 

Cambridge, 64 Kingston, 1 Oxford, 2 Weston, 1 

Carver, 2 Lawrence, 17 Palmer, 8 Weymouth, 8 

Chelsea, 17 Leominster, 8 Peabody, 8 Williamstown, 5 

Chicopee 9 Lexington, 1 Pittsfield, 10 Winchendon, 5 

Clinton, 2 Littleton, 3 Plymouth, 8 Winchester, 1 

Concord, 1 Lowell, 16 Provincetown, 6 Winthrop, 5 

Danvers, 1 Ludlow, 2 Quincy, 37 Woburn, 3 

Dedham, 16 Lunenberg, 1 Reading, 3 Worcester, 38 

Duxbury, 1 Lynn, 69 Salem, 24 New York, 1 

Easthampton, 5 Maiden, 39 Salisbury, 1 

Easton, 3 Medfield, 1 Sheffield, 3 Total, 1,237 

Licensed Boarding Homes for Infants. 

During the last official year 627 licenses to maintain boarding homes for infants 
were granted under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, section 2, in 101 
cities and towns, in addition to the 494 licenses in force at the expiration of the 
previous year; 479 expired by the one-year limitation, 1 was revoked, and 547 
licenses permitting the boarding of 1,111 infants in 101 cities and towns remained 
in force November 30, 1929. Thirty-eight (38) applications were withdrawn and 
12 were refused. 

These represent the licensed homes, not only of infants under the supervision 
of the Commonwealth, but also of those under the age of two years placed out by 
parents and many private agencies. 

It has been necessary to take court action in private cases where laws govern- 
ing the protection of infants (chapter 119) were wilfully violated, and strict super- 
vision is being kept in many instances. 

The inspector of infant boarding homes made 509 visits during the year, super- 
vising boarding homes and investigating complaints. Six (6) babies were removed 
under the provisions of chapter 119, section 28. 



28 P.D. 17. 

Summary of Infants under Two Years of Age reported to the Depa rtment of Public 
Welfare from December 1, 1928, to November 30, 1929, under General Laws, 

Chapter 119, which provide for the Protection of Infants and the Licensing and 
Regulating of Boarding Homes for them. 

Number of 
Supervision of — Infants 

Reported 

Avon Home, Cambridge ............. 24 

Bethlehem Home, Taunton ............. 29 

Board of Public Welfare, Lynn ............ 1 

Board of Public Welfare, Marlboro ........... 1 

Board of Public Welfare, Needham ........... 1 

Board of Public Welfare, Worcester ........... 9 

Boston Children's Aid Association ............ 136 

Boston Children's Friend Society ............ 45 

Brockton Catholic Charities Centre ........... 8 

Catholic Charitable Bureau, Boston ........... 246 

Catholic Welfare Bureau, New Bedford 2 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 96 

Child Welfare House, Lynn 25 

Children's Mission to Children, Boston ........... 9 

Church Home Society, Boston . . . . . . . . . . . 47 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Aid and Relief ....... 1 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Child Guardianship ...... 418 

Evangeline Booth Hospital, Boston ........... 11 

Fall River Catholic Charities Center ........... 1 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Boston . . . . . . . . .Ill 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Lowell ......... 4 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Swampscott . . . . . . . . 16 

Girls' Parole Department, Boston ............ 2 

Girls' Welfare Society, Worcester ............ 9 

Guild of St. Agnes, Worcester ............ 9 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association .......... 38 

Haverhill Children's Aid Association ........... 1 

Holyoke Children's Aid Society ............ 2 

Home for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield ........ 16 

House of Mercy, Boston ............. 2 

Jewish Childron's Bureau ............. 28 

Lawrence Catholic Charities Centre ........... 8 

Lawrence City Mission .............. 3 

Lowell Catholic Charitable Bureau ........... 30 

Lowell Social Service League ............ 5 

Lynn Catholic Charities Centre . . . . . . . ' . . . .35 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society ........... 14 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston ......... 49 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield . . . . . . . . 11 

Northampton Children's Aid Society ........... 5 

Police Women ............... 1 

Private 1,344 

Probation Officers .............. 12 

Saint Mary's Infant Asylum, Boston ........... 229 

Salem Catholic Charities Centre ............ 25 

Sisters of Providence, Holyoke ............ 81 

Social Service Department, Boston Lying-in Hospital ........ 4 

Somerville Catholic Charities Centre ........... 20 

Talitha Cumi Home and Hospital, Boston ........ ... 68 

Temporary Home and Day Nursery, Worcester ......... 5 

Wachusett Children's Aid Society, Fitchburg .......... 19 

Welfare Worker, Wm. Filene's Sons Company ......... 1 

Worcester Children's Friend Society ........... 37 

3,354 

The actual number of infants reported, less duplication of supervision, was 3,303. 
Of this number 39 died, and 31 were adopted. 

Licensed Lying-in Hospitals, 1928-1929. 

Licenses in force Dec. 1, 1923 (in 100 towns) . . . . . . . . . .211 

Expired 89 

Surrendered and cancelled . . . . . . . . . . . .13 

Revoked ................ 

102 

Continuing in force .............. 109 

Reissues ............... 85 

New issues .............. 5 

_90 

Licenses in force Nov. 30, 1929 (in 97 towns) 199 

Corporations ....... 122 

Physicians . . . . . . • . . . . . . .24 

Nurses ............... 29 

Boards of Public Welfare ............ 4 

Other persons . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 

199 

Applications withdrawn, 17. 



Pt. I. 



29 



The inspector made 151 visits to hospitals and 32 visits to investigate complaints. 

Homes for convalescent, chronic and the aged are no longer licensed to care for 
maternity cases. It is unfair to those seeking quiet and rest to be annoyed by 
the disturbances that go with maternity work and the crying of babies, and most 
unfair to the new mother to be so closely associated with chronic cases. 

The returns from a questionnaire mailed to each licensee show 42,093 cases de- 
livered in 204 hospitals, — death of mothers, 289; death of babies, 1,211; still- 
births, 1,647. 

Two hundred seventy-one (271) notices of discharge from maternity hospitals 
of infants with inflamed eyes were received during the year. Fifteen of the 204 
hospitals reported eye infection. 

Prophylactic used in infants' eyes in every case was either silver nitrate 1 per 
cent, or argyrol 15 to 20 per cent. 

Tuition of Children under the Care and Control op the Department. 
Under the operation of General Laws, chapter 76, sections 7 to 10, inclusive, as 
amended by Statutes of 1921, chapters 272 and 214, governing reimbursements 
by the Commonwealth for tuition of state wards in public schools, bills received 
from 235 cities and towns, for the tuition and transportation of 3,262 children, 
amounting to $191,376.00 — viz., tuition, $171,199.52; transportation, $20,176.48 
— were audited by the department and paid by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth during the year ending November 30, 1929. The location of the children 
was as follows: 



Abington: 

1928, 5 

1929, 14 
Acton, 4 
Adams : 

1928, 2 

1929, 6 
Agawam, 3 
Amesbury, 1 
Amherst, 37 
Andover, 18 
Arlington, 12 
Ashburnham, 1 
Ashfield, 1 
Athol, 18 
Attleboro, 3 
Auburn : 

1928, 6 

1929, 1 
Ayer, 4 
Barnstable, 9 
Barre, 2 
Becket, 8 
Belchertown, 17 
Bellingham, 12 
Belmont, 22 
Berlin, 14 
Beverly, 6 
Billerica, 9 
Bolton, 15 
Boston, 179 
Bourne, 4 
Braintree, 3 
Brewster, 6 
Bridgewater, 16 
Brimfield, 3 
Brockton, 34 
Brookfield, 4 
Brookline, 4 
Buckland, 10 
Burlington, 3 
Cambridge, 79 
Canton, 5 
Carlisle, 10 
Charlemont, 2 
Charlton, 5 
Chelmsford, 34 
Chelsea, 16 
Cheshire, 8 
Chester, 3 
Chesterfield, 9 
Chicopee, 13 
Clinton, 10 
Colrain, 7 
Concord, 10 
Conway, 14 



Cummington, 1 
Dalton, 5 
Dana, 3 
Dan vers, 11 
Dedham, 22 
Deerfield, 9 
Dennis, 2 
Douglas, 10 
Dracut, 16 
Dunstable, 7 
East Bridgewater, 13 
Easthampton, 6 
Easton, 48 
Enfield, 28 
Erving, 1 
Everett, 22 
Fairhaven, 10 
Fall River, 12 
Falmouth, 7 
Fitchburg, 6 
Foxboro, 6 
Framingham, 44 
Franklin, 10 
Gardner, 4 
Georgetown, 1 
Gloucester, 4 
Grafton, 14 
Granby, 9 
Granville, 5 
Greenfield, 8 
Greenwich, 14 
Groton, 11 
Groveland, 12 
Hadley, 1 
Halifax, 4 
Hampden, 13 
Hanover, 3 
Hanson, 3 
Hardwick, 9 
Harvard, 5 
Haverhill, 9 
Hawley, 41 
Hingham: 

1928, 2 

1929, 2 
Holbrook, 5 
Holliston, 33 
Holyoke, 7 
Hopedale, 7 
Hopkinton, 66 
Hubbardston, 4 
Hudson, 22 
Huntington, 4 
Kingston, 9 
Lakeville, 13 
Lancaster, 3 



Lanesborough, 5 
Lawrence, 12 
Lee, 2 
Leicester, 8 
Lenox, 1 
Leominster, 5 
Lexington, 20 
Lincoln, l7 
Lowell, 58 
Lynn, 43 
Lynnfield, 5 
Maiden, 46 
Mansfield, 14 
Marblehead, 1 
Marlborough, 85 
Marion, 3 
Medford, 66 
Medway, 17 
Melrose, 27 
Mendon, 5 
Merrimac, 4 
Methuen, 9 
Middleborough, 11 
Middlefield, 2 
Millbury, 3 
Milford, 44 
Miliis, 2 
Milton, 13 
Monson, 15 
Montague, 5 
Natick, 23 
Needham, 4 
New Bedford, 3 
New Braintree, 10 
New Marlborough, 2 
Newton, 31 
North Adams, 1 
North Andover, 3 
North Brookfield, 13 
Northampton, 6 
Northborough, 7 
Northbridge, 1 
Norton, 3 
Norwell, 4 
Norwood, 8 
Orange, 15 
Oxford, 18 
Palmer, 23 
Paxton, 4 
Peabody, 5 
Pelham, 14 
Pembroke, 13 
Pepperell, 10 
Petersham, 12 
Phillipston, 5 
Pittsfield, 7 



Plainfield, 23 
Plainville, 4 
Plymouth, 4 
Plympton: 

1928, 1 
Provincetown, 2 
Quincy, 25 
Randolph, 36 
Raynham, 7 
Reading, 40 
Rehoboth, 6 
Revere, 22 
Rochester, 3 
Rockland, 18 
Rowe, 10 
Royalston, 4 
Rutland, 1 
Salem: 

1928, 1 

1929, 14 
Salisbury, 3 
Saugus, 23 
Scituate, 4 
Sharon, 7 
Sheffield, 2 
Shelburne, 3 
Sherborn, 4 
Somerset, 3 
Somerville, 69 
South Hadley: 

1927, 1 
1929, 1 

Southampton, 3 
Southborough, 35 
Southbridge, 5 
Spencer, 6 
Springfield, 19 
Sterling, 6 
Stoneham : 

1928, 19 

1929, 25 
Stoughton: 

1928, 55 
Stow, 6 
Swampscott, 1 
Taunton, 36 
Templeton, 17 
Topsfield, 3 
Tyngsborough 
Upton, 18 
Uxbridge, 4 
Wakefield, 42 
Wales, 5 
Walpole, 5 
Waltham, 11 
Ware, 17 



6 



30 P.D. 17. 

Wareham: Wendell, 4 Weymouth, 17 Winchendon, 16 

1928, 20 West Bridgewater, 2 Whitman, 12 Winchester, 29 

1929, 32 West Newbury, 10 Wilbraham, 6 Winthrop, 10 
Warren, 2 West Springfield, 10 Williamsburg, 23 Woburn, 76 
Washington, 11 Westborough, 12 Williamstown, 6 Worcester: 
Watertown, 19 Westfield, 7 Wilmington: 1928, 12 
Wayland, 6 Westford, 3 1927, 9 1929, 10 
Wellesley, 2 Westhampton, 5 1928, 9 

Wellfleet, 2 Weston, 2 1929, 13 

DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING. 

Charles M. Davenport, Director. 
Robert J. Watson, Executive Secretary. 
(41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston.) 
On November 30, 1929, the total number of children who were wards of the 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools was 4,246, distributed as follows: 

In the On 

School Schools Parole Total 

Lyman School for Boys 506 1,588 2,094 

Industrial School for Boys 295 949 1,244 

Industrial School for Girls 293 615 908 

1,094 3,152 4,246 

The total number in the schools on November 30, 1929, is 36 less than on No- 
vember 30, 1928; all of the schools show a decrease. 

The Board of Trustees held 12 meetings during the year in addition to 36 meet- 
ings of various committees. A total of 94 separate visits have been made to the 
three schools by members of the Board of Trustees during the year. In addition 
to these visits made by the trustees, the executive secretary of the Board has 
visited the three schools 50 times during the year. 

Boys and girls may be paroled from the training schools at the discretion of the 
trustees. Applications for parole may be made, either in person or by letter, to 
the executive secretary of the trustees, who will see that they are acted upon if 
the boy or girl has been in the training school a reasonable length of time. 

The average length of stay at Lyman School is slightly longer for 1929 than for 
1928 but a slight decrease is shown at the other schools. 

Average Length of Stay. 

Lyman Industrial 

School School Industrial School 

for Boys for Boys for Girls 

1928 11.43 mos. 9.9 mos. 1 yr. 5 mos. 15 days 

1929 12.05 mos. 9.7 mos. 1 yr. 4 mos. 13 days 

Boys' Parole Branch 

John J. Smith, Superintendent. 

On November 30, 1929, there were 1,588 boys on parole from the Lyman School 
for Boys and 949 on parole from the Industrial School for Boys, a total of 2,537. 
This is a net gain of 54 as contrasted with a net loss of 93 for the preceding year. 
From the Lyman School for Boys, 459 were paroled to their own homes, or to rela- 
tives, 73 to foster homes at wages, and 131 to foster homes at board. Three 
hundred sixty-seven (367) were paroled from the Industrial School for Boys to 
their own homes, or to relatives, and 57 placed at wages in foster homes. From 
the Industrial School for Boys it is always possible to parole a boy to a foster home 
where he can at least earn his board, but the smaller and younger boys from the 
Lyman School, who have to attend school, must necessarily be paroled to their 
own homes, or to relatives. Sufficient foster homes have been available so that 
boys have not been detained waiting for parole. 

Industrial conditions have made it extremely hard for many boys to obtain em- 
ployment, and even when they did obtain work it was usually of the most menial 
nature. In fact, many were unable to get steady work of any kind, and were 
fortunate to be employed at odd jobs. 

Honorable discharges were granted by the trustees to 54 boys on parole from 
the Lyman School for Boys and to 69 on parole from the Industrial School for 
Boys. This was encouraging, in view of poor industrial conditions and the preva- 
lence of so much crime committed by juveniles. 



Pt. I. 31 

Eighty-six (86) boys on parole were committed to other institutions during the 
year, of whom 51 were on parole from the Industrial School for Boys, and 35 on 
parole from the Lyman School for Boys. It is a question how many of these com- 
mitments could have been avoided by this department if there were more visitors 
to give closer supervision. Considering the number of boys on parole, however, 
and the number of visitors employed, it does not seem possible to expect better 
results. 

During the year 19,240 visits were made, of which 9,217 were made to boys 
under eighteen years of age on parole from the Lyman School for Boys, 3,492 to 
boys over eighteen on parole from the Lyman School for Boys, and 6,531 to boys 
on parole from the Industrial School for Boys. One thousand five hundred sixty- 
eight (1,568) home investigations were made, as well as 202 investigations of foster 
homes. Our visitors spent 775 hours looking for runaways from the Lyman School 
for Boys and the Industrial School for Boys, and 619 hours in looking for runa- 
ways from foster homes. In addition to this, they spent 1,044 hours trying to 
find jobs for boys on parole in their districts. 

On November 30, 1929, this department held for its wards 600 bank books, 
showing deposits of $27,565.42. Every effort is made to encourage boys earning 
wages in foster homes to save. 

Girls' Parole Branch. 

Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent. 

It has been, and is, the aim of the Girls' Parole Branch to give to each individual 
girl opportunities to develop a poise, a standard of morale, a point of view, and a 
goal, which will be her guide and support, when, at twenty-one, she is on her own 
resources. To attain this aim means individual study of the background, the 
personality defect, which are varying in causes and degrees, and the needs of each 
girl. But how has this been done with the greatly increased number of parolees 
and no increase in the number of workers? The last worker added to the Depart- 
ment was in 1918. Since then the number of girls on parole has increased 73 per 
cent, there being 776 individual girls and 62 babies taken care of by the Girls' 
Parole Branch during 1929. The visitors have visited their girls 6,978 times dur- 
ing the past year. They interviewed 6,385 individuals in doing their work. The 
most that we have been able to do in the past year, in many instances, has been to 
point the way, when once we accompanied the girls on the way. 

A study of the material that the Parole Branch has worked with is shown some- 
what in the mental diagnoses of 611 girls, who were mentally examined, out of the 
776 who were on parole during the year 1929. 

21 . 7% normal 20 . 7% feeble-minded 

3 . 1% supernormal 0.1% feeble-minded with epilepsy 

48 . 6% subnormal 5 . 2% psychopathic 

. 6% mentally deficient with psychosis 

When one adds to this grade of mentality the bad heredity, the degenerating 
home environment, the lack of moral training, and the fact that over 90 per cent 
of these girls had sex experiences prior to commitment, and the others were pos- 
sessed of much unwholesome sex knowledge, it is evident that the Parole Depart- 
ment has been confronted from day to day with an enormous task. 

Six hundred and fifteen (615) girls were on parole at the end of the year, Novem- 
ber 30, 1929; the average age being eighteen years and two months. Two hun- 
dred and twenty-two (222) of these were under eighteen years of age, 165 were 
under seventeen years of age, and 57 were under sixteen years of age. Three hun- 
dred and six (306) different girls have been in housework positions during the year. 
Two hundred and ninety-five (295) foster homes were used 436 times. The homes 
of 237 applicants for girls were investigated and 129 of these new homes were used. 
One hundred and sixty-six (166) homes that had been used in previous years were 
again used this year. Eighty-five (85) girls were paroled to foster homes for the 
first time. Ninety-one (91) girls were paroled for the first time to the homes of 
relatives. 

The parole of tomorrow should be better than the parole of yesterday. To bring 



32 P.D. 17. 

about a better parole for the future, many old methods must go and new ones take 
their places. First, the school must prepare the girls for other employment than 
housework — such trades as the running of power machines, dressmaking, costume 
designing, practical art courses, hairdressing and manicuring, millinery, bookkeep- 
ing and stenography, household nursing, fancy cooking, et cetera. 

It will be most important that each girl should be trained in the trade or vocation 
for which she is best fitted in general makeup and mentality. This can be de- 
termined by the psychiatrist and psychologist working with the officers of the in- 
stitution. The girls who dislike housework, as most of them do, being equipped 
with a trade when paroled, will be better able to find and keep employment. For 
the girl who has no relative's home to which she may be paroled, the Parole De- 
partment must find a foster family where she can board. The foster-home plac- 
ing of girls who do housework for wages is becoming more and more unsatisfactory 
in this day of bridge plajdng and golf. 

The rehabilitation of girls' homes must be done. To do this, the full time of 
one worker will be needed. It is short-sightedness for a state department or pri- 
vate organization to go on rebuilding and educating the girls and leaving the 
families out of the program. The salary of a worker could be saved if more girls 
were paroled to their relatives, by the saving of the expense of outfits and trunks 
which are not furnished to girls when paroled to their relatives. 

The old idea that the girl must live in a foster home to get the proper amount of 
protection that she needs has failed in too many cases to warrant its continuance. 
In this day of electrical appliances to make housework easier and quicker, the em- 
ployer has more time to be away from home, and our girl is left unguarded to care 
for the home. 

On November 30, 1929, there were 302 active bank accounts of the girls on parole, 
amounting to $14,609.62. Thirty-eight (38) girls had between $100 and $200; 
5 girls had between $200 and $300; and 3 girls had $300 or over. Twenty-nine 
(29) of the 60 girls who reached their majority during the year had $796.50 in the 
bank. 

HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING. 

Edward T. Hartman, Consultant on Planning. 

The year shows the establishment of five new planning boards, in Canton, Orange, 
Scituate, Sudbury, and Westboro, making 112 in all. But, as will be shown, this 
does not mean that there are 112 boards functioning. 

Four new comprehensive zoning laws have been adopted, in Lincoln, Westwood, 
Revere and Lynnfield, while Barnstable adopted a somewhat elementary form of 
interim law. Revere replaces an interim law with a comprehensive law. New- 
buryport repealed her interim law without adopting any other form of zoning. 
This brings the list of places in Massachusetts with some kind of zoning to 67, 
covering 70 per cent of the population of the state. Twenty-eight places have 
prepared zoning schemes which have not been adopted.. 

Amending Zoning By-Laws. 

By chapter 39, Acts of 1929, the provisions for amending local by-laws were 
changed. This renders void any provisions in local by-laws in regard to amend- 
ments. The new provision, section 30 of chapter 40, General Laws, as amended 
by chapter 39, Acts of 1929, is that an amendment to a by-law or a town zoning 
map may be brought directly before a town meeting without a hearing. How- 
ever, if previous to the time of the town meeting any objector files objection in 
writing with the Town Clerk, the matter cannot be acted upon until the objectors 
are heard by a special committee or by the planning board, and a report is ren- 
dered to the town meeting. 

Planning Boards. 

Places required to have planning boards under the law and now without them 
are Adams, Beverly, Cambridge, Chelsea, Dan vers, Greenfield, and Marlboro. 
All of these places, except Danvers, have, at some time in the past, had planning 
boards. The Beverly, Cambridge and Greenfield boards resigned en masse be- 
cause of dissatisfaction with the way their recommendations were received by the 
city governments and the people. 



Pt. I. 33 

While there are 112 boards, a few of them have only a nominal existence. Two 
at least were established merely to comply with the law, with the definite under- 
standing that nothing should be done. Several of the boards have succeeded in 
doing nothing because of lack of initiative on the part of the members and lack of 
stimulus on the part of the public. 

Contrasted with boards that consistently use every effort to keep sound sug- 
gestions before the people are those that make some hasty proposal and, when it 
fails of acceptance, quit entirely. Proposals should be worked out with care and 
presented to the people in such a way as to secure acceptance of the proposal or 
suggestions that will improve it so that it will be accepted. 

It is a part of the duty of a planning board to consider matters in every single 
instance. If in the meantime citizens or officials bring matters they have under 
consideration to the board for cooperative consideration, all the better. But the 
planning board may not absolve itself because things have been done without 
consulting it. If the board is up-to-date it will constantly keep development 
problems before the town, and it will find itself with a more or less definite opin- 
ion on any matter presented to it. If it is not this kind of a board it is time for 
the townspeople to act. 

Zoning Administration. 

While every place needs zoning and will never grow properly without it, the 
greatest need of the moment is proper zoning administration. Zoning schemes 
are constantly being broken down by those who seek special privilege. People of 
all stations, members of boards who see a chance to make some money from a 
contract for work, reformers, educational institutions, prominent citizens who 
should be above such things, and those persons who regularly seek special privi- 
lege, calmly apply for permits in violation of the law. Frequently they get what 
they request. If refused, they appeal and frequently get from the board of appeals 
a permit to violate the law, under the guise of a variation. If they fail here, they 
go to the legislative body and get a change in the law. Such changes are seldom 
in accordance with a sound scheme of growth. They are and always will be mainly 
special privilege granted by careless, mistaken, favoring or corrupt officials or 
legislative bodies. 

Boards of Appeal. 

Boards of appeal should note that they may vary the strict terms of the law where 
odd-shaped lots or other conditions raise difficulties, but they cannot change the 
law. That is for the legislative body. To permit a business in a residential dis- 
trict is a change in the law. 

The Massachusetts statute permits variations from the requirements of a local 
law by a board of appeals only when they may meet a physical difficulty or avoid 
an unnecessary hardship, and then only in case what is done is in accord with the 
purpose and intent of the zoning law. 

The intent of zoning is to protect the health, safety and general welfare of the 
people, to prevent congestion and confusion, to guard against fire, to provide 
light and ventilation, and to see to it that those who observe the law have the 
protection of the law. If Brown observes the law and builds a one-family house 
with a proper set-back and side and rear yards, and a hundred others have done 
the same, why should Jones be allowed to buy a vacant lot in their midst and 
erect a ten-story apartment covering the entire lot, and for a hundred families? 
In such a case, Jones is given special privilege. He is permitted to steal his light 
and air from his law-abiding neighbors, to increase the fire and traffic hazards, to 
create a nuisance, or in the words of the U. S. Supreme Court, "put the pig in the 
parlor instead of in the barn-yard." 

The Value of Zoning. 
Ask real estate men operating in Metropolitan Boston as to the best place to 
live. They will mention no unzoned place. The reason is that all wise real es- 
tate men know that the only thing that will make a desirable residential area is 
some sort of protection, such as is found in private restrictions and zoning. Un- 
fortunately, some zoned places will not be mentioned, because they waited too 
long. Some very fine places will not be mentioned, because they are without pro- 



34 P.D. 17. 

tection. Zoning has never been considered or has been defeated by some selfish 
interest seeking to mine the town just as we mined our forests. After that is done 
there is little hope. It takes many years to overcome such conditions. 

The Effect of Main Highways on Village Life. 

In considering this question, the chief point of interest is village life. The vil- 
lages of Massachusetts have many unique and desirable qualities. The outsider, 
when he approaches a New England village, is impressed by the beauty of the 
roadside scenery, the quiet village streets arched with elms and lined with attrac- 
tive homes. It is these characteristics plus the climate, the hills and the water- 
fronts of Massachusetts which are bringing increasing numbers of American people 
to spend their summers in Massachusetts. 

Before the coming of the automobile, Massachusetts was developing an efficient 
highway system. These main highways naturally tied in with existing roads, in 
fact, consisted largely of improved roads. Village main streets were used the 
same as country highways. This was satisfactory in the day of the horse and 
carriage but where it means anywhere from five hundred to fifteen hundred auto- 
mobiles per hour, it is an entirely different problem. 

Unthinking people are too apt to work on the assumption that it is too expen- 
sive to build new highways. If people would think this matter through, they 
would see that in the end we cannot afford not to build new highways. In short, 
every village should be by-passed by the main highway and such highways should 
have spur-roads leading into the village centers. If this is not done, the villages 
will be ruined, their elms will be cut down, their homes rendered uninhabitable, 
and the expense of re-establishing all this village life will be infinitely greater, and 
will extend over a much longer period of time, and will produce much greater 
unhappiness than can possibly be produced by building new highways. Many of 
the country roads as they now stand may be used for these main highways. The 
chief point of importance is to by-pass the village centers and save them. 





Boards Established 




No Board 


Active 


Inactive 




Amesbury 


Holyoke 


Reading* 


Andover 


Adams 


Amherst* 


Lawrence 


Revere 


Ashland* 


Beverly 


Arlington 


Leominster 


Salem 


Auburn* 


Cambridge 


Attleboro 


Lexington* 


Saugus 


Dartmouth* 


Chelsea 


Barnstable* 


Longmeadow* 


Scituate* 


Dennis* 


Danvers 


Bedford* 


Lowell 


Shrewsbury* 


Gardner 


Greenfield 


Belmont 


Lynn 


Somerville 


Great Barrington* 


Marlborough 


Boston 


Lynnfield* 


Southbridge 


Hudson* 




Bourne* 


Maiden 


Springfield 


Mansfield* 




Braintree 


Marblehead* 


Stoneham* 


Medfield* 




Bridgewater* 


Medford 


Sudbury* 


Middleborough* 




Brockton 


Melrose 


Taunton 


Milford 




Brookline 


Methuen 


Tisbury* 


Nantucket* 




Canton* 


Milton 


Wakefield 


Newburyport 




Chicopee 


Nahant* 


Walpole* 


Northbridge 




Clinton 


Natick 


Waltham 


Peabody 




Dedham 


Needham* 


Watertown 


Stoughton* 




Duxbury* 


New Bedford 


Wayland* 


Webster 




Easthampton 


Newton 


Wellesley* 


Weymouth 




East Longmeadow 51 


North Adams 


Westborough* 






Everett 


Northampton 


Westfield 






Fairhaven 


No. Attleborough* 


Weston* 






Fall River 


Norwood 


West Springfield 






Falmouth* 


Oak Bluffs* 


Westwood* 






Fitehburg 


Orange* 


Wilmington* 






Framingham 


Palmer 


Winchester 






Franklin* 


Paxton* 


Winthrop 






Gloucester 


Pittsfield 


Woburn 






Haverhill 


Plymouth 


Worcester 






Hingham* 


Quincy 


Yarmouth* 







* Under 10,000 population. 



Pt. I. 



35 



Cities and Towns which have been Zoned. 



Comprehensive 


Comprehensive 


Prepared but 


Not Adopted 


Brockton 


Nov., 


1920 


Westwood 


June, 


1929 


Amesbury 




Brookline 


May, 


1922 


Revere 


July, 


1929 


Amherst 




Longmeadow 


July, 


1922 


Winthrop 


Oct., 


1929 


Andover 




Springfield 


Dec, 


1922 


Lynnfield 


Nov., 


1929 


Attleboro 




Newton 


Dec, 
May, 


1922 
1923 








Beverly 
Bourne 




West Springfield 










Cambridge 


Jan., 


1924 


Use 






Braintree 




Lexington 


Mar., 


1924 








Chatham 




Melrose 


Mar., 


1924 








Chelsea 












Winchester 


Mar., 


1924 








Chicopee 




Arlington 
Boston 


May, 
June, 


1924 
1924 


Milton 
Holyoke 


July, 

Sept. 


1922 
1923 


Clinton 
Duxbury 




Woburn 


Jan., 


1925 


Swampscott 


Apr., 


1924 


Easthampton 




Belmont 


Jan., 


1925 


Dedham 


May, 


1924 


Fitchburg 




Needham 


Mar., 


1925 


Chelsea 


June, 
Dec, 


1924 


Framingham 




Walpole 


Mar. 


1925 


Paxton 


1924 


Gardner 




Stoneham 


Mar. 


1925 


Worcester 


Dec, 


1924 


Hingham 




Waltham 


July, 


1925 


Wellesley 


Mar., 


1925 


Leominster 




Haverhill 


Oct., 


1925 


Salem 


Nov., 


1925 


Littleton 




Medford 


Oct., 


1925 


Hudson 


Mar., 


1927 


Marion 




Wakefield 


Nov. 


1925 


Bedford 




1928 


Medfield 




North Adams 


Dec, 
Dec, 


1925 
1925 








Nahant 
Northampton 




Somerville 










New Bedford 


Dec, 


1925 


Partial 






Plymouth 




Watertown 


Jan., 


1926 








Quincy 




Fairhaven 


Feb., 


1926 








Southbridge 




Falmouth 


Apr., 


1926 


Marshfield 


June, 


1926 


Wilmington 




Reading 


May, 


1926 


Fall River 


Sept. 


1927 


Yarmouth 




Lynn 


June, 


1926 












Lowell 


July, 


1926 




















Maiden 


July, 


1926 












Everett 


July, 


1926 


Interim 










Norwood 


May, 

Nov. 


1927 
1927 












Gloucester 










Pittsfield 


Dec, 


1927 


Westfield 


July, 


1922 






Marblehead 


Apr., 


1928 


Taunton 


Sept. 


1925 






Weston 


Apr., 


1928 


Marlborough 


Jan., 


1927 






Concord 


Apr., 


1928 


Andover 


Mar. 


1927 






Agawam 


Apr., 


1928 


Petersham 


Mar. 


1927 






East Longmeadow 


Apr., 


1928 


Oak Bluffs 


Apr., 


1927 






Saugus 


June 


1928 


Northampton 


Sept. 


1927 






Lincoln 


Mar. 


1929 


Barnstable 


June, 


1929 







Housing Experiment at Lowell. 

The condition of the housing experiment at Lowell remains unchanged with 
payments on the houses erected going on regularly. 

A statement of the money spent and the money paid back into the State Treasury 
is as follows: 

Appropriation (made in 1917) $50,000 00 

Expenses: 

Land purchased, 7 acres with room for 40 houses, including also one house 

standing on lot $12,500 00 

Cost of 12 houses 28,128 77 

Improvements .......... 2,626 77 

43,255 54 

Balance returned to State treasury ......... $6,744 46 

Sale price of houses and lots $36,862 30 

Amount paid on principal ............ 24,074 17 

Principal remaining unpaid Dec 1, 1928 $12,788 13 

Paid back to State treasury in monthly installments: 

Interest $12,617 64 

Principal 24,074 17 

$36,691 SI 



THE FIVE INSTITUTIONS. 

A brief statement relating to the general supervision of each institution will 
be followed by comparative and more detailed consideration of financial adminis- 
tration. Further details about the work of the various institutions may be found 
in the institution reports which are published separately. 



36 P.D. 17. 

THE STATE INFIRMARY, TEWKSBURY. 

John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent. 
Trustees. 
G. Forrest Martin, M.D., Lowell, Chairman. 
Mrs. Nellie E. Talbot, Brookline, Secretary. 
Francis W. Anthony, M.D., Haverhill. 
Mrs. Mary E. Cogan, Stoneham. 
Walter F. Dearborn, M.D., Cambridge. 
Mr. Robert G. Stone, Brookline. 
Mr. Dennis D. Sullivan, Middleborough. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $2,581,573.32 
Normal capacity of plant, 2,800. Value per unit of capacity, $921.99 
Provides infirmary care for indigent persons not chargeable for support to any 
city or town. 

Numbers. 

Males Females Total 

Number Dec. 1, 1928 1,587 1,048 2,635 

Admitted during year 2,061 669 2,730 

Discharged during year 2,010 659 2,669 

Remaining Nov. 30, 1929 1,638 1,008 2,696 

Individuals under care during year ....... - 5,072 

Daily average inmates during year ....... 1,527 1,040 2,567 

Daily average employees during year ...... 204.01 262.35 466.36 

Largest census during year ........ - - 2,816 

Smallest census during year ........ - - 2,375 

Of the 5,365 cases cared for during the year, 4,433 were in the general hospital 
wards; of which 3,308 were males and 1,125 were females. Of this number, 858 
were discharged well, 578 were improved, 617 not improved, 490 died, and 1,890 
remained in the hospital, at the end of the year. Of the number cared for in the 
hospital, there were 470 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, 11 of influenza, 3 of ery- 
sipelas, 57 of measles, and 4 of chicken pox. There were also 125 cases of alco- 
holism. Of the number of deaths, 96 were due to tuberculosis of the lungs. 

There is a decrease of 73 in the daily average number of patients in the institu- 
tion as compared with the preceding year. 

In the men's hospital there is an increase in the number of the very aged and 
those requiring a longer duration of care or treatment. It is becoming more diffi- 
cult to meet the requirements. With a capacity of 427 beds, 2,468 cases were re- 
ceived and treated there during the year. 

Although there was a slight decrease in cancer cases, there have always been 
enough to more than fill the small cancer ward where only 10 beds are available 
for these patients. 

There have been treated 23 cases of diabetes, requiring diabetic diet, insulin 
treatment and continuous hospital care. There has been an increase in the num- 
ber of such cases which are now being sent to the Infirmary. Marked success has 
followed the Minot-Murphy diet for cases of pernicious anaemia. A daily average 
of 6 diabetic patients are taking insulin and diabetic treatment, and are being 
taught the principles and technique of these treatments that they may treat them- 
selves in their own homes later. 

An eye clinic is held once a week for the examination and treatment of diseases 
of the eye and for prescribing and supplying glasses to patients in need of them. 
As many as forty patients attend this clinic in one day. The X-ray department is 
under the direction of a physician who devotes two afternoons each week for cases 
requiring consultation, advice and treatment. This clinic is increasing in at- 
tendance. 

An active venereal clinic is likewise maintained, with creditable results. 

Fifty-five major surgical operations and over 300 minor surgical and accidental 
cases were cared for during the year in the men's department, and 42 major and 
78 minor operations were performed in the women's hospital. 

There were 110 births at this institution during the year, 61 males and 49 fe- 
males. Of this number, 107 were living births, namely 59 males and 48 females. 
Among the mothers of these children, 79 were born in the United States, 6 in Ire- 
land, 19 in British Provinces, and 6 in other countries. 



Pt. I. 



37 



Of the 470 treated in the department for tuberculosis, 60 were classified as mini- 
mal; 96 as moderately advanced; and 314 far advanced. In the men's depart- 
ment 331 tubercular cases were admitted, while in the women's department there 
were 106 admissions. Eight (8) were discharged as arrested; 20 relieved; 33 not 
relieved, and 96 died. There were also 33 cases of non-pulmonary tuberculosis 
treated. 

In the department for the insane there were 61 admissions, with a daily average 
of 792, 240 males and 552 females. Forty-five (45) died. Of the 61 admissions, 
51 were first admissions; 2 readmissions, and 6 transferred from other hospitals 
for the insane. Twelve were discharged from the books ; 1 , as well ; 7, as improved ; 
1, as unimproved; and 3 were transferred to other hospitals for the insane, their 
condition being unchanged. An average of 145 men and 264 women were pro- 
ductively employed during the year. 

The dental department has been busy attending to the wants of the inmates. 

The farm has been very productive this year. The dairy herd is accredited 
free from tuberculosis since 1924 and comprises 160 head of stock of which 29 are 
pure bred. 

The lodge for men, authorized in 1928, was completed this year. This building 
has a capacity for 384 men and relieves us of more than one-half of the over- 
crowding which has existed for many years in the men's pavilion, and has made 
it possible to classify and arrange for the more rugged men in this new lodge called 
"Stonecroft," and separate them from the more aged and feeble patients remaining 
in the men's pavilion which is closely connected with the hospital department. 
Those who are able to work, render assistance, or act as helpers, and they are cared 
for in the new building. 

On May 1, the seventy-fifth anniversary of the opening of the State Infirmary 
was celebrated with a large gathering of officials and friends. The Board of Trus- 
tees gave a luncheon in the new building, followed by a program in the chapel. 
The continuous growth of this institution in 75 years was considered, together 
with the magnitude of its work. 

With an appropriation of $1,007,100 plus $16,063.44 brought forward from the 
balance of 1928, the total amount available for maintenance was $1,023,163.44. 
Of this amount $991,673.58 was expended. Of the amount expended, $432,468.25 
was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $559,205.33. Net weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $7,378. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$118,795.19. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $872,878.39. Ratio 
of daily average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 
5.5. The trustees estimate that $1,127,712 will be necessary for maintenance in 
1930. 

In compliance with section 4, chapter 29, of the General Laws, the following 
estimates for special objects and items are submitted: 



1. Maternity Ward 

2. Extension to Men's Hospital (80 bed 

3. Extension to Laundry Building 

4. Industrial Building 

5. Storage Building 

6. Land to protect water supply . 

7. Walks and driveways 

8. Extension to Women's Hospital 

9. Improvements to Women's Hospital 



3) 

















$20,000 00 

70,000 00 

6,000 00 

45,000 00 

24,200 00 

2,000 00 

4.000 00 

80,000 00 

20,000 00 

$271,200 00 



INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT AT THE STATE FARM, BRIDGEWATER. 

(Under the Department of Correction.) 
Henry J. Strann, Superintendent. 

Provides infirmary care for indigent persons (male) not chargeable to any city 
or town. The data following are for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1929. 



38 



P.D. 17. 



Numbers 



Number Oct. 1, 1928 .... 
Admitted during year .... 
Discharged during year 
Remaining Sept. 30, 1929 . 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year ' . 
Largest census during year . 
Deaths during year (included in discharged) 



158 

45 

70 

133 

203 

143 

162 

37 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON. 

John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent. 
Trustees. 
Mr. Walter C. Baylies, Taunton, Chairman. 
Mr. George H. Ellis, Newton. 
Mr. William F. Fitzgerald, Brookline. 
Mr. Andrew Marshall, Boston. 
Robert Soutter, M.D., Boston. 

Opened December 1, 1907. Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $753,- 
327.79. Normal capacity of plant, 316. Value per unit of capacity, $2,383.94. 

Provides care and schooling for crippled and deformed children of the Common- 
wealth; those between the ages of five and fifteen and mentally competent to at- 
tend public schools are eligible for admission. Medical and surgical treatment 
for minor wards under the care of the Division of Child Guardianship is also 
provided. 

Numbers. 

Males Females Total 

Number Dec. 1, 1928 145 134 279 

Admitted during year 369 321 690 

Discharged during year ......... 394 303 697 

Remaining Nov. 30, 1929 120 152 272 

Individuals under care during year ....... - - 969 

Daily average inmates during year . 143.07 140.23 283.30 

Daily average employees during year . . . . . . 36.20 73.96 110.16 

Largest census during year ........ - - 325 

Smallest census during year ....... - - 159 

Of the 969 cases cared for during the year, 697 were discharged, — 615 from 
hospital care and 82 from the school. There have been admitted 690 children, — 
574 to the hospital and 116 to the school. There remained at the close of the year, 
228 crippled and deformed children in the school and 44 sick minor wards in the 
hospital. The average age of all children admitted during the year was 9 years, 
2 months and 17 days; the youngest being 6 weeks, and the oldest, 20 years, 2 
months and 17 days. 

Exclusive of 25 whose birthplaces are unknown, 561, or 82^ per cent, of the 
680 children actually admitted were born in Massachusetts; 77, or 13 per cent, 
were born in other parts of the United States and 17, or 2)4 per cent, came from 
foreign countries. 

With the increase in the number of recent victims of the disease popularly known 
as infantile paralysis, it became necessary to relieve the medical and nursing service 
by extending the work of the physiotherapist, and a full-time resident assistant in 
that department was appointed last year. Her time during the past year has 
been about equally divided between individual attention to special cases and the 
supervision of group activities on the playgrounds. 

To supplement the work of the dentist, a full-time dental hygienist has been ap- 
pointed; her services being another important factor in the constructive foundation 
arranged for these children. 

Many graduates and former pupils return each year to call at the school for 
which they give evidence of an affectionate regard. At the beginning of the school 
year one graduate, after obtaining her degree from Leland Stanford University, 
crossed the continent to join the Massachusetts Hospital School staff as head 
teacher. After an absence of nine years, a young man travelled several hundred 
miles for a visit of but a few hours to report the progress he was making at self- 
support, directly as a result of the training given at this school. Scores of similar 
evidence of loyalty and devotion to the school might be given. 



Pt. I. 39 

The farm continues to supply some valued products: 83,157 quarts of milk 
have been produced, which is high above the maximum standard for butter fat, 
comes from a healthy source, is pasteurized and then consumed within twelve 
hours. 

Every child received at the institution, whether an orthopedic case for the 
school department or a minor ward for hospital care only, is entered through the 
Bradford Infirmary. On first admission a complete physical examination is made 
as a routine procedure including X-ray, laboratory analyses, dental examination 
and other diagnostic measures. School cases usually are held at the infirmary 
until they have passed the incubation period of the common contagious diseases. 
During this period following the initial examination, the social worker, having 
previously seen the child at home, is helpful in making new adjustments pleasant; 
the dental hygienist takes up her duties with the child and the necessary braces, 
splints and orthopedic appliances are prescribed by the physicians for the work of 
the apparatus shop. Any surgical procedure for the correction of deformities 
usually is not begun until a child has become well established in school. When 
a surgical operation has been decided upon, or a child's illness demands special 
medical and nursing care, he may be and frequently is readmitted to the infirmary 
by transfer from the school department. 

Recently it has become the fashion to place much emphasis upon the value of 
ultra-violet light as a therapeutic measure in the treatment of orthopedic children. 
Our carefully tabulated observations in the use of the artificial light rays would be 
disappointing to some advocates of that method of treatment. Doubtless the 
wide difference between our results and those made by other observers may be 
explained by the healthful out-door conditions under which our children live both 
day and night compared with the shut-in environment of many slum-stunted chil- 
dren attending other clinics. While we continue to prescribe the ultra-violet 
light, as well as massage, muscle training and graduated exercises in certain selected 
cases, they have not been employed as substitutes for a child's natural instinct for 
play, which always has been an important factor in the life of the school. 

Public interest in the welfare of crippled children is becoming widespread not 
only in this Commonwealth, which was a pioneer in a sadly neglected field, but in 
other states of the Union where both public and private agencies for the relief of 
cripples are being established with commendable enthusiasm. The crippled child 
in any community presents a complex social and economic problem, a solution of 
which should not be undertaken without most careful consideration of many im- 
portant factors. In May of this year, a survey was started which will be of great 
value in determining the future of a large number of deserving children, illiterate, 
or improperly taught on account of physical disabilities, who by proper care can 
be made helpful to the community. 

In reviewing a list of our 345 graduates, it is very striking to note that of the 
earlier classes at the school, where the persons are of an age to be established in 
life, practically every one now living is self-supporting. Many of the young men 
are married and are supporting families as well. Some graduates who have died 
were also prospering and on the way to a promising future. Of the twenty- two 
women graduates married, it is safe to say that the domestic training received at 
the school has been invaluable, though some still work outside the home. One, 
widowed and left with a little daughter, has an excellent and responsible position 
as bookkeeper. Of those graduates whose physical handicap has been too great to 
permit of entire self-support, or whose home conditions allow them to remain 
there, there is no doubt that in most cases their Hospital School training has much 
diminished the burden of their support, and in many cases it probably enables 
them to render an equivalent for their maintenance. 

With an appropriation of $196,500, plus $3,791.06 brought forward from balance 
of 1928, the total amount available for maintenance was $200,291.06. Of this 
amount $192,013.54 was expended. Of the amount expended $108,364.40 was for 
salaries, wages and labor; $83,649.14 for all other expenses. Net weekly per 
capita cost of maintenance, $12,963. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, $77,970.97. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$114,042.57. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily aver- 



40 



P.D. 17. 

The trustees estimated the sum of $205,952.90 for 



age number of inmates, 2.5. 
maintenance in 1930. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following estimate, with a request 
for special appropriation covering the same: 

Cottage for 30 Convalescent Children §50,000 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, WESTBOROUGH. 

Charles A. Keeler, Superintendent. 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 
Mr. James W. McDonald, Marlborough, Chairman. 
Mr. Clarence J. McKenzie, Winthrop, V ice-Chairman. 
Mr. William S. L. Brayton, Fall River. 
Mrs. Josephine Bleakie Colburn, Wellesley Hills. 
Mr. Eugene T. Connolly, Beverly. 
Mr. Charles M. Davenport, Boston. 
Mr. Benjamin F. Felt, Melrose. 
Mr. Ransom C. Pingree, Boston. 
Miss Amy Ethel Taylor, Lexington. 
Mr. Robert J. Watson, 41 Mt. Vernon Street, Executive Secretary. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $762,413.28. Normal capacity, 480. 
Value per unit of capacity, $1,588.36. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent. boys under fifteen 
years of age. Cottage plan. 

Numbers. 

Number Dec. 1, 192S 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining Nov. 30, 192^ 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year 

At no time during the last ten years has the number of boys been so great as 
during the past year. The daily average was twenty-four more than the previous 
year. 

Of the 864 cases received during the year, 326 were committed by courts, listed 
as follows: assault and battery, 4; breaking and entering, 103; delinquent child, 
2; indecent assault, 3 ; larceny, 125; lewdness, 4; malicious injury to property, 4; 
manslaughter, 1; malicious mischief, 3; ringing false alarm of fire, 2; running 
away, 10; setting fires, 1; stubbornness, 29; trespass on railroad, 2; unlawful 
appropriation of autos, 30; unlawfully carrying a revolver, 2; violation of rules 
and regulations of the Hampden County Training School, 1. 

Of the above, 274 had been arrested before and 29 had been inmates of other 
institutions. Seventy-three (73), or 22 per cent, were of American parentage; 
198, or 60 per cent, were foreign born; and the parentage of 6 was unknown. 
Eleven (11) of the boys were foreign born, and 315 were born in the United States. 
In addition to the court commitments, 359 were returned from places, 116 runa- 
ways captured, 40 returned from hospitals, 2 returned from leave of absence, 17 
returned from funerals and 4 returned from other institutions. 

Of the new commitments this year, 54 boys were eleven years of age or under. 
These young boys are» taken care of in two cottages, one seven miles and the other 
three miles from the main school. They do not mingle with the older boys. 

The average length of stay in the Lyman School of boys paroled for the first 
time during the year ending November 30, 1929, was 12.05 months. 

Of the 879 cases discharged or released during the year, 459 were released on 
parole to parents and relatives; released on parole to others than relatives, 73; 
boarded out, 131; runaways, 125; released to hospitals, 39; transferred to other 
institutions, 29; released to funerals, 17; granted leave of absence, 2; released to 
court on habeas, 4. 

The increasing size of our institution has given us many problems in our school 



Males 


Females 


Total 


521 


- 


521 


864 


— 


864 


879 


— 


879 


503 


- 


506 


824 


— 


824 


522.97 


— 


522.97 


66.63 


43.34 


109.97 


565 


— 


565 


483 


- 


483 



Pt. I. 



41 



during the past year. The ideal class, for the type of boy received at this school, 
should be no larger than twenty-five in the grades, and fifteen in the special classes. 
It will be necessary to have more classrooms and extra teachers if the numbers 
continue to increase. It has been possible to adapt the school to meet, at least 
temporarily, the difficulties presented. 

A new detail group has been formed, consisting of boys who, in the opinion of 
the psychiatrist and principal, have reached their school limit. It is planned to 
open one other sloyd room and hire one extra teacher. This will take care of the 
school problem boys, by dividing their time between manual work and personally 
supervised study. 

The school test given by the psychiatrist has been revised and amended so that 
it will more nearly fit the type of boy received here. 

During the year the Legislature made an appropriation for a brick cottage to 
house 50 boys. This is now in process of construction, and will be ready for oc- 
cupancy in the early summer. 

With an appropriation of $244,600, plus $10.00 brought forward from last year, 
the amount available for maintenance was $244,610. Of this amount, $239,270.95 
was expended. Of the amount expended $114,878.13 was for salaries, wages and 
labor; all other expenses, $124,392.82. Net weekly per capita cost of maintenance 
computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, $8,745. Total 
receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $998.27. Net cost of 
maintenance to the Commonwealth, $238,272.68. Ratio of daily average number 
of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 4.7. The trustees 
estimate that $264,300 will be necessary for maintenance in 1930. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following estimate, with request 
for a special appropriation covering the same: 

$8,000 oo 

50,000 oo 

55,000 00 

$113,000 00 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY. 

George P. Campbell, Superintendent. 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 
Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $695,247.71. Normal capacity of 
plant, 290. Value per unit of capacity, $2,397.40. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over fifteen and under 
twenty-one years of age. Only boys under eighteen may be admitted. 



1. Improvements to Power Plant . 

2. Assembly and Chapel Building 

3. Brick cottage (30 small boys) . 





* 






Males 


Females 


Total 


. 


- 


302 










485 


— 


485 










492 


— 


492 










295 


— 


295 










758 


— 


758 










295 


— 


295 










58 


20 


78 










314 


— 


314 










280 


- 


280 



Number Dec. 1, 1928 
Admitted during year . . 

Discharged during year . 
Remaining Nov. 30, 1929 
Individuals under care during year . 
Daily average inmates during year . 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year 

The list of causes of admission in the 355 cases committed during the year was 
as follows: assault, 4; assault and battery, 5; attempt to break and enter, 4; 
attempted larceny, 4; being a runaway, 7; being an idle and disorderly person, 1; 
breaking and entering, 35; breaking and entering and larceny, 56; carrying a dan- 
gerous weapon, 1; destroying property, 2; disturbing the peace, 3; drunkenness, 
2; failure on parole, 16; indecent assault, 4; larceny, 83; lewdness, 1; receiving 
stolen goods, 2; robbery, 1; stubborn, disobedient and delinquent, 33; unlawful 
appropriation of auto, 63; unnatural act, 2; vagrancy, 5; violation of probation, 1; 
violating auto laws, 18; wilful injury to property, 2. 

In addition to the above, 105 boys were returned from parole, 10 returned from 
leave of absence, 13 returned from hospitals and 2 from court. Three hundred 
thirty-nine (339) of those received during the year were committed by the courts. 
Of the boys thus committed, 286 had been in court before, and 59 had been in- 
mates of other institutions. Twenty-six (26), or 7.3 per cent, of the 355 boys 



42 P.D. 17. 

received were foreign born, and 329, or 92.7 per cent, were born in the United 
States. Sixty-two (62), or 17.5 per cent, were of American parentage; 182, or 51 
per cent, were of foreign born parents; while the parentage of 37 was unknown. 
The average length of stay of boys in the school was 9.7 months. 

Of the 492 boys discharged or released during the year, 323 were paroled; re- 
turned cases re-paroled, 101; granted leave of absence, 10; transferred to Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory, 16; committed to Department for Defective Delinquents, 
at Bridge water, 5; transferred to other institutions, not penal, 17; taken to court 
on habeas and not returned, 4; taken to court on habeas and returned later, 1; 
absent without leave, 14; died, 1. 

The past year has been unusually satisfactory because of the high level of con- 
duct maintained by the boys, with consequent profit to themselves, as well as the 
large number of tasks accomplished. The most important factor in this result 
has probably been the general stability and ability of the staff. The number of 
staff replacements has been materially lessened, tending to give us a group of 
people who, because they are acquainted with the boys and their problems, are 
more interested and more efficient than they could otherwise be. 

The old Shaker buildings which were moved to new locations have all been re- 
modeled and made into dwellings for employees, giving good quarters for three 
additional families. 

A wing, 60 feet long by 31 feet wide, one and one-half stories and basement, is 
being built on the hospital at the Industrial School for Girls. A force of 12 to 35 
boys from the Industrial School for Boys has been at work since last June on this 
project, and it will probably take to the end of February, 1930, to complete it. 

With an appropriation of $165,000 plus $195.91 brought forward from balance 
of 1928, the amount available for maintenance was $165,195.91. Of this amount 
$161,632.89 was expended. Of the amount expended, $74,420.05 was for salaries, 
wages and labor; all other expenses, $87,212.84. Net weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, 
$10,460. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $774.83. 
Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $160,803.11. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3.7. 
The trustees estimate that $171,448.75 will be necessary for maintenance in 1930. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER. 

Miss Catharine M. Campbell, Superintendent. 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 
Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $514,3S7.32. Normal capacity of 
plant, 263. Value per unit of capacity, $2,059.91. Founded in 1854 as a private 
institution. Taken over by the State in 1856. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent girls under seven- 
teen years of age at time of commitment. 

Numbers. 

Males Females Total 

Number Dec. 1, 192S 307 307 

Admitted during year - 298 298 

Discharged during year ......... - 312 312 

Remaining Nov. 30, 1929 - 293 293 

Individuals under care during year ....... - 558 558 

Daily average inmates during year ....... - 308 308 

Daily average employees during year ...... 26 53 79 

Largest census during year - 327 327 

Smallest census during year - 292 292 

The list of causes of admission for 199 commitments of the 298 cases received 
at the school during the year is as follows : breaking and entering and larceny, 1 ; 
delinquent, 25; drunkenness, 2; false fire alarm, 1; fornication, 11; idle and dis- 
orderly, 4; larceny, 13; lewdness, 35; runaway, 21; stubborn, 78; transferred 
from Division of Child Guardianship, 4 (delinquent; stubborn; runaway, 2); 
vagrancy, 3; violation of the True Name Law, 1. 

Of the above, 80, or 40 per cent, were of American parentage; 72, or 36 per 
cent, were of foreign parentage, and the parentage of 3 were unknown. 

Recalled to the school, 49, — from court, 2; from running from the school, 6; 
from hospitals, 37; for a visit, 2; from visit home 2. In addition to the above 50 



Pt. I. 43 

were returned from parole: viz., for medical care, 8; to await commitment to in- 
stitutions, 6; for further training, 22; for violation of parole, 14. 

The average length of stay in the school of all girls was 1 year, 4 months and 
13 days. 

Of the 312 girls released from the school during the year, 105 were released on 
parole to parents or relatives; on parole to parents to attend school, 17; on parole 
to other families for wages, 108; on parole to other families to attend school, 11; 
for a visit home, 2; from visit to Industrial School, 1; to attend court, 2; ran 
from Industrial School for Girls, 9; transferred to hospitals, 45; committed to 
school for feeble-minded, 1; committed to the department for female defective 
delinquents, 4; transferred to Reformatory for Women, 2; committed to hos- 
pital for insane, 5. 

Academic work alone does not meet our needs. The re-education and restora- 
tion of our girls along social lines is the large problem presented. How may we 
best equip them that they may return to the community as a valued part of the 
community? The answer has not been found for the entire number. The majority, 
it is felt, must be trained sufficiently well that with the exception of the very 
young girls, they may be returned to the community as self-supporting. 

Character formation, being a slow process, allows no short-cut, but rather evolves 
from and is the direct result of the training given and the ability of the child to 
respond. The close contact and personal attention to the individual girl by the 
superintendent and assistant superintendent, the care and intimate understanding 
of the matron and other workers in the cottage, the supervision of the physician 
and nurses, the invaluable spiritual help afforded by the several clergymen, and 
last, but by no means least, the untiring efforts of the principal and teachers, are 
the contributing factors in the accomplishment of this development. 

The hospital is in process of reconstruction and enlargement, an appropriation 
of $15,000 having been granted by the Legislature for this purpose. A wing, 
sixty by thirty-one feet, one and one-half stories in height, with basement, has been 
added to the hospital, which will provide offices for physicians and dentist, with 
treatment rooms on the lower level, and additional rooms for girls and officers on 
the first and second floors. 

From an appropriation of $155,100 plus $3,330.54 brought forward from balance 
of 1928 a total of $155,714.72 was expended for maintenance of this institution. 
Of the amount expended, $69,269.88 was for salaries, wages and labor; all other 
expenses, $86,444.84. Weekly per capita cost of maintenance, computed on ex- 
pense less sales and refunds from maintenance, $9,653. Total receipts from all 
sources other than the State treasury, $822.15. Net cost of maintenance to the 
Commonwealth, $179,511.02. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed 
to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3.9. The Trustees estimate that $162,570 
will be necessary for maintenance in 1930. 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS. 

In the matter of financial supervision, the Department examines and analyzes 
institution expenditures, keeping constantly in mind the function of the institution 
and the relation of its business to the care, education, and welfare of the inmates. 
The following tables are designed to show in detail the financial condition of each 
institution. 

Capacity, Population and Inventory. f 

Table I gives in brief a statistical representation of the size and value of the 
five institutions under the supervision of the department. Part I deals with the 
number of persons served by the institutions. Part II deals with the value of 
the property. 



44 

Table I. — Part I. 



P.D. 17. 

— Capacities and Population of the Five Institutions for the 
Fiscal Year ending November 80, 1929. 



INSTITUTIONS 


Normal 
Capacity 


Peesent Any 
One Time 


Daily Average Number 
Present dtjrino thf Year 


Largest Smallest 
Number Number 


1929 1928 1927 


State Infirmary 

Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 


2,800 

M, 316 

480 

290 

•' 263 


2,816 2,375 
325 159 
565 483 
314 280 
327 292 


2,567.16 2,574.00 2,442.00 
283.30 271.20 271.60 
522.97 499.14 486.19 
295.00 297.00 287.00 
307.95 304.00 297.08 


Totals .... 


4,149 


4,347 3,589 


3,976.38 3,945.34 3,783.87 



Table I. — Part II. — 


Inventory 


of the Five Institutions 


November 80, 1929. 






Real and Personal E 


STATE 




INSTITUTIONS 


LAND 


Buildings 


Personal 
Property 


Total 




Acres 


Value 


Value 


State Infirmary 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 


794.00 

165.72 
533.00 
889.15 
329.00 


$79,939 94 
34,632 32 
50,303 67 
33,288 00 
17,305 00 


82,045,608 68 
607,147 56 
548,966 00 
523,145 15 
420,689 55 


$456,024 70 
111,547 91 
163,143 61 
138,814 56 
106,392 77 


$2,581,573 32 
753,327 79 
762,413 28 
695,247 71 
544,387 32 


Totals .... 


2,710.87 


$215,468 93 


$4,145,556 94 


$975,923 55 


$5,336,949 42 



Pt. I. 



45 



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Massachusetts H 
Lyman School fo 
Industrial School 
Industrial School 




"3 
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Pt. I. 47 

Table III. — Part II. — Expenditures of the Five Institutions for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 30, 1929 — Continued. 







For Special Pu 


RPOSES 




INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Furnish- 
ing and 
Equipping 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Total 


State Infirmary ..... 

Massachusetts Hospital School 

Lyman School for Boys .... 

Industrial School for Boys 

Industrial School for Girls 


— 


$75,409 58 

914 34 

21,008 31 

9,627 38 

23,796 30 


- 


$149 04 


$75,409 58 

914 34 

21,157 35 

9,627 38 

23,796 30 


Totals 


- 


$130,755 91 


- 


$149 04 


$130,904 95 



Table III. — Part III. — Summary of Expenditures for the Fiscal Year ending 
November 30, 1929 — Concluded. 

INSTITUTIONS 

State Infirmary 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 

Totals .... 









Specia 




Trust 






Maintenance 


Purposes 


Funds 


Total 




$991,673 


58 


$75,409 


58 


- 


$1,067,083 


16 




192,013 


54 


914 


34 


- 


192,927 


88 




239,270 


95 


21,157 


35 


$279 88 


260,708 


18 




161,577 


94 


9,627 


38 


— 


171,205 


32 




155,714 


72 


23,796 


30 


- 


179,511 


02 




$1,740,250 


73 


$130,904 


95 


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$1,871,435 


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50 



P.D. 17. 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS. 



Under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 77, section 2, the five county 
training schools for truants and habitual school offenders are subject to the visita- 
tion of this Department, which is required to report thereon in its annual report. 
The names of the schools and of the Superintendents are as follows: 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence, W. Grant Fancher. 

Hampden County Training School, Springfield (Feeding Hills), Clifford M. Granger. 
Middlesex County Training School. North Chelmsford, Charles G. Hoyt. 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School, Walpole, James H. Craig. 
Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston), Alton W. Peirce. 

Table I shows the trend of population in the County Training Schools during 
the past 5 years. 

Table I. — County Training Schools — Average number in Schools during the 

Years 1925-1929. 



Essex County Training School .... 

Hampden County Training School . . . . 

Middlesex County Training School . 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School 
Worcester County Training School .... 

Totals 



1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


98.5 


93.6 


96.9 


97.4 


81.40 


46.0 


42.0 


46.0 


44.00 


49.00 


86.2 


94.2 


95.7 


89.13 


94.74 


29.6 


26.0 


28.0 


30.91 


29.00 


40.3 


42.6 


38.2 


34.24 


38.46 



300.6 



298.4 



304 .8 295 . 68 292 . 60 



Table II shows the numbers and the movement of the population in these insti- 
tutions for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1929, and also the average weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, SI 2.09, subtracting all receipts from private sources. 

As will be seen from Table II there were 484 children in the five schools during 
1929. The year opened with 284. In the succeeding twelve months 200 were 
admitted and 183 were discharged, leaving 301. 

The average age of the children at the time of their admittance was thirteen 
years, six months, twenty-one days. Every child must be discharged, by require- 
ments of the statute, upon reaching the age of sixteen. 



Table II. — County Training Schools — 


Number and Movement 


of Population. 






Number 


en School during the Year 




Main- 
tenance 
of Schools 
(Average 
Weekly 
per Capita 
Cost) 


School 


Whole 
Number 


Average 
Number 


On 

Jan. 1, 

1929 


Admitted 


Released 
or Dis- 
charged 


Remain- 
ing on 
Dec. 31, 
1929 


Essex County Training School . 
Hampden County Training School 
Middlesex County Training School 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth 

Union Training School . 
Worcester Training School 


124i 

69 

185 

52 

54 


81.4 

49. 

94.74 

29. 
38.46 


87 
45 

87 

27 
38 


37 
24 

98 

25 
16 


38 
22 

82 

26 
16 


86 
47 
103 

26 
38 


12.42 
12.14 
10.57 

16.10 
9.23 


Totals .... 


484 


292.60 


284 


200 


184 


300 


12.09 



1 Two are girls. 

LICENSING OF BOARDING HOMES FOR AGED PERSONS. 

(General Laws, Chapter 121, Section 22A. Inserted by Acts of 1929, Chapter 305. 1 ) 

Francis Bard well, Supervisor. 

Under the law to license boarding homes for aged persons, which went into effect 
May 10, 1929, the Department has received applications and followed up with 
investigation. From May 10, 1929, to November 30, 1929, 159 applications were 
received as listed below: 



Boston Proper, 3 

Greater Boston: 
Allston, 1 
Ashmont, 1 
Brighton, 3 
Dorchester, 9 
East Boston, 1 
Hyde Park, 1 



Jamaica Plain, 1 
Mattapan, 3 
Roxbury, 6 
West Roxbury, 4 

Abington, 1 
Arlington, 3 
Athol, 1 
Belmont, 2 



Berkley, 1 
Braintree, 2 
Brockton, 3 
Brookline, 8 
Cambridge, 7 
Cochituate, 1 
Cohasset, 1 
Dalton, 1 
Everett, 1 



Fairhaven, 2 
Fitchburg, 1 
Framingham, 3 
Grafton, 1 
Hanson, 1 
Haverhill, 3 
Hingham Center, 1 
Hopkinton, 1 
Holbrook, 1 



Pt. I. 51 

Lexington, 2 New Bedford, 2 Revere, 1 Westborough, 1 

Lowell, 4 Newburyport, 2 Rockport, 1 West Concord, 1 

Lynn, 6 Newton, 6 Somerville, 2 West Lynn, 1 

Maiden, 3 Newton Center, 2 Springfield, 4 Westdale, 1 

Marlborough, 1 Newtonville, 3 Stockbridge, 1 Westfield, 1 

Marblehead, 1 North Andover, 1 South Weymouth, 1 Whitman, 1 

Medford, 2 Northboro, 1 Sudbury, 1 Winchester, 1 

Melrose, 3 Peabody, 3 Swampscott, 3 Winthrop, 1 

Methuen, 1 Pittsfield, 1 Wakefield, 1 Wollaston, 1 

Milton, 1 Quincy, 1 Waltham, 4 

Natick, 1 Reading, 1 Watertown, 4 

The number of licenses granted during this period of time is 25, and the premises 
are located in the following cities and towns : 

Boston Proper, 1 Mattapan, 1 Brookline, 1 Newtonville, 1 

Roxbury, 1 Cambridge, 3 Revere, 1 

Greater Boston: West Roxbury, 2 Hingham Center, 1 Watertown, 3 

Brighton, 1 Newton, 1 Winchester, 1 

Dorchester, 1 Braintree, 2 

The number of investigations made during this period of time is 157. 

It is the policy of the Department to work with the local authorities, securing 
reports of the fitness of the premises as to the fire protection ordinances and com- 
pliance with the local zoning laws. References are required from all applicants 
and preferably from visiting physicians, or individuals who have had relatives as 
patients. 

The Department has insisted on applications from all boarding homes where 
three patients sixty years of age or over are in residence; this, in many cases, in 
spite of the fact that a majority of the patients may be under that age. 

The Department has established the policy that at least two exits must exist 
from all floors above the ground floor, and it seems there should be a policy pro- 
viding that no helpless patients be housed above the second story. 

There have been no contract cases allowed by the department, nor have any 
applications for this type of care been presented. 

It is evident that this new law will do away completely with this type of care. 

For those licenses already granted and applications received the prices for board 
and care begin at $8 and run to $75 a week. 

It is the intention of the Department to have lists of the licensed homes both 
as to location and prices charged. While the Department makes no guarantee as 
to these homes, this index should prove of value to individuals seeking homes for 
aged relatives or friends. 

SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUPPORTED 
BY CITIES AND TOWNS. 

The City and Town Poor. 

General Laws, chapter 117, sections 3, 36, 37 and 38, and chapter 121, section 
16, provide that the Department of Public Welfare may visit and inspect all 
places where city or town poor are supported in families, and require the Depart- 
ment to visit, at least once a year, not only all children who are maintained by the 
Commonwealth, but all minor children who are supported at the expense of any 
city or town. Children illegally retained in city or town infirmaries must be 
removed therefrom and placed at board at the expense of the city or town con- 
cerned. 

The Settled Adult Poor provided for in Families. 

Of the 262 adult persons reported by local authorities as fully supported in fami- 
lies on January 1, 1929, 22 had died and 29 had been removed before visits could 
be made. The remaining 211 — 113 men and 98 women — were all visited and 
reported on by the department's agents. They were supported by 107 cities and 
towns as follows: 

Abington, 5 Bolton, 1 Colrain, 3 Fairhaven, 2 

Acushnet, 4 Bourne, 3 Conway, 4 Fitchburg, 1 

Agawam, 1 Braintree, 2 Danvers, 10 Florida, 1 

Amherst, 3 Brewster, 1 Dartmouth, 1 Framingham, 3 

Arlington, 1 Brimfield, 1 Dennis, 1 Gardner, 1 

Attleboro, 2 Buckland, 2 Dighton, 2 Gay Head, 1 

Belchertown, 3 Charlemont, 2 Dracut, 1 Gill, 3 

Berlin, 1 Cheshire, 3 Edgartown, 4 Goshen, 1 

Bernardston, 1 Chicopee, 1 Enfield, 2 Great Barrington, 11 

Billerica, 1 Clarksburg, 1 Everett, 1 Halifax, 1 



52 P.D. 17. 

Hanover, 1 Merrimac, 3 Raynham, 3 Wellesley, 2 

Hardwick, 1 Middleborough, 6 Reading, 2 Wellfleet, 3 

Haverhill, 1 Millbury, 2 Rehoboth, 5 West Stockbridge, 2 

Hawley, 1 Millville, 3 Revere, 8 West Tisbury, 1 

Heath, 2 Needham, 5 Rowley, 1 Westford, 1 

Hingham, 1 New Marlborough, 2 Royalston, 3 Westport, 1 

Holbrook, 1 New Salem, 1 Russell, 1 Weymouth, 1 

Lakeville, 2 North Attleborough, 1 Rutland, 1 Whately, 1 

Lawrence, 1 Northborough, 3 Sheffield, 4 Whitman, 8 

Lee, 3 Norton, 4 Shrewsbury, 1 Wilbraham, 2 

Leyden, 1 Norwood, 4 Southwick, 1 Williamstown, 1 

Ludlow, 2 Oak Bluffs, 1 Stockbridge, 1 Winchester, 7 

Lunenburg, 2 Orange, 4 Stoughton, 1 Winthrop, 6 

Lynn, 2 Otis, 3 Topsfield, 4 Woburn, 5 

Maiden, 1 Pepperell, 1 Walpole, 6 Yarmouth, 2 

Marlborough, 5 Petersham, 1 Wareham, 1 

Medfield, 2 Pittsfield, 1 W^atertown, 4 

Melrose, 3 Quincy, 1 Webster, 1 

Their ages were as follows: five between 30 and 40; seven between 40 and 50; 
twent3 T -two between 50 and 60; thirty-three between 60 and 70; ninety-two be- 
tween 70 and 80; fortj^-seven between 80 and 90; four between 90 and 100; one 
between 100 and 110. 

For their support there was paid in three cases from $2 to S3 per week; in ten 
cases from S3 to S4 -per week; and in one hundred ninety-seven cases — mostly of 
old and feeble persons — the rate varied from S4 to $21 per week according to 
the amount of care required. In one case the person was self-supporting. 

Of the whole number, 97 were reported to be in good or fairly good physical 
condition and 188 in good or fairly good mental condition. In all but four cases 
they were apparently receiving good care, and these cases were brought to the at- 
tention of the members of the local board. There were 49 able to do light work 
either in the house or about the premises. In 170 cases, according to the reports, 
the members of the local boards of public welfare complied with the law requiring 
them to visit these persons at least once in every six months; in 14 cases they were 
visited once during the year; in 18 cases they were not visited at all; and in 9 
cases no record of visit could be found. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for in 

Infirmaries. 
Visits were made to 128 children — 57 boys and 71 girls — reported to be cared 
for by the following cities and towns in their infirmaries : 



Boston, So 
Charlton, 1 
Ea^t Bridgewater, 3 
Fall River, 11 



Gardner, 1 
Holyoke, 3 
Lowell, 3 
Medford, 2 



New Bedford, 2 
Northampton, 2 
Oxford, 3 
Springfield, 6 



Taunton, 2 
Westford, 1 
Worcester, 3 



In addition to this number 84 had been removed from the infirmaries before the 
time of visitation. Of the number visited, 88 were so defective in either mind or 
body as to make their retention in an infirmary desirable. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for Outside 

Infirmaries. 
As shown by the department's visitation of the 1,265 children reported by the 
authorities as fully supported outside the infirmaries on January 1, 1929, and July 
1, 1929, 250 had been removed before visits could be made, 3 had died, and 24 
were supporting themselves. The remaining 988 — 531 boys and 457 girls — 
were supported by the 91 cities and towns as follows: 



Abington, 3 
Acton, 1 
Adams, 3 
Agawam, 1 
Andover, 5 
Arlington, 4 
Athol, 1 
Attleboro, 8 
Barre, 2 
Belmont, 1 
Bernardston, 
Beverly, 10 
Billerica, 2 
Boston, 700 
Braintree, 7 
Brockton, 17 
Brookline, 2 



Buckland, 1 
Cambridge, 13 
Chelsea, 2 
Chicopee, 6 t 
Colrain, 2 
Concord, 3 Jj 
Dalton, 1 g 
Danvers, 3 
Dartmouth, 1 
Deerfield, 2 
Dracut, 3 
Dudley, 1 
Easthampton, : 
Enfield, 1 
Erving, 3 
Everett, 3 
Fairhaven, 2 



Fitchburg, 14 
Framingham, 1 
Georgetown, 1 
Gloucester, 1 
Grafton, 1 
Greenfield, 1 
Hopkinton, 2 
Lawrence, 20 
Lee, 1 
Lincoln, 3 
Lynn, 37 
Maiden, 1 
Marblehead, 4 
Maynard, 1 
Medford, 3 
Merrimac, 2 
Middleborough, 5 



Milford, 3 
Millbury, 1 
Milton, 1 
Montague, 4 
Natick, 6 
Needham, 2 
New Bedford, 97 
Newburyport, 4 
Newton, 1 
North Andover, 4 
North Brookfield, 2 
North Reading, 1 
Norton, 1 
Norwood, 6 
Palmer, 4 
Petersham, 1 
Quincy, 11 



Pt. I. 53 



Rochester, 10 


Saugus, 1 


Wareham, 3 


Westfield, 3 


Rockland, 9 


Somerville, 7 


Water town, 7 


Whitman, 2 


Royal-ton, 5 


Southbridge, 14 


Wellesley, 1 


Williamsburg, 3 


Russell, 2 


Springfikld, 9 


Wellfleet, 2 


Winchendon, 2 


S ilem, 26 


Stockbridge, 1 


West Sprirgfleld, 1 


Worcester, 79 


S Jisbury, 2 


Taunton, 8 


Westborcugh, 2 


Total, 988 



Of the whole number 23 were cared for and treated in hospitals and institutions. 
There were 752 who attended school, and 145 who did more or less work about the 
house. Of the whole number, 953 were in good or fairly good physical condition, 
and 941 in good or fairly good mental condition. The price of board varies from 
$1.75 to $7 per week. These children were found to be well cared for with a few 
exceptions, which have been brought to the attention of the local boards of public 
welfare. 

The Penalty incurred by certain Cities and Towns for Failure to make 
their returns of poor relief during the month of april, 1929. 

Under sections 32 to 35 of chapter 117 of the General Laws, the department re- 
ported to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth the names of the cities and towns 
which failed to make their returns of poor relief during the month of April, 1929, 
together with the amount of penalty incurred in each instance as follows: Auburn, 
$160; Barre, $14; Belchertown, $5; Buckland, $15; Dana, $341; Dartmouth, $8; 
Egremont, $10; Erving, $7; Freetown, $19; Gay Head, $15; Granville, $9; 
Hanover, $1; Hopkinton, $9; Lee, $21; Longmeadow, $6; Lowell, $35; Lynn- 
field, $23; Montgomery, $9; Nahant,$2; New Braintree, $15; Palmer, $2; Prince- 
ton, $192; Rowley, $6; Rutland, $1; Salisbury, $1; Sandisfield, $15; Sandwich, 
$6; Shrewsbury, $7; Sutton, $1; Swansea, $3; Topsfield, $1; Tyngsborough, $6; 
Uxbridge, $19; Williamsburg, $8; Wilmington, $20. 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

The Commissioner of Public Welfare made four recommendations for legislation 
for 1930. These recommendations were forwarded to the Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth on December 4, 1929, in accordance with the provisions of section 33 
of chapter 30 of the General Laws, as amended by section 43 of chapter 362 of 
the Acts of 1923. The recommendations were as follows: 

1. To Repeal the Wife-Settlement Law. 

I recommend the repeal of the wife-settlement law, so called, section 12 of 
chapter 122 of the General Laws. The wife-settlement law is one of several pro- 
visions under which the State gives aid in the home. Historically it was one of 
the first of such provisions, but the general substitution of adequate aid at home 
instead of almshouse care in this State have made the old law no longer necessary. 
Last year the number of cases receiving aid under the wife-settlement law was 
587, and $13,116.90 was given in aid under it. The same aid could better be given 
under the temporary aid law, section 18 of chapter 117 of the General Laws. No 
different result would be reached; the State would continue to approve the same 
claims of cities and towns and for the same amounts, but the process would be 
simpler. This complicated statute and this particular form of notice would be 
eliminated. 

The wife-settlement law was enacted in 1855, at a time when the method of re- 
lieving poverty by the State was to send poor persons to the state almshouses, if 
they had not acquired by length of residence or otherwise a legal settlement in a 
city or town. The wife-settlement law, to prevent the breaking up of families, 
provided that if a man who had no legal settlement was in need, and his wife, 
also in need, had a legal settlement in a city or town, he could be aided by the town 
of her settlement and need not be sent to a state almshouse. Today the situation 
has entirely changed. The state almshouses have been abolished. Poor persons 
are no longer sent to state institutions for reasons of poverty alone, but are given 
cash aid under the other provisions of law and are aided at home. The need for a 
separate law to cover husbands in cases where the wife has a legal settlement has 
ceased to exist. 

2. To Provide for Annual Reports of Charitable Trusts. 
Such charitable trusts as are incorporated are required to make an annual finan- 
cial report to the Department under the provisions of section 12 of chapter 180 of 
the General Laws. Certain charitable trusts, when the funds are given or be- 



54 P.D. 17. 

queathed to a town, must make an annual report to the town. There is just as 
great a need for an annual public report of every charitable trust, whether incor- 
porated or not. Such trusts as are incorporated secure a large degree of protection 
from the annual report which is made to this Department. The public looks to 
this Department for protection against the improper solicitation of funds and the 
improper use of charitable funds. If the trust happens to be one which is not 
incorporated and is not concerned with funds which are given to a town, no pub- 
lic report is made and the public departments exercise no regular supervision. I 
recommend that all charitable trusts be required to make a report similar to the 
one now required of charitable corporations. 

3. For the Regulation op Foreign Charitable Corporations. 

Foreign charitable corporations may now engage in activities in Massachusetts 
without being subject to the provisions of law which govern domestic charitable 
corporations. The public needs as much protection in regard to foreign charitable 
corporations as it does in regard to domestic charitable corporations. The laws 
should, in our opinion, be amended to require a foreign charitable corporation to 
file with this Department a copy of its charter authority and to make the annual 
report which is required of a domestic charitable corporation by chapter 180, 
section 12, of the General Laws. 

4. To Prevent the Double Payment to School Committees for Trans- 
portation of Children under the Care of the Division of Child Guard- 
ianship. 

When section 7 of chapter 76 of the General Laws was last amended in 1921, 
chapter 272, the rate of tuition in the public schools for children placed by the 
State or by the city of Boston was changed from 75 cents per week to a rate based 
upon the "expenditure per pupil for support exclusive of general control." This 
expenditure per pupil for support includes the cost of transportation. Another 
section of the same chapter 76, section 8, provides that the State and the city of 
Boston shall also pay for transportation in addition to tuition. Inasmuch as the 
transportation charge is now included, as above stated, in the rate for tuition, it 
is an injustice for the State and the city of Boston to have to pay separately for 
transportation. It is a double payment for the same item of expense. I recom- 
mend that section 8, relating to transportation, be repealed. 

Licensing of Boarding Holies for Aged Persons. 

A bill to license boarding homes for aged persons was recommended by the 
Commissioner personally in January, 1929, for the reasons given below, and it 
was enacted on May 10, 1929. 

"A tragedy which happened to twenty elderly people who were left stranded 
in the Cooper Homestead in December shows the necessity for this legislation. 
Homes of this sort may now operate with no state regulation. They may and do 
take all the money that aged people can get together as an admission fee, promising 
life care, and then they may use it, as Mrs. Cooper did, and go into bankruptcy, 
leaving the old people destitute and facing the poorhouse. 

"The bill imposes upon the Department of Public Welfare the duty of licensing, 
visiting and inspecting every boarding home in which three or more old persons are 
cared for. State supervision would mean the thorough investigation of the finan- 
cial soundness of each boarding home and the character of its management, an 
annual financial report, frequent inspections, a report whenever any one is admitted 
for life care, and insistence upon a reasonable security for life contracts. 

"The bill provides that no such life contract or contract for more than five 
years can be entered into without depositing security with the State Treasurer. 

"The essential difficulty with the situation about these unincorporated and un- 
supervised homes is that the old people are making their contracts with an indi- 
vidual who is operating a private business and not with an incorporated home for 
the aged. An incorporated home for the aged can carry out its agreement to 
care for people for life, because it has an endowment, it has an annual subscription 
list, it has a responsible Board jf Directors, and it has supervision. The proposed 
bill exempts from its provisions incorporated Homes for the Aged, because these 
incorporated homes are already under the supervision of the Department of Pub- 
lic Welfare." 



Pt. I. 55 

LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT PASSED BY THE 
LEGISLATURE OF 1929. 

Chapter 146. — An Act making Appropriations. 
Item 522a. Appropriation for an investigation and survey to ascertain the 
number of crippled children in the community who are not receiving the benefit of 
treatment at the Massachusetts Hospital School, at a cost not to exceed ten thou- 
sand dollars, of which amount five thousand dollars is hereby appropriated in an- 
ticipation of a further sum to be appropriated in nineteen hundred and thirty. 
$5,000.00 

Chapter 221. — An Act relative to Consent and Notice upon Petitions 
for Adoption of Children. 

Section 1. Chapter two hundred and ten of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by striking out section two and inserting in place thereof the following: — 
Section 2. A decree for such adoption shall not be made, except as hereinafter 
provided, without the written consent of the child, if above the age of fourteen; 
of her husband, if she is a married woman; of the lawful parents or surviving 
parent; of the mother only of the child, if illegitimate; or of the person substi- 
tuted for any of the above named by this chapter. Illegitimacy shall in no case 
be expressly averred upon the record. A person whose consent is hereby required 
shall not thereby be debarred from being the adopting parent. If the child has 
been previously adopted, a subsequent decree of adoption of the child shall not 
be made without the written consent of the previous adopting parents or parent 
surviving, nor unless notice of the subsequent petition for adoption has been given 
to the persons whose consent to the original adoption was required under this 
section; but such subsequent decree may be made without the consent of such 
persons. Notice of any petition for adoption shall be given to the guardian of 
the child, if any. 

Section 2. Said chapter two hundred and ten is hereby further amended by 
striking out section four and inserting in place thereof the following: — Section If.. 
If the written consent required by the two preceding sections is not submitted to 
the court with the petition, the court shall order notice by personal service upon 
the parties of an order of notice, in such form as shall be prescribed under section 
thirty of chapter two hundred and fifteen, or, if the parties are not found within 
this commonwealth, by publication of said order of notice once in each of three 
successive weeks in such newspaper as the court orders, the last publication to 
be seven days at least before the time appointed for the hearing, and the court 
may require additional notice and consent. But if such child is of unknown par- 
entage and is a foundling, publication as herein set forth shall not be required; 
but notice of the petition shall be given to the department of public welfare. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect on September first in the current year. 
[Approved April 15, 1929] 

Chapter 305. — An Act relative to Boarding Homes for Aged Persons 
and to the licensing and supervision of the same by the department 
of Public Welfare. 

Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, 
therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate 
preservation of the public convenience. 

Chapter one hundred and twenty-one of the General Laws is hereby amended 
by inserting after section twenty-two, under the title "Boarding Homes for 
Aged Persons," the following new section: — Section 22A. The department 
may license any suitable person to maintain a boarding home for aged persons, 
may prescribe the conditions under which such a license may be granted and may 
make, and from time to time alter and amend, rules and regulations for the govern- 
ment of such homes. Every license issued under authority of this section shall 
be for the term of two years, but may be revoked by the department at any time 
for cause. The department shall have supervision of all such homes and may 
visit and inspect the same at any time and examine their accounts. Any person, 
other than a charitable corporation hereinafter referred to, proposing to enter into 
a contract to provide care incident to advanced age, for life or for more than five 



56 P.D. 17. 

years, for any person over sixty years of age and not a member of his immediate 
family shall report that fact immediately to the department and shall, before en- 
tering into or receiving any consideration under such contract, deposit with the 
state treasurer a bond in a sum and in an amount satisfactory to the department, 
with sureties approved by the state treasurer, or, in lieu thereof, such amount of 
money or securities as the department determines, as security for the proper care 
as aforesaid of such person. Any person who maintains a boarding home for 
aged persons without holding a license hereunder, and any person licensed here- 
under who violates any provision hereof, shall for a first offence be punished by a 
fine of not more than five hundred dollars and for each subsequent offence by 
imprisonment for not more than two years. Whoever, under his own name or 
under any other name or style, except a charitable corporation duly incorporated 
under the laws of this commonwealth, maintains a home in which three of more 
persons over the age of sixty years and not members of his immediate family are, 
for hire, gain or reward, by contract as aforesaid or otherwise, provided with care 
incident to advanced age shall be deemed to maintain a boarding home for aged 
persons for the purposes hereof. [Approved May 10, 1929] 

Chapter 12. — Resolve providing for an Investigation by a Special Un- 
paid Commission of the Laws relative to Dependent, Delinquent and 
Neglected Children and Other Children requiring Special Care. 
Resolved, That an unpaid special commission, consisting of the commissioner of 
public welfare, the commission of mental diseases and the deputy probation com- 
missioner and two other members to be appointed by the governor, is hereby es- 
tablished for the purpose of investigating the laws relative to dependent, delin- 
quent and neglected children and children otherwise requiring special care, and 
after completing said investigation, but not later than the first Wednesday in 
December in the current year, to report to the general court by filing with the clerk 
of the senate the results thereof, with its recommendations, if any, as to what 
changes it deems necessary in the procedure relative thereto, together with drafts 
of legislation necessary to carry such recommendations into effect. 

For the purpose of this resolve, said commission may expend out of such amounts 
as may be appropriated by the general court such sums as may be approved by 
the governor and council. [Approved April 2, 1929] 

PAST MEMBERS OF THE STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 

In this Department the service of unpaid Board members has always been of 
great value. It is the custom to record this service in the annual report. 



Date of Original 
Appointment 



June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

January 

June 8, 

June 8, 

November 5, 

January 22, 

April 18, 

November 23, 

December 8, 

February 14, 

May 31, 



July 

March 

June 

July 

April 

April 

December 22, 

December 22, 

January 25, 

December 4, 

December 24, 

December 24, 



1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1880 
1880 
1880 
1880 
1881 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1883 
1883 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1885 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1889 



Name 

Moses Kimball 
Nathan Allen, M.D. 
Henry I. Bowditch, M.D 
Charles F. Donnelly 
Edward Hitchcock, M.D 
Albert Wood, M.D. 
Robert T. Davis, M.D 
John C. Hoadley . 
Ezra Parmenter, M.D 
David L. Webster 
Charles F. Folsom, M.D 
Clara T. Leonard 
Thomas Talbot . 
Alfred Hosmer, M.D. 
George P. Carter . 
John Fallon 
Henry P. Walcott, M.D 
Albert A. Haggett 
Reuben Noble 
Edgar E. Dean, M.D 
Everett Torrey 
Charles A. Denny 
Samuel A. Green, M.D. 
Anne B. Richardson 
Henrietta G. Codman 
Richard L. Hodgdon, M 
Charles C. Coffin . 
D. Webster King . 
George W. Johnson 
Henry Stone 
Laban Pratt 



Residence 


Retired 


Boston . 


October 


27, 1880 


Lowell 


June 


7, 1880 


Boston 


January 


24, 1880 


Boston 


June 


7, 1907 


Amherst . 


June 


7, 1906 


Worcester 


June 


7, 1880 


Fall River 


January 


22, 1884 


Lawrence 


November 16 


Cambridge 


February 


1883 


Boston . 


April 


11, 1881 


Boston . 


January 


14, 1881 


Springfield 


March 


19, 1886 


Billerica . 


March 


12, 1884 


Watertown 


December 


4, 1882 


Cambridge 


June 


7, 1883 


Lawrence 


December 


15, 1889 


Cambridge 


June 


7, 1885 


Lowell 


October 


26, 1885 


Westfield 


June 


16, 1885 


Brockton 


December 


1, 1887 


Boston 


August 


16, 1886 


Leicester 


November 


4, 1889 


Boston . 


May 


15, 1889 


Lowell 


January 


26, 1899 


Brookline 


May 


16, 1906 


Arlington 


January 


30, 1893 


Boston . 


December 


17, 1889 


Boston 


August 


5, 1889 


Brookfield 


September 


1, 1903 


Boston 


January 


1, 1894 


Boston . 


June 


7, 1909 



Pt. I. 



57 



January 1, 


1890 


Ziba C. Keith 


Brockton 


June 11, 1891 


June 11, 


1891 


Charles J. Curran, M.D. 


North Adams . 


June * 7, 1896 


June 22, 


1893 


Richard M. Hodges, M.D. 


Boston 


January 1, 1895 


February 15, 


1894 


Leontine Lincoln . 


Fall River 


November 30, 1919 


February 14, 


1895 


John L. Hildreth, M.D. 


Cambridge 


July 2, 1898 


June 4, 


1896 


Edward H. Haskell 


Newton . 


November 2, 1897 


November 16, 


1897 


Jabez Fox .... 


Cambridge 


September 5, 1900 


June 22, 


1898 


Henry S. Nourse . 


Lancaster 


November 14, 1903 


July 7, 


1898 


James M. Pullman, D.D. 


Lynn 


November 22, 1903 


February 23, 


1899 


Annette P. Rogers 


Boston . 


December 15, 1899 


December 13, 


1899 


Frances Greely Curtis . 


Boston 


September 3, 1915 


August 7, 


1903 


Joseph Walker 


Brookline 


January 16, 1904 


December 9, 


1903 


Charles H. Adams 


Melrose . 


November 30, 1919 


December 9, 


1903 


David F. Tilley . 


Boston . 


August 17, 1919 


January 14, 


1904 


Charles R. Johnson 


Worcester 


November 30, 1915 


June 6, 


1906 


A. C. Ratshesky . 


Boston . 


— — 


June 20, 


1906 


Jeffrey R. Brack ett 


Boston . 


— — 


June 12, 


1907 


Thomas Downey . 


Boston . 


June 27, 1917 


June 16, 


1909 


Ada Eliot Sheffield 


Cambridge 


December 31, 1914 


December 30, 


1914 


Mary A. Barr 


Boston 


November 30, 1919 


August 11, 


1915 


Robert M. Merrick, M.D. 


Boston 


November 30, 1919 


August 11, 


1915 


Charlotte J. Guild 


Boston 


August 1, 1916 


November 29, 


1916 


Katherine H. Leonard . 


Springfield 


November 30, 1919 


June 20, 


1917 


B. Preston Clark . 


Cohasset 


November 30, 1919 



58 



P.D. 17. 



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62 P.D. 17. 

Part II. 
PRIVATE CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Richard K. Conant, Commissioner. 
Supervisors. 
Miss Caroline J. Cook, Chief. 
Miss Florence G. Dickson. 
Miss Alice M. McIntire. 

Government supervision of private charitable corporations is provided in three 
legislative enactments, the first of which requires the Department of Public Wel- 
fare to investigate all applications for charitable charters, while the second and third 
call for annual inspection and annual reporting. In the following pages of this 
part of the report the functions of the Department and the year's work under 
these several statutes are explained. This statement is followed by a tabulation 
of some of the essential figures showing the financial condition and the number of 
parsons aided by the various charities. 

Investigation of Charitable Organizations Seeking Incorporation. 

During the year ending November 30, 1929, 57 applications for charters have been 
referred to this Department by the Secretary of the Commonwealth for investi- 
gation under General Laws, chapter 180, section 6. In 4 cases the applications were 
withdrawn from this department before the hearing. Four (4) cases are pending 
action of this department at end of the year. This department has investigated, 
given hearings and reported on 55 applications, including 6 received prior to the 
beginning of the year. 

Fifty-five (55) applications as listed below, have been acted upon by the Secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth. 

Adams Lodge, No. 1335, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Alumnae Association of Simmons College 

Association of Baptists for Evangelism in the Orient, Inc. 

Belmont Masonic Association 

Brockton Post No. 35, The American Legion, Department of Massachusetts, 

Inc. 
Cambridge Community Center, Inc. 
Camp Chebacco, Inc. 
Camp Rotary, Inc., of Lynn, Mass. 
Chelsea Post No. 34, Inc., American Legion 
Chevra Thilim & Gemilath Chesed Association, Inc. of Chelsea 
Clara C. Hyams Fund, Inc. 
Commonwealth Benevolent Association 
Community Club of East Natick, Inc. 
Concord Nursery School 
Crosscup-Pishon Post, Inc. American Legion 
Disabled Ex-Service Men's Exchange, Inc. 

District Nursing Association of Barnstable, Yarmouth and Dennis, The 
Easthampton Home for Aged Women 
East Natick Improvement Association 
Everett Square and Compass Club, Inc. 
Gesang Verein Eintracht, Inc. 
Greek Women's Aid Society of Lynn, Mass. 
Hamblin L. Hovey Institute, Inc. 
Haverhill Hebrew Sheltering Home, Inc. 
Hebrew Free Loan Society, Inc., of Worcester 
Hudson Community Health Association, Incorporated 
James A. Roche Club 
Jewish Big Brother Association of Boston 
John A. Boyd Camp Building Association. Inc. 
Jonas Willis Parmenter Rest Home, Inc. 
Junior League of Fall River, Inc. 



Pt. I. 63 

Kappa Gamma Psi Fraternity of America, Inc. 

Kuo Min Tang Association 

Ladies Hebrew Free Loan Society 

Lincoln Aid Association 

Lincoln Social and Fraternal Club of Brockton, Mass., Inc. 

Lowell Association for the Blind, Inc. 

Lowell Greek Charitable Association, Inc., The 

Lynn Association for the Blind, Inc. 

Master Fishermen's Charitable Association 

National Braille Press, Inc. 

New England Deaconess Hospital 

Northampton Visiting Nursing Association 

Pan Cretan Society Minos Inc. 

Polish Community House Association, Inc. 

Polish Liberty Club, Inc. 

Rockland Post 147, American Legion Building Association, Inc. 

Solomon M. Hyams Fund, Inc. 

South Warren Community, Incorporated, The 

Tajak Sanctorum No. 151, Ancient Mystic Order of Samaritans, Inc. 

Walker Missionary Homes, Inc. 

Webster District Hospital 

West Springfield Veterans of Foreign Wars Home Association 

William J. Gould Associates, Inc., The 

Women's Palestine Agricultural Association Inc. (The Palagrass) 

Fifty- three (53) of these applications have been acted upon and charters issued. 
Charters have been withheld from the following : 

Kuo Min Tang Association 

Polish Community House Association, Inc. 

Inspection of Charitable Corporations. 

General Laws, chapter 121,. section 7, requires the Department of Public Wel- 
fare, upon the request or with the consent of a charitable corporation, to make 
annual inspection or investigation of such corporation. 

Three hundred and eight (308) inspections have been made during the past year, 
involving numerous conferences with directors and many visits to institutions. 

There have been 523 inquiries in regard to particular charities and general mat- 
ters connected with the field of private charity. 

Number and Classification of Incorporated Charities in Massachusetts. 

Of the 1,145 charitable corporations which made returns to this department 
during 1929, 121 are homes for the aged; 133 are child-helping agencies; 250 are 
hospitals or other institutions for aiding the sick; 124 are agencies giving family 
aid; and 169 are organizations doing community, neighborhood or club work. 
The remaining 348 corporations form a miscellaneous group chiefly civic or ele- 
mosynary in their nature. 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations. 

General Laws, chapter 180, section 12, provides that every charitable corporation 
must make to this department an annual financial return on or before the first 
day of November in each year, and further provides that if any corporation fails 
for two successive years to make the report, the Supreme Court may decree its 
dissolution. Figures from the financial reports of corporations for the last year 
are given on the following pages. The abstracts are arranged by towns in alpha- 
betical order under each town. 

An analysis of the returns made in 1929 shows the total property, real and per- 
sonal, of all these charities to be $287,348,069.45. Incumbrances on real estate 
came to but $10,067,293.32. Subscriptions and donations brought in $16,915,- 
826.77. Earnings and refunds, including receipts from beneficiaries, amounted to 
$23,344,658.91. Interest, dividends, annuities and rentals brought in $9,023,121.57. 
Legacies were received to the amount of $9,955,443.81; of this sum $4,877,874.90 
was unrestricted. The current receipts were $52,162,287.95. The current ex- 



64 P.D. 17. 

penditures were $49,138,283.07 of which $16,186,683.90 was paid for salaries and 
wages. The agencies reported 20,259 paid employees. 

Endorsement of Private Charitable Organizations. 

The Department of Public Welfare endorses no private charitable organization 
or agency. This rule is absolute, regardless of the known standing of any such 
society. Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this volume do 
not mean approval; on the contrary, inspection may mean the discovery of con- 
ditions calling for condemnation. No agency is warranted, therefore, in using the 
fact of inspection in such manner as to lead the public to believe that the depart- 
ment has approved or in any sense commends its work. 



66 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 


Abincton 
Abington Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. • . 


$940 46 




S571 15 


S658 69 


2 


Abington Y. M. C. A 


20,364 20 


S3, 000 00 


2,565 02 


1,826 60 


3 


County Committee of Young Men's Christian 
Associations of Plymouth County, Massa- 
chusetts, Incorporated, The 


218 40 


_ 


2,091 75 


311 75 


4 
5 


Adams 
Polish Roman Catholic Society of St. Stanis- 

law Kostka of Adams, Mass. l . 
Sisters of Providence (Greylock Rest) . 


125,136 96 


45,000 00 


4,180 49 


36,471 75 


6 

7 
8 


Amesbury 
Amesbury and Salisbury Home for AgedWomen 
Amesbury Hospital Association, The l . 
Ladies' Charitable Society of Amesbury 


76,555 11 
11,411 28 


- 


470 80 
86 87 


3,803 20 


9 

10 
11 


Amherst 
Amherst Boys' Club ..... 
Amherst Home for Aged Women 
Wilbur H. H. Ward Educational Trust, In- 
corporated, The ..... 


17,110 40 
67,974 26 

118,539 83 


- 


1,474 94 
2,441 15 

50 00 


- 


12 
13 


Andover 
Andover Guild l . ..... 

Andover Home for Aged People . 

Arlington 


112,783 09 


- 


31 00 


400 00 


14 


Arlington Training School for Nurses, Inc., The 


67 51 


- 


- 


7,488 00 


15 

16 
17 


Arlington Visiting Nursing Association, Inc. 

The 

Order of St. Anne (St. John's House for Children) 
Symmes Arlington Hospital (80 beds) . 


1,408 12 
116,823 82 
222,776 37 


22,000 00 
42,000 00 


4,349 55 
8,435 66 


4,509 84 
11,819 60 
98,720 73 


18 


Athol 
Athol Memorial Hospital 1 ... 










19 


Athol Y. M. C. A 

Attleboro 


100,055 60 




9,118 60 


7 495 81 


20 


Attleboro Community Chest, Inc., The 


231 81 


- 


41,052 38 


- 


21 
22 
23 


Attleborough Hospital, The (125 beds) 
Attleboro League for Girls and Women, Inc. 
Attleboro Springs, Inc. .... 


745,660 29 
17,794 92 


7,000 00 


9,753 17 
2,898 05 


68,932 18 
512 00 


24 


Attleboro Y. M. C. A 


155,463 51 


- 


13,266 54 


11,454 00 


25 
26 
27 


Family Welfare Association of Attleboro 
Mass., Inc. ...... 

John Daggett-Frances A. Crandall Home for 
Aged Women ..... 

New England Deaconess Association (Attle- 
boro Springs) ..... 


2,209 44 

30,055 73 

300,000 00 


120,000 00 


8,484 26 
2,576 00 
1,989 92 


1,529 12 
38,890 32 


28 
29 


Auburn 
Auburn District Nursing Association, Inc., The 
Skogsblomman Society, Inc. l 


1,250 71 


- 


723 50 


933 39 


30 


Avon 
Lutheran Orphans' Home Board, Incorpor- 
ated, The i 


89,188 09 


12,268 82 


7,361 82 


2,639 50 


31 
32 


Ayer 
Community Memorial Hospital 8 (12 bed) 
Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women, 
Inc., The 


48,168 35 
19,626 15 


10,000 00 
5,000 00 


20,744 19 
1,117 20 


16,959 70 
6,812 23 


33 

34 

35 


Barnstable 

Cape Cod Hospital (38 beds) 

District Nursing Association of Barnstable, 

Yarmouth and Dennis, The 
Hyannis Normal Students' Permanent Loan 

Fund Company ..... 


196,463 44 

1,063 24 

12,641 18 


- 


82,574 55 
4,842 50 


45,324 27 
2,213 54 
1,480 00 


36 


Barre 
Stetson Home ...... 


363,792 19 


- 


25 00 


1,147 47 



- None. x No report. 

8 Report for 13 months. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations. 



67 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 
aided ex- 
clusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$1,000 00 



4,000 00 



4,500 00 



1,000 OO^ 
2,931 18 



$1,229 84 
5,117 12 

2,403 50 

40,653 30 

7,146 56 
593 21 



1,474 94 
4,770 78 

5,248 12 



),172 52 



7,488 00 

8,567 04 
20,602 44 
98,720 73 



17,357 41 



41,185 43 

82,187 74 
4,334 55 



25,903 16 

8,947 15 

8,831 97 

42,717 48 



89 



13,068 00 

17,203 75 
8,646 79 

128,625 70 
7,123 90 
1,595 68 

16,901 68 



$1,748 76 
7,970 54 

2,200 50 



33,299 04 

4,138 86 
510 00 



1,589 23 
3,988 80 



4,539 18 



5,375 97 



7,457 59 

9,499 88 
22,733 24 
99,941 66 



18,522 76 

41,176 73 

85,650 70 
4,364 13 

26,269 84 

8,100 77 

6,660 81 

70,257 65 

1,710 36 



10,474 61 

16,951 35 
8,423 40 

68,627 73 

6,948 98 

730 00 

19,394 42 



$627 94 
3,768 00 


1 
2 


{ 


207 

182 

457 


42 

} - ; 


26 

_ 


1,616 45 


1 


{ 


212 

741 


} - 


- 


5,398 36 


14 




1,120 


34 


- 


480 50 


2 




12 


10 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


18 


762 50 
1,543 01 


3 
3 




604 
5 


604 


_3 


- 


- 




29 


29 


" 


2,361 20 


2 




7 


6 


_3 


6,742 00 


/ l 6 

I 4 


I 


_8 


_! 


_3 


6,479 88 
3,264 70 
16,221 91 


4 
2 
19 




_8 

35 

2,266 


12 
119 




9,385 58 


{ V 


1 


- 


- 


~ 


116 00 


1 


{ 


92 
_3 


} " 8 


_3 


41,665 34 
2,954 00 


33 
5 


1,542 
393 


75 
48 




- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


13,015 09 


11 


{ 


212 

1,493 


} 483 


_8 


2,742 00 


2 




1,505 


1,505 


- 


3,495 00 


4 




10 


4 




19,674 19 


f 33 
I 23 


} 


710 


_8 




834 35 


1 




216 


22 


_8 


3,321 00 


7 




_« 


_» 


_S 


7,878 97 


10 




321 


- 




3,078 92 


5 




_» 


_8 




27,104 11 


24 




1,855 


3 




5,380 00 


4 




571 


60 




- 


- 




135 


_8 




7,448 56 


9 




30 


30 





4 Restricted to capitr 



6 Paid officers, 



6 Report for 9 months. 



Report for 8 months 



68 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of PrivaU 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Belmont 
Belmont Community Nursing Association 

Berlin 

Elizabeth Rector Harper Bungalow for Desti- 
tute Children, Incorporated 1 . 

Beverly 
Beverly Female Charitable Society 
Beverly Fuel Society ..... 
Beverly Hospital Corporation (100 beds) 
Beverly School for the Deaf 
Country Week Association .... 

Essex County Health Association, Inc. 

Fisher Charitable Society .... 

Old Ladies' Home Society .... 

Vatoussian Educational Society, Inc. * 

Y. M. C. A. of Beverly .... 

BlLLERICA 

Pine Community Association, The 

Boston 

Abraham Lincoln Post Veterans of the World 
War ...... 

Academy of Medicine, Inc. 

A. C. Ratshesky Charity Foundation . 

Adams Nervine Asylum (36 beds) 

Agoos Family Charity Fund 

All Souls' Lend a Hand Club, Inc. 

Alumni Mutual Fund of Boston University 
School of Theology, Inc., The . 

American Home Makers, Incorporated 
American Humane Educational Society 
American Invalid Aid Society of Boston 
American Unitarian Association . 



American Women' 
England, Inc. 1 



Overseas League of Ne 



Animal Rescue League of Boston 

Army and Navy Service Committee, Inc. 
Association for Independent Co-operative Liv 

ing, The .... 

Association for the Work of Mercy in the Dio 

cese of Massachusetts 
Association of Andranovites Saint Nicholas 

Inc. ...... 

Association of the Evangelical Lutheran 

Church for Works of Mercy 
Auxiliary Relief Branch of the Russian anc 

Polish Jewish Central Committee at Jeru 

salem ...... 



Baby Hygiene Association . 

Baikar Association, Inc. * . 

Beacon Hill Community Centre, Inc. . 

Belgian Netherland American Social and 

Benevolent Club, Inc. 
Beneficent Society of the New England Con 

servatory of Music 
Benoth Israel Sheltering Home » . 
Berkeley Infirmary, Inc., The 1 . 
Bethany Union for Young Women 
Beth El Free Loan Society of Dorchester, Inc. 
Bethesda Society ..... 
Beth Israel Hospital Association (185 beds) 
Board of Ministerial Aid .... 

Boston Baptist Bethel City Mission Society 
Boston Baptist Social Union 



£9,654 65 


4,451 03 

27,115 21 

686,116 45 

189,051 77 

271 46 


406 67 


66,581 63 


197,956 07 


207,995 46 


2,808 60 


21,059 02 


847,724 43 

1,031,948 33 

137,684 41 

14,105 91 


15,878 15 


91 28 


236,058 86 


548 35 


7,929,172 71 


1,025,398 58 


41,565 42 


46,400 53 


103,762 73 


93 24 


66,963 55 


383 55 


98,950 87 


8,562 16 


18,351 30 


67,829 13 

1,781 77 

150,008 94 

3,331,246 09 

85,985 83 


270,826 59 


1,372,476 77 



:48,300 00 



7,200 00 



14,000 00 
31,000 00 



700,000 00 

20,750 00 
65,000 00 



•1,515 32 



108 00 

5 00 

19,294 15 

3,198 25 

5,450 00 

200 00 



923 00 
12,528 50 

1,243 83 

4,944 06 

110 00 

1,569 68 
3,412 31 

715 00 
9,096 34 

23,338 65 

4,005 50 

85,938 44 

21,461 78 
16,002 59 

87 00 

14,544 00 

187 00 

3,434 54 

7,395 87 

366 66 
396 70 
494 00 



957 00 

287 00 

3,997 76 

471,306 46 

29,145 52 

48,013 98 



- None. 



1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



s Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



69 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 





Families 


Indi- 


aided 


viduals 


Exclu- 


aided 


sive of 


Free 


Indi- 




viduals 



$353 56 



305 20 

1,158 91 

17,420 79 

2,183 75 

2 03 

79 13 
3,865 20 
9,691 60 



!75 35 



2,581 65 

11,039 46 

46,906 29 

7,647 10 

606 79 

814 30 
37 32 

10,302 05 



40,945 59 
108 77 

51 20 
1,155 04 

13 97 
1,366 46 

5,467 68 

12,945 26 

87 19 

756 34 



2,318 00 

37 88 

9,878 85 

592 00 

4,561 92 

5,947 19 

25,131 07 



1100 00 
2,600 00^ 



400 00 
700 004 



165,400 00 



/ 30,000 004 
1 9,989 61 



180,228 484 
963,073 94 



192,748 71 



5,500 00' 



850 53 



1,000 00 

1,500 00 

11,829 84 4 

13,500 00' 

574 27 



$5,277 55 



513 20 

1,163 91 

152,670 82 

58,318 56 

5,506 03 

6,200 14 
3,865 20 
11,515 50 



27,243 61 



1.243 83 



7,525 71 

176,549 46 
75,840 55 
7,647 10 
4,019 10 

10.246 80 
10,968 38 

26,970 48 

4,005 50 

1,363,309 88 



272,345 48 
18,450 42 
17,185 44 
16,653 36 
200 97 
8,799 18 

7,395 87 
5,467 68 

13,380 98 

483 89 

2,325 34 



19,966 73 
12,363 13 
25,469 60 
727,970 92 
33,802 34 

55,447 12 
25,131 07 



$4,303 24 



404 49 

1,541 02 

159,612 72 

42,463 17 

5,306 41 

5,928 27 
3,688 72 
7,925 94 

30,261 46 
1,319 52 



7,183 71 

29,860 66 

72,954 33 

25 00 

3,688 95 

6,757 11 
14,887 89 

21,109 93 

3,743 75 

373,359 35 



98,925 25 
16,096 05 

15,973 40 

15,565 27 

604 14 

9,035 28 

7,582 88 

5,467 68 

12,892 58 

370 28 

1,485 00 

17,928 32 

12,148 00 

25,268 38 

1,316,724 96 

33,732 67 

48,352 24 
31,455 83 



$3,595 04 



130 00 

59,125 36 

23,577 16 

1,975 50 

3,128 12 

300 00 

3,352 37 

14,982 33 



1,020 08 



11,220 31 

13,396 00 

1,287 00 

42,861 80 

58,992 77 
7,338 50 

4,532 29 

6,385 00 

3,240 00 
3,454 68 

6,271 89 



5,813 18 



11,738 87 
318,158 50 



33,178 70 
17,408 33 



15 

1 

35 

35 



10 

238 



12 

474 



63 

2,902 

65 

200 

68 
36 
11 

15 2 
907 



179 



176 
522 



111 

32 

3,500 
3,2212 

246 

2202 

219 



92,013 6 
46,578 

139 

194 

12 

26 



57 

130 

132 

9,674 

126 

52 

_3 
312 

200 



13 


" 


_s 


5 


_8 


65 


125 


- 


200 


_3 


_3 


_3 


36 


39 


11 


- 


150 


- 


- 


120 


13 


- 




_3 


39 


- 


_ 


— 


- 


30 


Ill 




2,000 




_3 




246 


_8 


_s 




_s 


_S 


10,954 


221 


61 


8 


152 




16 




_3 


_s 


_S 


_3 


_s 


_S 


3 


1 


1 




130 


_s 


6 




1,604 

3 




_8 


-S 


_S 


167 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid offu 



Animals. 



70 










P.D. 17 






Abstracts of Report 


s of Privatel 






Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


1 

i 
Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


i 

2 


Boston — Con. 
Boston Branch Baron de Hirsch Fund 
Boston Branch of the Christian and Mission- 
ary Alliance, Inc. ..... 


$7,196 03 
70,723 61 


$17,500 00 


931,909 58 


$5,216 76 


3 


Boston Children's Aid Society 


845.322 23 


- 


46.577 36 


33,610 15 


4 


Boston Children's Friend Society 


383,887 53 


- 


25,508 92 


25,326 90 


5 
6 

7 

8 
9 
10 


Boston City Hospital (1,877 beds) 
Boston Dispensary (34 beds) . 
Boston Educational Association for Deaf 
Children ...... 

Boston Episcopal Charitable Society . 
Boston Fatherless and Widows' Society 
Boston Floating Hospital .... 


7,495,104 46 
917,275 88 

3,071 58 
181,664 46 
235,130 66 
646,996 67 


- 


2,529,330 56 
83,460 05 

356 00 

1,240 00 

431 00 

79,562 58 


314,467 55 

112,067 94 


11 


Boston Health League, Incorporated . 


5,022 69 


- 


9,017 00 


- I 


12 


Boston Helping Hand Association, Inc. l 










13 


Boston Home for Incurables, The 


1,573,145 35 


- 


5,872 62 


8,823 25 


14 


Boston Hungarian Rifke Benais Jerusalem, Inc 


90 02 


- 


44 00 


367 45 


15 


Boston Industrial Home .... 


91,319 00 


4,800 00 


8,530 75 


7,451 40 


16 


Boston Ladies' Bethel Society 


218 10 


- 


61 75 




17 


Boston Leather Trade Benevolent Society 6 . 


108,741 78 


_3 


4,465 00 


- 


18 


Boston Legal Aid Society .... 


62,579 67 


15,000 00 


26,083 47 


12,506 16 


19 
20 
21 
22 

23 
24 
25 


Boston Lying-in Hospital (100 beds) . 

Boston Marine Society .... 

Boston Music School Settlement . 

Boston National Elks 1924 Convention Asso- 
ciation i . 

Boston Nursery for Blind Babies 

Boston Pilots' Relief Society 

Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society, Mana- 
gers of . 


2,555,338 81 

372,105 02 

11,737 98 

530,852 48 
293,012 37 

628,032 94 


1,000 00 


24,043 96 
7,100 00 
7,708 19 

641 05 
3,515 00 

3,050 00 


159,298 96 ! 
7,592 40 

594 05 

10,011 79 


26 
27 


Boston Provident Association 
Boston Public School Teachers' Retirement 
Fund 


590,256 52 
1,189,332 59 


- 


39,379 97 


5,407 95 
77,067 67 


28 


Boston Relief Committee Incorporated 


- 


_ 


- 


487 93 


29 


Boston School of Occupational Therapy, Inc. 


18,894 35 


- 


3,085 52 


16,936 67 


30 


Boston Seamen's Friend Society (Incorporated) 


428,872 32 


- 


27,601 86 


4,733 50 


31 


Boston Section Council of Jewish Women 


1,862 69 


_3 


5,784 68 


773 41 j 


32 
33 


Boston Society for the Care of Girls 

Boston Society of Optometrists, Incorporated 


529,613 51 
1,180 46 


- 


17,110 29 
925 00 


5,304 01 


34 


Boston Tuberculosis Association . 


220,154 05 


7,500 00 


13,971 22 


32,016 89 


35 
36 
37 

38 


Boston United Moath Chitim Association 
Boston Urban League, Inc. 
Boston Veteran Journalists' Benevolent Asso- 
ciation, Inc. * . 
Boston Wesleyan Association 


585 24 

1,921 27 
478,759 15 


_ 


3,100 00 
10,743 79 

1,986 65 


72 00 i 
37,865 02 


39 


Boston Young Men's Christian Association . 


2,272,085 24 


60,190 00 


118,756 00 


1,192,847 43 


40 


Boston Young Men's Christian Union . 


1,932,770 53 


_ 


31,309 18 


30,310 93 


41 


Boston Young Women's Christian Association 


2,327,636 24 


454,000 00 


434,171 21 


166,352 98 


42 

43 
44 
45 
46 


Boston Zezmer Association, Inc. . 
Boys' Club of Boston Incorporated 
Brackett Charitable Trust, Incorporated 
Brigham Hospital ..... 
British Charitable Society 8 . . . 


650 32 

989,173 50 

3,982 19 

1,063 86 


: 


152 00 
46,201 03 


239 25 
6,699 22 


47 


Brooke House ...... 


181,820 92 


- 


- 


21,287 53 


48 


Burnap Free Home for Aged Women . 


326,005 83 


_ 


1,912 50 


- 


49 
50 
51 


Burrage Hospital Association 
Calvary Rescue Mission, Inc. 
Cape Cod Association .... 


254,197 46 

755 03 

25,283 81 


- 


2,428 91 


- 



- None. 1 No report. 2 Organizations aided. 

7 Reported under Children's Aid Association. 8 Report not due. 



a Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



71 



Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 





* 


Families 


Total 


Indi- 


aided 


Indi- 


viduals 


exclu- 


viduals 


aided 


sive of 


aided 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 



$10,000 00 
4,675 60 

13,000 00 

100,000 00 
34,815 64 



5,252 10 
20,350 22 



1,750 00 4 
47,214 79 



1,200 00 



12,250 00 
100 00 



27,655 64 4 



1,158 40 
3,244 10 



9,555 42 



2,000 00 
11,000 00 



300 004 



21,427 89 l 
27,877 544 
38,487 29 

55,936 964 
2,000 00 



1,000 004 
30,250 00 



$279 54 
38,743 65 
136,099 27 
81,141 77 

2,860,630 44 
211,260 24 

566 00 

9,108 87 

17,495 16 

44,246 61 

9,048 54 

113,642 56 

356 66 

19,335 22 

70 29 

11,987 14 

43,665 89 

217,113 55 
28,945 28 
15,363 20 



26,307 91 
21,536 05 

43,757 98 
76,652 54 

126,082 52 

487 93 

20,133 51 

50,645 91 

5,956 59 

62,544 01 
914 07 

62,694 74 
3,172 00 
10,743 79 

2,002 99 
85,567 41 

1,329,333 24 
152,462 31 

323,656 52 

391 25 

52,968 50 
194 49 
24 00 

20,502 93 

46,177 05 

1,591 01 
2,428 91 
1,287 49 



$7 50 
40,146 33 
141,638 53 

67.485 89 

2,580,640 36 
241,582 18 

509 81 

9,177 00 

15,338 56 

24.486 88 

4,866 96 



57,875 68 


591 97 


18,148 17 


411 06 


7,077 85 


41,830 99 


210,823 14 
28,681 15 
14,445 98 


25,160 02 
10,814 12 


26,655 02 


75,702 64 


48,487 06 


660 31 


24,132 84 


43,777 15 


5,826 86 


60,253 15 
839 75 


55,5S4 97 


3,172 00 
10,526 73 


81 72 
91,111 32 


1,328,998 31 


139,130 42 


295,282 09 


755 84 

108,071 83 

211 46 


22,646 52 


13,832 19 


2,989 00 
2,402 80 
1,231 50 



$6,026 60 



19,958 35 

1,343,687 09 

173,895 46 

509 81 



12,157 69 
2,986 65 



27,890 65 



6,111 54 



530 00 

30,938 92 

63,103 75 
3.200 0^ 

12,789 45 



11,137 
300 



12,487 
20,320 



796 00 



14,612 
24,680 



27,937 

85 

5,116 



87 



39,243 49 

268,218 58 

52,719 61 

159,801 53 

53,052 37 



9,837 89 

5,336 60 

1,200 00 
400 00 
100 00 



22 



1,351 
151 



36 



14 

16 

421 



70 



22 

20 



114,647 
25,771 



85 



147 
326 



56 

12 

52 

3,353 

12 

_3 

13 

82 

8.983 

8,331 

97 

380 



37 
16 

10,932 
925 

336 

102 
68 



12 
32 

730 
1,253 



24,468 

1212 

6,299 

12 

_3 

12 

11,210 



12 

318 
20 



2,700 
5 



119 

100,903 
7,300 

85 



278 



23 



966 



5,871 
78 

52 

29 

2,306 

336 
16 



730 



7,369 
2,756 



20 



2,700 
5 



4 Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



Report for 14 months. 



72 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 
and Gifts 
Restricted 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Boston — Con. 
Carney Hospital (210 beds) 
Carney Hospital Nurses' Alumnae, Inc. l 
Charming Home .... 

Charitable Burial Association 1 

Charitable Irish Society ... 

Charitable Surgical Appliance Shop 

Charity of Edward Hopkins, Trustees of 

Charles Irwin Travelli Fund, The 
Charlestown Poor's Fund, Trustees of . 
Charlotte Cushman Club of Boston, The 
Children's Aid Association (Unincorporated) 

Children's Hospital, The (225 beds) . 

Children's Mission to Children, The 

Chinese Mission of New England Auxiliary to 
the American Sunday School Union . 

Christopher Shop, Inc., The 1 

Church Home Society for the Care of Children 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church . 

Citizens' Committee on Conservation, Inc. 1 

City Missionary Society 

Columbus Day Nursery of South Boston 
Commonwealth Charitable Corporation 1 
Community Service of Boston, Inc. 
Conference of Baptist Ministers in Massachu 
setts ...... 

Congregation Adath Bnei Israel 1 
Consumers' League of Massachusetts . 

Consumptives' Home, Trustees of the . 

Cooperative Workrooms, Inc. 

Council for Greater Boston Camp Fire Girls 

Craigie Foundation, The 

Daly Industrial School 

Deaconess' Aid Society of New England 

Dean Foundation for Little Children, Inc. 

Denison House ..... 

Devens Benevolent Society 
Diocesan Board of Missions 

Directory, Inc., The (for Mothers' Milk) 

Disabled Veterans Hospital Service Inc. 
Dispensary for Women 

Dorchester House .... 

Durant Incorporated, The . 

East Boston Free Loan Association, Inc. 

Eastern Missionary Association x 

Eastern Star of Massachusetts Charitable 

Foundation, Inc. .... 
Edward Hatch Memorial, Inc. 1 . 
Elizabeth Peabody House Association . 

Ellen M. Gifford Sheltering Home Corporation 

Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc. 
Employees' Fund, Incorporated . 
Episcopal City Mission, The 

Evangelistic Association of New England 

Faith and Hope Association 

Family Welfare Society of Boston 

Farm and Trades School, The 

Fathers' and Mothers' Club 

Faulkner Hospital Corporation (75 beds) 



> 270,533 00 
309,186 17 

16,525 66 
51,936 57 

79,869 82 

4,904 88 

45,779 04 

61.919 33 
7,120 ,6 

3,491,856 92 
891,195 06 

1,248 39 

332,093 27 

422,940 10 
23,102 42 

894 43 

295,398 40 

3,662 15 

71,884 87 

12,377 68 

62.920 48 

41 13 

86,918 06 
11,036 06 
85,150 00 

51,143 05 

3,189 25 
307,443 65 

9,389 87 

8,788 83 
3,107 17 

21,975 13 

1,317,740 02 
5,511 39 



186,119 26 

160,322 70 

196,760 54 

51,716 22 
90,441 46 
781,631 25 

6,402 29 

13,623 66 

557,940 65 

725,115 02 

25,020 76 
970,586 45 



■114.700 00 



41,000 00 
40,000 00 



39.500 00 



8,000 00 



287,536 00 



73,875 80 

15,000 00 
26,800 00 



120,000 00 



■15,398 03 
865 00 

4,536 61 



50,400 00 

10,576 91 
211,779 74 

69,853 13 
23,303 26 

6,475 00 

35,675 87 

36,296 19 
3,784 59 

20,836 00 

1,894 54 

3,758 25 

29,483 76 
10,369 34 

310 00 

1,609 53 
1,111 21 

19,588 64 

1 00 

27,850 52 

4,519 96 

18,509 74 
107 58 

525 00 

758 67 



33,333 15 

30,547 42 
9,062 68 
16,056 32 

47,341 59 
18,468 86 

5,630 97 

216,817 80 

12,937 00 

1,290 14 
16,086 15 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



73 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Numbei 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$151 44 


$13,730 78 


$227,853 50 


$209,528 68 


$66,419 75 


98 


17,726 


501 


_ 


1 
2 
3 

4 


12,093 16 


37,898 37 


57,415 85 


22,855 45 


10,837 34 


11 


78 


23 


- 


34 84 


- 


6,134 35 


7,147 25 


1,325 00 


1- 


/ 10* 

1 :! 


} - ; 


_3 


5 


2,485 31 


- 


42,058 15 


35,775 32 


23,045 66 


14 


_a 


_3 


6 


4,933 27 


- 


4,933 27 


4,405 75 


200 00 


1' 


/ 2 2 

I 6 

2372 

205 

402 


} 6 


- 


7 


294 14 

1,476 39 

235 45 


- 


50,694 14 

1,476 39 

30,623 42 

211,779 74 


57,664 74 

1,551 96 

18,526 54 

207,655 26 


350 00 

3,006 19 

80,108 36 


6 
50 


76 


60 


8 
9 

10 
11 


82,372 43 


/ 22,877 53< 
1 123,557 02 
/ 22,000 00" 
I 40,406 76 


} 531,595 83 


438,579 99 


235,844 38 


276 


19,551 


6,439 


- 


12 


44,699 61 


J 118,651 39 


83,933 96 


25,705 61 


15 


619 


149 


357 


13 


7 89 


- 


6,482 89 


5,742 30 


2,207 92 


6 


- 


- 


- 


14 

15 


14,869 77 


/ 38,833 47' 
1 100 00 


} 70,198 07 


82,318 42 


28,770 43 


27 


/ 42 
I 259 


} 58 


_8 


16 
17 


19,318 38 


23,327 89 


89,918 96 


68,563 74 


35,446 35 


l 5 

1 38 


} 5,580 
151 


5,182 


450 


IS 


251 97 


- 


4,036 56 


3,045 10 


832 00 


4 


- 


38 


19 
20 
21 


33 39 


- 


20,869 39 


20,014 59 


14,134 45 


9 


_3 


_3 


_3 


15,525 76 


500 00 


17,920 30 


18,641 97 


700 00 


25 


- 


- 


- 


22 
23 
24 


49 85 


5,000 00 


4,139 80 


6,174 79 


4,185 50 


2 


- 


- 


- 


4,330 50 


- 


4,330 50 


2,500 00 


- 


- 


{ i" 


1 _3 


- 


25 


476 78 


- 


58,655 11 


57,932 33 


22,140 55 


11 


I 52 

1 241 

J 102 

I 3,000 


1 241 


- 


26 


3,329 71 


- 


43,218 01 


39,664 00 


8,786 79 


5 


J 250 


65 


27 


- 


- 


310 00 


275 00 


275 00 


15 

1 


42 

80 


80 
6 

_3 


25 


28 


1,360 53 
579 26 


500 00 


18,410 46 
1,820 80 


17,912 34 
2,353 34 


1,872 00 


9 


107 

20 


_3 


29 
30 
31 


- 


- 


20,612 01 


20,696 69 


13,804 28 


11 


\ 594 

22 
_3 


1 120 


175 


32 


154 70 
14,130 13 


2,500 00 


155 70 

44,505 65 


289 50 
42,281 81 


- 


- 


_3 


4 

_3 


33 
34 


216 09 


- 


28,794 43 


27,505 50 


8,219 55 


5 


/ 112 

I 353 

1,524 

895 


} 3? 


_S 


35 


345 45 
151 95 

887 23 


/ 2,000 004 
I 1,242 89 


18,855 19 
1,768 23 

} 2,655 12 


17,397 06 
2,363 33 

3,090 87 


1,162 68 

_3 

2,005 63 


1 
4 

5 


65 

448 


: 


36 
37 

38 


21 09 




2,903 24 
16,697 41 


34,086 69 
1,153 41 


2,275 00 

_3 


4 

16 


8,000 
185 


_s 


_3 


39 
40 
41 


1,953 72 


- 


36,242 62 


16,027 14 


-3 


5 


17 


17 


- 


42 
43 
44 


1,492 66 


- 


40,025 61 


40,990 73 


20,364 39 


28 


2,000 


200 


_ 


7,630 06 


- 


9,112 68 


8,841 24 


1,764 50 


2 


f 6 2 
I 1,033 7 
1,500 
31 

-3 


| 1,033 7 

275 
31 

_3 


_ 


45 


885 41 

5,513 70 

27,934.10 


34,500 00 


27,735 44 

5,513 70 

116,130 56 


30,338 73 

1,686 25 

78,468 79 


16,069 83 
41,131 14 


12 
71 


-S 
_3 


46 

47 
48 


3,982 27 


- 


22,472 78 


22,324 17 


6,356 67 


{ r 


} 


- 


- 


49 




- 


8,294 40 


8,153 97 


1,697 08 


5 


/ 32 

I 505 


f 85 


_3 


50 


29,268 64 


/ 2,319 44* 
\ 12,377 76 


J 262,639 09 


265,965 52 


101,506 31 


71 


_s 


_3 


3,292 


51 


44,795 95 


/ 1,500 00 ^ 
I 3,600 00 


J 75,557 40 


80,219 78 


23,577 90 


22 


122 


21 


_ 


52 


846 97 


- 


2,311 12 


2,191 21 


850 09 


{ J' 

46 


\ 100 
1,965 


100 


_s 


)3 


29,405 14 


36,326 89 4 


171,247 57 


152,609 05 


48,159 62 


110 


- 54 


4 Restricted 


to capital. 


5 Paid officers. 


7 Animal 


8, s No 


"eport du< 


i. 6 1 


teport for 


10 months 


. 



74 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 






Property 
reported 


brances on 
Real Estate 


and 
Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Federated Jewish Charities of Boston l . 










2 


First Spiritualist Ladies' Aid Society . 


$415 30 


- 


$244 44 


$59 03 


3 


Florence Crittenton League of Compassion . 


478,516 49 


- 


47,168 09 


6,907 61 


4 


Folk Handicrafts Guild .... 


4,600 00 


_3 


- 


12,381 08 


5 


Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children 


3,269,415 66 


- 


- 


41,285 26 


6 


Fragment Society, The .... 


58,147 42 


_3 


492 00 


- 


7 


Frances E. Willard Settlement 


318,162 88 


$40,000 00 


20,794 71 


86,185 91 


8 


Frances Merry Barnard Home, Inc. 


91,978 78 


- 


2,000 00 


- 


9 


Franklin Square House .... 


775,765 22 


56,500 00 


35,913 53 


348,328 47 


10 


Franklin Typographical Society . 


84,558 50 


_3 


605 00 


3,752 50 


11 


Frederick E. Weber Charities Corporation, The 


838,955 20 


- 


- 


668 50 


12 


Frederika Home, Inc. .... 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


13 


French Benevolent and Relief Association 


512 45 


_3 


- 


_ 


14 


French Women's Christian Association 


7,250 00 


1,511 18 


72 60 


3,201 60 


15 


General Alliance of Unitarian and Other Lib- 












eral Christian Women . 


215,865 73 


- 


39,599 56 


395 74 


16 


German Aid Society of Boston 


58,527 15 


- 


558 00 




17 


German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston 


28,439 75 


- 


2,001 07 


_ 


18 


German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston (Alten- 












heim Fund) . . 


138,419 35 


- 


697 00 


2,085 31 


19 


Girls' Friendly Society Home 


33,984 12 


- 


3,543 64 


4,286 83 


20 


Girls' Friendly Society in the Diocese of 












Massachusetts, Inc. .... 


92,408 12 


62,400 00 


9,696 49 


23,384 10 


21 


Good Will House Association 


5,577 61 


_ 


6,208 85 


_ 


22 


Good Will Industries of America, Inc. 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


23 


Grand Masters and Wardens of the Alpha 
Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 












Masons of Massachusetts 


28,103 65 


8,365 60 


82 88 


_ 


24 


Greater Boston Bikur Cholim Hospital 1 










25 


Greenwood Church Community House, Inc. 


71,364 41 


37,000 00 


11,021 08 


1,661 03 


26 


Guild of St. Appollonia, Inc. 


2,183 43 


- 


5,125 00 


3,730 20 


27 


Guild of St. Elizabeth, The 


12,427 97 


7,500 00 


1,435 00 


4,709 91 


23 


Hahnemann Hospital .... 


68,108 31 


- 


- 




29 


Hairenik Association ..... 


42,772 12 


- 


17,262 00 


54,190 73 


30 


Hale House Association .... 


125,077 38 


- 


8,996 78 


815 04 


31 


Harriet Tubman House, Inc. 


14,910 07 


- 


500 00 


3,025 25 


32 


Harry E. Burroughs Newsboys Foundation, 












Inc., The 


504,154 37 


187,500 00 


5,155 00 


1,185 29 


33 


Hebrew Free Loan Society, The . 


16,179 85 


- 


9,904 87 


238,837 55 


34 


Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, The * . 










35 


Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association of 












Roxbury ..... 


16,551 81 


_3 


1,742 57 


30,329 02 


36 


Hebrew Ladies' Moshev Zekainim Association 


545,513 64 


105,000 00 


116,710 87 


19,626 65 


37 


Hebrew Sheltering Home Association of Rox- 
bury 1 . . . 
Hebrew Women's Sewing Society 1 










38 










39 


Hecht Neighborhood House, Incorporated l . 










40 


Helping Hand Sisters Association of East 












Boston, Inc., The ..... 


525 91 


- 


609 65 


- 


41 


Helping Hand Society "Dania" x 










42 


Holy Trinity Catholic School and Society 


455 99 


- 


750 15 


4,823 90 


43 


Home for Aged Colored Women . 


277,302 86 


- 


2,458 60 


731 89 


44 


Home for Aged Couples .... 


2,070,838 47 


- 


459 00 


17,181 84 


45 


Home for Aged Men ..... 


1,236,517 96 


- 


575 00 


1,650 00 


46 


Home for Aged Women .... 


2,246,524 06 


- 


7,559 65 


4,330 16 


47 


Home for Destitute Catholic Children . 


748,026 94 


- 


18,330 10 


- 


48 


Home for Italian Children, Incorporated 


174,916 17 


40,000 00 


32,649 74 


2,463 86 


49 


Home for Jewish Children J 










50 


Home Makers Association of Massachusetts . 


465 37 


- 


1,259 55 


185 33 


51 


House of the Angel Guardian, Trustees of 


527,451 53 


39,000 00 


35,822 57 


81,221 19 


52 


House of the Good Samaritan (75 beds) 


893,518 68 


- 


18,153 33 


11,915 28 


53 


House of the Good Shepherd 


471,324 90 


- 


21,514 15 


87,920 31 


54 


Household Nursing Association, The . 


90,720 74 


43,000 00 


7,977 25 


19,264 67 


55 


Howard Benevolent Society 


587,267 91 


_3 


100 00 


- 


56 


Humane Society of the Commonwealth of 












Massachusetts ..... 


339,126 83 


~ 


- 


~ 



None, 



1 No report. 



? Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated, 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



75 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



£17 56 

10,788 26 

423 85 

91,691 42 

6,143 33 

3,013 42 

4,331 04 

12,843 93 

3,819 87 

24,768 48 

5 45 



9,939 72 

3,083 49 

1,627 07 

5,840 72 

858 05 

196 70 

147 82 



!,440 54 

225 00 

16 01 

47 45 

,497 31 

,311 07 



- 


11 55 


230 78 


221 80 
2,001 26 


13,804 74 


87,653 26 


49,959 65 


77,366 74 


27,073 60 
499 57 


4,403 96 

38,998 48 

501 31 


3,008 59 


31,657 02 


21,727 73 



$5,004 40 * 
24,099 48 



15,685 58 



1,000 00 4 



,000 00 * 



1,000 00 



100 00 



8,290 49 
24,000 00 4 
107,304 93 



135,353 324 

7,000 00 

46,622 04 



8,492 91 

17,201 18 
18,500 00 



$321 03 

88,628 44 

12,804 93 
132,991 18 

6,635 33 
126,781 21 

4,331 04 

361,320 03 

7,677 37 

25,436 98 

5 45 
3,274 20 

49,935 02 
3,641 49 
2,028 82 

8,657 78 
8,688 52 

33,277 29 
6,356 67 



2,523 42 

12,907 11 
8,885 21 
6,192 36 
3,497 31 
71,452 73 
17,122 89 
3,775 25 

6,351 84 
249,073 20 



32,293 39 
138,422 10 



609 65 

5,694 05 

25,285 72 

212,599 03 
65,114 07 

96,256 55 

92,163 54 
35,613 17 

1,444 88 

129,940 63 
69,067 09 
127,136 95 

48,750 51 
31,757 02 



21,727 73 



$320 09 

63,934 68 

35,616 83 

146,578 57 

4,745 89 

116,485 86 

59 30 

347,306 34 

8,234 22 

24,121 47 

25 00 

3.074 96 

45,959 16 
3,163 31 
1,037 58 

10,603 77 
8,384 18 

30,601 53 

6.075 27 



2,718 16 

1,583 26 

7,702 02 

6,124 97 

274 84 

75,801 69 

17,078 10 

6,008 99 

35,113 14 
244,589 10 



32,239 54 
111,463 81 



937 67 

5,257 18 
14,042 21 

70,519 67 
59,570 27 

82,943 73 

49,699 62 
15,536 27 

1,274 77 

87,045 94 

67,250 66 

129,112 64 

29,345 95 
30,733 47 

24,616 87 









1 


$32,778 76 
17,952 15 

_3 

55,914 43 




_3 

100 

74 

48 


i 


160,920 92 

75 00 

3,525 00 


i 
1 


15 

175 

36 

35 

1 


f 


936 00 




2 




7,683 34 

820 00 

90 00 




4 
1 

25 




2,723 00 
3,623 85 




5 
11 




7,065 17 
4,013 00 




5 
4 


i 


1,004 00 




1 




321 00 
2,886 25 
3,051 00 




3 
2 
4 




8,527 00 

8,293 46 

894 00 




15 
9 

_3 




17,369 96 
8,545 30 


{ 


14 

15 

4 


} 


853 82 
30,887 79 




2 
45 





5 00 

1,216 00 
3,930 40 

22,830 16 
20,326 60 

24,670 27 

14,975 35 
2,730 00 



8,390 52 
28,230 34 
23,513 16 

15,740 21 
1,892 00 

10,437 71 



2-> 
25 

1 
2-A 

2 
32 
15 

6 



24 



12 

122 
122 2 
1,181 

14,696 

778 

1,160 

7,107 
48 

62 

90 

1 
118 



307 

4 : 

4,327 

175 



10,000 
185 



247 



950 



67 

778 



48 



175 



42 



10,000 
106 

_3 

3 


_3 

62 

_3 
_3 


1,479 


- 


-8 

247 


_3 


30 


5 


8 
68 




133 




2,527 
13 


-8 
-3 


127 
248 

855 


159 
_s 

_ 
_ 


75 


_ 
-8 


6 


_ 



* Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



76 



P.D. Ill 

Abstracts of Reports of Privatei 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 






Property 
reported 


brances on 
Real Estate 


and 
Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Hunt Asylum for Destitute Children . 


$54,917 35 


- 


S104 00 


- 


2 


Huntington Institute for Orphan Children . 


230,208 56 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Immigrants' Home, East Boston, The . 


45,263 89 


- 


4,60! 70 


UOi 11 


4 


Industrial Aid Society .... 


69,487 14 


- 


10,778 92 


- 


5 


Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed 












Children ...... 


1,812,373 27 


- 


10,167 34 


1,050 00 


6 


Industrial School for Girls .... 


203,912 21 


- 


150 00 


1,826 45 


7 


Infants^ Hospital (50 beds) 


640,506 63 


- 


37,047 75 


- 


8 


Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor . 


116,702 00 


- 


21,053 00 


- 


9 


Instructive District Nursing Association 


537,206 70 


- 


17,897 25 


- 


10 


Isaac Alberts Memorial Aid Association 


128 09 


_ 


891 00 


_ 


11 


Jacoby Club of Boston .... 


6,071 90 


- 


3,793 00 


- 


12 


Jamaica Plain Community Conference 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Jamaica Plain Dispensary .... 


54,076 11 


- 


- 


197 92 


14 


Jamaica Plain Neighborhood House Association 


25,018 35 


l£2,000 00 


5,884 97 


183 00 


15 


Jewish Anti-Tuberculosis Association . 


8,226 46 


_3 


1,795 00 


6,216 69 


16 


Jewish Big Brother Association of Boston 


- 


- 


7,865 35 


- 


17 


Jewish Children's Aid Society of Boston 


1,940 82 


_ 


1,709 89 


255 58 


18 


Jewish Children's Bureau of Boston, Inc. 1 . 










19 


Jewish Maternity Clinic Association 


3,737 47 


2,750 00 


3,552 51 


596 59 


20 


Jewish Tuberculosis Sanatorium of Massa- 
chusetts i ..... 










21 


John Boylston's Charitable Donations for the 
Benefit and Support of Aged Poor Persons, 
and of Orphans and Deserted Children, 
Trustees of 1 . 










22 


John H. Storer Student Loan Fund, Incor- 












porated ...... 


4,938 36 


- 


- 


- 


23 


John Howard Industrial Home 


121,956 06 


- 


263 00 


- 


24 


Joseph Herman Trust Fund, Inc., The 


11,287 92 


- 


500 00 


- 


25 


Judge Baker Foundation .... 


87,372 75 


- 


28,268 75 


59 00 


26 


Junior League of Boston, Inc., The 


12,721 77 


- 


13,194 45 


22,789 81 


27 


Keith Fund, Inc. ..... 


933,282 38 


- 


- 


- 


28 


Kfar Debian Society, Inc. .... 


214 50 


- 


43 00 


- 


29 


Knights of Pythias of North America, South 
America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Aus- 












tralia, Benefit Association 


73,891 46 


20,000 00 


14 00 


6,401 82 


30 


Ladies Auxiliary to Company L, Sixth Regi- 












ment, Massachusetts National Guard, Inc. 


21 71 


- 


258 95 


- 


31 


Ladies Benevolent Circle of the Clarendon 












Street Baptist Church .... 


11,813 09 


- 


17 47 


- 


32 


Ladies' Helping Hand Auxiliary to the Home 
for Destitute Jewish Children 1 










33 


Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts 


60 63 


- 


140 00 


2,565 89 


34 


Ladies' Lyceum Union 1 










35 


Ladies' Unity Club 6 . 


89,699 10 


- 


9,061 18 


5,333 04 


36 


Lawrence Avenue Free Loan Association 


3,427 30 


_3 


269 00 


8,302 50 


37 


League of Women for Community Service 


11,699 03 


2,000 00 


2,862 08 


281 20 


38 


Lend a Hand Society .... 


97,700 35 


- 


8,617 56 


92 90 


39 


Leopold Morse Home for Infirm Hebrews and 












Orphanage ...... 


97,214 82 


- 


- 


- 


40 


Lincoln House Association .... 


362,648 98 


- 


24,151 50 


1,505 99 


41 


Little House, Inc., The .... 


7,103 21 


- 


4,460 00 


2,217 50 


42 


Lord's Day League of New England . 


157,569 23 


- 


7,743 39 


- 


43 


Lucy Stone Home, The .... 


10,602 63 


_ 


2,021 16 


- 


44 


Lucy Wheelock Kindergarten Alumnae Asso- 












ciation Incorporated, The 


20,365 14 


- 


1,431 38 


668 18 


45 


Lutheran Board of Missions, Inc. 


6,049 18 


- 


793 53 


- 


46 


Lutheran Immigrant Board, Boston, Massa- 












chusetts, Inc., The ..... 


33,502 00 


- 


3,475 00 


3,950 28 


47 


Marie Dewing Faelton Charitable Association, 












Inc. ....... 


19,227 83 


- 


1,036 47 


- 


48 


Masonic Education and Charity Trust 


1,550,227 38 


-3 


- 


- 


49 


Massachusetts Anti-Saloon League, Inc. 


7,575 57 


~ 


- 


- 



None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 



77 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 














Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$3,319 88 




$3,423 88 


$2,510 58 


$225 00 


{ f 

7 
6 


} 31 


31 


15 


1 


13,165 35 

311 38 

4,033 37 


$550 00 


13,165 35 
5,370 19 
14,812 29 


13,333 65 

6,005 76 

14,874 61 


3,139 31 
11,332 04 


_3 

2,868 
3,547 


_8 

2,716 
3,547 


_3 


2 
3 

4 


65,409 48 

12,329 98 

29,414 21 

82 00 


77,083 24 

10,000 00 
20,062 00 


153,710 06 
14,306 43 
76,461 96 
41,197 00 


66,675 26 
14,886 67 
68,424 63 
33,079 00 


39,375 40 
3,770 00 

_3 


57 

_3 

24 


161 

26 

855 

181 


161 
11 

44 
181 


" 


5 

6 

7 

8 


27,213 75 


/ 5,000 00 4 
\ 18,500 00 


} 63,611 00 

891 00 
4,336 66 


26,799 43 


- 


- 


_3 


_3 


_8 


9 


543 66 


929 00 
3,787 49 


2,080 00 


I 5 


24 
244 


24 
244 


- 


10 

11 

12 
13 
14 

15 


2,652 60 
245 76 
223 53 


- 


2,850 52 
6,313 73 
8,297 82 


1,161 87 
6,857 03 
8,280 85 


550 00 
4,722 10 


1 
3 

{ [" 


1,103 
1,300 

22 


1,103 
638 


_S 


- 


- 


7,865 35 


7.865 35 


7,096 61 


} 200 


200 


- 


16 


17 00 


- 


1,982 47 


2,284 18 


- 


100 


100 


~ 


17 
18 
19 

20 


8 97 




4,158 07 


4,160 43 


2.087 00 


3 








243 08 

7,033 49 

423 60 


18,500 00 


243 08 

25,796 49 

923 60 


5,815 63 


2,400 00 


1 


41 
244 


9 

244 


122 


21 

22 
23 
24 


4,651 08 


/ 1,347 50 4 
I 10,000 00 


J 42,978 83 


29,708 83 


24,247 60 


8 


-3 


_s 


_s 


25 


134 60 


_ 


36,273 56 


32,135 67 


2,418 85 


{ I' 


J 22 


- 


- 


26 


50,428 09 




50,428 09 


112,275 51 


- 




/ 532 

I io 


} ,0 


- 


27 


- 


- 


43 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28 


333 09 


- 


6,748 91 


7,442 49 


2,242 00 


{ V 


} 150 


- 


14 


29 


- 


- 


258 95 


263 45 


- 




{ V 


} « 


2 


30 


547 81 


-, 


565 28 


1,618 70 


77 00 


1 


{ r 


} • 


1 


31 


- 


- 


2,705 89 


2,683 89 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 

33 
34 
35 
36 


2,359 43 


38,550 00 


55,303 65 
8,571 50 


6,276 39 
8,729 50 


2,968 50 
75 00 


4 
l 6 


10 


10 


- 


1,948 74 
5,182 14 


f 1,000 00 * 
\ 250 00 


5,517 08 

} 14,642 60 


5,225 63 
13,051 78 


1,433 00 
4,340 00 


3 
3 


/ 29 2 
I 17,007 
/ 342 
I 248 


} 136 
j 240 


106 
5 


37 
38 


6,068 20 


- 


6,068 20 


4,104 00 


100 00 


1 


/ I 2 


J - 


-3 


39 


15,650 58 


- 


41,221 61 


39,979 84 


29,419 64 


27 


/ 32 

\ 780 


| 80 


- 


40 


271 99 


- 


6,949 71 


6,900 67 


5,296 97 


5 




- 


-8 


41 


15,904 70 


4,874 00 


28,522 09 


24,812 78 


12,927 57 


{ r 


1,803 


- 


- 


42 


-' 


- 


2,021 16 


2,021 16 


- 


1,803 


- 


43 


12 08 
226 64 


4,143 58 « 


2,111 64 

226 64 


1,800 79 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


14 
45 


- 


- 


7,427 58 


8,759 81 


1,890 00 


{ r 


} 305 


80 


1 


16 


860 46 


136 01 


2,052 94 


1,100 00 


_ 


_ 


11 


_ 


-8 


47 


74,291 72 


110,512 83 ^ 


74,291 72 


59,793 44 


2,080 00 


i 


{ 12 

I 15 


> :' 


3 


IS 


11 25 


- 


11 25 


68 55 


- 


- 


- 


49 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



Report for 15 months. 



78 



p.d. 17.; 

Abstracts of Reports of Privatel 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Boston — Con. 
Massachusetts Association for Occupational 

Therapy, Inc. .... 

Massachusetts Association for Promoting the 

Interests of the Adult Blind 

Massachusetts Baptist Charitable Society 
Massachusetts Baptist Convention 1 
Massachusetts Branch of the Shut-in Society 

Inc. 8 ..... 
Massachusetts Branch of the Woman's Auxili 
ary to the National Council of the Protes 
tant Episcopal Church in the United State, 
of America, The .... 

Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society 

Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society (Sum' 

mer Street Fire Fund) 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Associa 

tion ...... 



Massachusetts Charitable Society 
Massachusetts Child Labor Committee (In 
corporated) ..... 

Massachusetts Civic League 

Massachusetts Congregational Charitable So^ 
ciety ...... 

Massachusetts Congregational Conference and 
Missionary Society 

Massachusetts Department of the Ladies of 
the Grand Army of the Republic 

Massachusetts Division of the International 
Sunshine Society .... 

Massachusetts Elks Scholarship Foundation 
Inc. ...... 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (23 
beds) 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 
McLean Hospital, Belmont (772 beds) 

Massachusetts Health Company l 
Massachusetts Home 

Massachusetts Home Missionary Society 6 
Massachusetts Homeopathic Hospital 7 
Massachusetts Housing Association Incor 

porated ....... 

Massachusetts League of Girls' Clubs, Incor 

porated 
Massachusetts Lying-in Hospital . 
Massachusetts Maternity and Foundling Hos 

pital Corporation l . 
Massachusetts Medical Benevolent Society 
Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals (514 beds) 
Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital, Inc. (35 

beds) . 
Massachusetts Prison Association 
Massachusetts Royal Arcanum Hospital Fund 

Association, Inc. .... 
Massachusetts Society for Aiding Discharged 

Prisoners ..... 

Massachusetts Society for Social Hygiene 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children 

Massachusetts Society for the University Edu 
cation of Women ..... 

Massachusetts Teachers' Federation . 

Massachusetts Trustees of the International 
Committee of the Young Men's Christian 
Association for Army and Navy Work, Inc. 

Massachusetts Tuberculosis League, Inc. 

Massachusetts Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union ...... 



?500 09 

244,610 28 
270,639 99 



28,463 28 


59,289 27 


53,510 06 


673,023 78 


201,087 83 


1,059 68 


559 24 


284,586 60 


1,739,178 56 



2,051 75 

121 76 

10,037 79 

1,671,889 58 

17,004,385 97 

81,684 36 

908,859 56 
14,305 25 



85,489 76 
4,649,336 10 

153,536 72 
47,366 27 

614 74 

152,271 09 
3,169 29 

2,32P,?f 4 73 

1.225.3C 6 81 

46,331 24 
34,457 60 



604,199 33 
20,676 38 



19,683 48 



9,000 00 



10,000 00 



5,000 00 



112,000 00 



1,078 00 


$1,889 40 


5,888 50 


7,136 16 


1,896 59 


- 



925 72 



832 00 
75 00 

10,914 74 

16,054 10 

99,628 66 

1,283 55 

345 00 

5,100 00 

29,224 99 

561,945 44 

7,148 32 



7 005 95 



199 00 
212,393 91 

32,455 29 
1,343 50 

585 25 

591 80 

7,282 67 

36,008 13 
197,566 46 

561 50 

13,567 26 



23,525 50 
1,637 00 



16,077 71 



181 80 
726 13 



159 94 
306 56 

339,203 33 

1,963,255 15 

18,384 00 



3,008 37 



462,994 64 
47,129 68 



103,518 86 



1,068 25 
13,340 47 



54,952 60 
52,040 03 



3,483 63 



- None. i No report. 

6 Name changed to Massachusetts Congregational 



2 Organizations aided. 3 Not stated. 

Conference and Missionary Society. 



Pt. II. 



79 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 














Interest, 

Dividend.' , 

Annuities 

and Rental 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditure. 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Numbfi 
c f Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 

aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
vidur Is 




$1,367 00 




$2,981 07 


$2,547 37 


$1,200 00 


l 6 








1 


6,883 20 


$76,000 00 


95,907 £6 


17,707 85 


4,684 69 


6 


/ 22 

1 300 


} - 


150 


2 


13,916 56 


550 00 


16.303 15 


16,917 81 


600 00 


2* 


55 


55 


-3 


3 
4 

5 


1,188 79 


2,500 00 


4,614 51 


1,852 08 






12 




-3 


6 


2,421 08 


- 


2,421 08 


2,535 95 


250 00 


/ l 5 
1 1 


252 

2 


} : ' 


1 


7 


2.125 68 


- 


2,125 68 


477 25 


50 00 


1 


1 


_s 


2 


8 


141.743 42 


- 


142,575 42 


117,115 03 


40,453 36 


/ 1 { 
1 32 


} 197 


-3 


- 


9 


9,134 90 


- 


9,209 90 


5,679 90 


400 00 


2 E 

/ l f 
I 3 


5 

} i. 


_S 


- 


10 


344 78 


- 


11,524 61 


12,124 58 


7.041 91 


- 


- 


11 


5 65 


- 


16.795 88 


16,333 24 


11,118 43 


/ 1 E 
I 5 


} - 


" 


- 


12 


16,664 36 


- 


16,664 36 


16,947 65 


300 00 


2 B 


59 


59 


-? 


13 


88,937 01 


88,231 94 ^ 


188,565 67 


191,051 38 


33,172 76 


/ 3 s 

I 11 


r ~ 8 


_8 


_3 


14 


76 46 


- 


1,519 05 


1,940 61 


476 10 


/ 25 
I 5 


J 22 


- 


- 


15 


- 


- 


674 06 


809 83 


5 40 


_3 


130 


130 


14 


16 


175 37 


- 


175 37 


30 00 


- 


- 


■ 


- 


- 


17 


60,880 71 


/ 236 09 ' 
\ 2,370 98 


} 429,230 01 


500,646 54 


246,443 55 


195 


8,179 


626 


- 


18 


400,834 87 


/ 125,034 05 < 
\ 170,763 22 


} 2,663,337 82 


2,474,222 77 


_3 


1,110 


32,120 


_3 


- 


19 


807 11 


3,750 00 


21,272 57 


39,648 63 


7,401 30 


11 


85 


11 


- 


20 
21 

22 
23 

24 


34,966 01 


- 


34,966 01 


641 74 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


118 50 


2,700 00 


12,832 82 


11,172 13 


7,183 98 


2,757 


30 2 


" 


- 


25 
26 


3,282 85 
189.130 89 


3,100 00 
89,426 63 < 


6,581 85 
657,024 59 


6.588 66 
752,413 68 


1,470 00 


414 


21 
19,150 


_8 

2,721 


- 


27 
28 
29 


433 56 
1,483 30 


- 


50,072 77 
2,832 80 


57,779 39 
5,653 80 


20,328 20 
4,000 00 


29 
1» 


1,062 
_s 


141 

_s 


_s 


30 
31 


5 36 


- 


590 61 


610 50 


150 00 


25 


28 


- 


- 


32 


7,115 02 


- 


7,706 82 


6,94?- 86 


2,500 00 


15 


1,469 


1,469 


- 


33 


130 96 


- 


7,413 63 


5,403 46 


3,731 00 


{ r 


} - 


- 


- 


34 


92,770 43 


/ 226,972 44 < 
\ 65.000 00 


\ 297,297 42 


249,795 16 


144,611 60 


I 35 

\ 50 


} 838,436" 


830,694' 


- 


35 


43,096 19 


J 77,116 88" 
\ 269.201 59 


} 503,864 24 


230,286 91 


159,561 28 


92 


14,324 


14,324 


- 


36 


2,178 78 


6.500 00< 


3,713 03 


3,948 33 


75 00 


1 


34 


34 


_ 


37 


666 29 


- 


27,566 52 


25,286 25 


9,256 60 


{ r 


} " 


- 


- 


3S 


2,132 97 
723 58 


- 


80,611 07 
54,480 33 


81,301 16 
48,076 86 


40,550 95 
12,762 57 


26 
6 


_a 


_s 


- 


30 

40 


1,794 23 


- 


21,355 57 


20,668 71 


4,432 00 


{ V 


} '-' 


_s 


_s 


41 



* Restricted to capital. 5 Paid officers. 

7 Name changed to Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals. 



8 Report not due. 
9 Animals. 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 





Total 


Incum- 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 




Property 
reported 


brances on 
Real Estate 


and 
Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Massachusetts Woman's Home Missionary 












Union ....... 


$188,123 48 


- 


?5,684 63 


- 


2 


Massachusetts "Women's Hospital (80 beds) . 


54,033 84 


- 


959 50 


$119,972 15 


3 


Maverick Dispensary of East Boston, The . 


17,060 80 


- 


7,985 56 


5,713 93 


4 


Merrimac Mission, Inc., The 


391 01 


- 


5,613 14 


- 


5 


Michael Anagnos Schools .... 


252,772 64 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Millenium Guild . . . . 


160 81 


- 


121 10 


- 


7 


Morgan Memorial Cooperative Industries 












and Stores, Inc., The .... 


1,221,698 79 


- 


54,105 17 


401,198 79 


8 


Mount Pleasant Home, The 


322,641 88 


$25,000 00 


7,369 13 


8,321 22 


9 


Mount Sinai Hospital Society of Boston, Mass. 1 










10 


Needlewoman's Friend Society, The 


57,308 23 


- 


210 50 


5,348 96 


11 


New England Anti- Vivisection Society 


79,267 59 


- 


2,150 95 


68 63 


12 


New England Baptist Hospital (125 beds) _ . 


1,270,890 04 


64,000 00 


10,614 41 


253,552 29 


13 


New England Branch of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episco- 












pal Church ...... 


63,153 41 


- 


86,737 97 


- 


14 


New England Committee for French Soldiers 
Blinded in Battle, Inc. l . . 










15 


New England Deaconess Association (exclud- 












ing hospitals) ..... 


363,042 88 


8,000 00 


28,342 90 


2.312 71 


16 


New England Deaconess Association (Hospi- 












tal in Boston) (180 beds) 


1,378,776 11 


451,000 00 


25,878 15 


409,948 05 


17 


New England Deaconess Association (Palmer 












Memorial Hospital for Incurables) (75 bed?) 


974,386 89 


300,000 00 


57,431 15 


162,656 26 


18 


New England District of the Christian and 












Missionary Alliance Inc. . . 


19,500 00 


4,720 00 


4,136 78 


99 50 


19 


New England Farm and Garden Association 












Inc. ....... 


20,113 18 


- 


21,343 06 


55,657 12 


20 


New England Grenfell Association 


392,521 09 


_3 


106,097 23 


- 


21 


New England Heart Association . 


1,536 36 


- 


576 48 


- 


22 
23 


New England Home for Little Wanderers 
New England Hospital for Women and Chil- 


1,715,176 44 


~ 


28,760 59 


28,009 29 




dren (240 beds) 


1,474,143 86 


- 


7,461 00 


180,480 41 


24 


New England Kurn Hattin Homes 


25 26 


- 


4,301 50 


- 


25 


New England Watch and Ward Society 


192,551 45 


- 


6,762 00 


1,722 34 


26 


Newsboys' Reading Room Association 


49,623 92 


- 


793 00 


150 00 


27 


Nickerson Home for Children 


33,850 29 


- 


1,500 38 


3,858 50 


28 


Norfolk House Centre .... 


115,784 08 


- 


11,024 58 


1,556 93 


29 


North Bennett Street Industrial School 


168,937 82 


- 


4,134 40 


43,120 47 


30 


North End Diet Kitchen .... 


43,771 33 


_ 


1,921 00 


_ 


31 


North End Dispensary .... 


21,134 90 


_3 


- 


_ 


32 


Norwegian Mission Home .... 


10,535 57 


10,311 00 


687 37 


2,550 75 


33 


Norwegian Old Peoples Home and Charitable 












Association of Greater Boston . 


71,827 52 


- 


2,820 75 


3,022 80 


34 


Nursery Training School of Boston, The 


22,375 37 


- 


9,664 55 


3,594 03 


35 


Nutrition Clinics for Delicate Children, Inc. 7 










36 


Nutrition Clinics, Incorporated . 


1,068 89 


- 


12,210 00 


2,739 60 


:>7 


Oliver Ditson Society for the Relief of Needy 












Musicians ...... 


34,427 31 


- 


_ 


_ 


38 


Order of Sir Galahad ..... 


2,187 46 


- 


3,762 40 


1,340 62 


39 


Order of the Fleur de Lis, Inc. 


33 29 


- 


139 66 


260 23 


to 


Osteopathic Clinic Association of New England 


39 56 


- 




12 20 


41 

42 


Overseers of the Poor of the Town of Boston 
in the Province of Massachusetts Bay in 
New England * .... . 

Pan-Albanian Federation of America "Vatra" 












(The Hearth) Inc., The .... 


22,824 06 


19,000 00 


7,117 71 


839 79 


13 


Pan-Hellenic Relief Organization, Inc. 1 










14 


Pan-Hellenic Union in America 1 










45 


Particular Council Society St. Vincent de Paul 












of the City of Boston, The * . . . 










16 


Permanent Charity Fund, Incorporated 












Committee of the ..... 


4,893,399 04 


- 


10,000 00 


- 


17 


Permanent Peace Fund, Trustees of 


147,242 96 


_ 


_ 


_ 


48 


Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (246 beds) 


6,581,122 75 


- 


22,574 00 


431,017 4 71 


10 


Phineas G. Parmenter Foundation, Inc. 


1,986 64 


- 


425 00 


_ 


50 


Piatker Relief Association, Inc. x 











None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



81 



Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided ex- 
elusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$8,158 50 


$53,270 23 


$67,113 36 


$28,003 29 








202 






1 


4,400 64 


65,473 72^ 


125,985 67 


100,853 93 


_3 




42 


1,545 


41 


- 


2 


1,098 67 


- 


14,798 16 


15,001 92 


$9,709 76 




14 


6,294 


5,346 


_8 


3 


- 


- 


5,613 14 


5,352 12 


2,217 70 




3 


32,640 


32,640 


100 


4 


15,085 43 


- 


15,085 43 


19,191 11 


-8 




30 


71 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


121 10 


115 96 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


11,903 97 


/ 5,801 63 ^ 
\ 20,949 64 


1 478,803 51 


454,599 39 


300,096 90 


J 

I 


3 5 
130 


} 10,000 


1,019 


679 


7 


4.505 67 


/ 1,162 83" 
\ 41,383 52 


} 61,579 54 


31,268 77 


10,877 11 




15 


49 


1 


- 


8 


6,005 82 


, _ 


11,565 28 


11 630 49 


2,990 60 




2 


85 


85 


_ 


9 
10 


3,884 75 


6,588 59 


12,718 18 


5,943 99 


2,980 10 




3 


- 


- 


- 


11 


10,733 35 


13,500 00 


280,277 05 


210,187 20 


70,964 11 




71 


2,631 


76 


- 


12 


7,476 09 


/ 2,097 31^ 
\ 57,529 30 


J 151,743 36 


152,667 39 


400 00 




1 


_3 


-3 


_3 


13 


10,480 05 


2,748 754 


36,630 82 


67,389 31 


39,942 32 


{ 


35 

27 


} -' 


_3 


_3 


1-1 

15 


10,690 70 


1.182 514 


449,316 88 


499,647 57 


140,990 21 




212 


4,699 


_3 


- 


16 


11,280 63 


/ 2,048 874 
\ 3,382 78 


} 222,118 82 


237,009 84 


54,545 16 




63 


1,955 


_3 


" 


17 


1,766 72 


- 


6,038 60 


4,632 41 


1,955 00 




3 


l 2 


" 


- 


18 


162 15 


- 


77,162 33 


66,788 04 


6,317 52 




6 


1,676 


8 


- 


19 


17,522 14 


3,000 OO 4 


41,129 88 


7,044 09 


3,302 00 


J 

I 


I s 
3 


12 

_3 


> I s 


_3 


20 


15 01 


- 


591 49 


216 56 


40 00 


1 


12 


- 


21 


73,448 74 


/ 494 724 
\ 127.033 86 


} 257,287 48 


170,159 18 


89,959 16 


{ 


15 

63 


662 

1,175 


| 391 


- 


22 


50,836 20 


52,420 38 


290,697 99 


248,871 20 


17,469 13 




110 


13,362 


259 


_ 


23 


4 67 


- 


4,306 17 


4,325 00 


- 




- 


_3 


_3 


_3 


24 


9,466 43 


- 


17,950 77 


16,255 64 


12,614 51 


/ 
1 


I 5 
3 


122 

190 


> :l 


_3 


25 


3,616 70 


- 


4,559 70 


1,849 58 


360 00 


1 


400 


- 


21'. 


742 69 


500 00 


6,606 87 


5,598 70 


1,997 00 




4 


65 


17 


- 


27 


9,004 73 


2,303 524 


21,363 24 


27,606 26 


13,464 71 




45 


2,500 


_3 


_3 


28 


5,279 83 


- 


88,534 70 


85,104 63 


47,901 00 




87 


/ 32 
1 3,250 
1,378 


} 2,600 


- 


29 


2,498 78 


- 


4,419 78 


4,168 02 


- 




- 


1,378 


- 


30 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




— 


_ 


— 


— 


;;i 


- 


- 


3,238 12 


3,218 33 


164 00 




1 


343 


25 


- 


32 


1,817 55 


- 


7,661 10 


4,617 55 


855 00 


[ 


35 

1 


} » 

93 


- 


_3 


33 


314 05 


- 


13,802 18 


15,782 59 


9,993 28 


10 


6 


77 


34 
35 


32 45 


- 


14,982 05 


14,135 35 


9,712 68 


I 


2 


} 


- 


- 


36 


1,964 04 


_ 


1,964 04 


1,954 01 


_ 




_ 


27 


_3 


_3 


.",7 


46 77 


- 


5,275 06 


4,446 54 


2,249 38 




2 


- 


- 


- 


38 


- 


- 


399 89 


460 71 


- 




- 


- 


- 


_S 


;!!) 






12 20 


39 39 


15 00 




1 


22 


7 


_3 


40 


1,020 00 


- 


9,639 45 


10,064 49 


5,550 00 


! 


15 

1 


} - 


- 


- 


41 

42 

13 

11 


222,778 56 




232,778 56 


226,597 59 


9,100 00 


J 
I 


15 

2 


} 1152 

12 






45 
46 


9,636 83 


- 


9,636 83 


9,636 83 


750 00 


2 


_ 


_ 


47 


218,858 98 


- 


666,598 69 


665,278 86 


304,760 45 




257 


12,687 


1,068 


- 


48 


53 14 




478 14 
















411 
50 



Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



Name changed to Nutrition Clinics, Incorporated. 



P.D 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 


Incum- 
brances on 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 
and 






reported 


Real Estate 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Plymouth Hospital Corporation of Boston . 


S3.912 71 


- 


_ 


_ 


2 


Polish Home of The Little Flower, Inc. 6 


50,631 88 


$20,000 00 


$13,047 64 


81,488 00 


3 


Portuguese Immigrant Aid Society of the 
United States of America, Inc., The 1 . 










4 


Preachers' Aid Society of the New England 
Annual Conference of the Methodist Epis- 












copal Church ..... 


659,391 70 


- 


28,260 00 


- 


5 


Pultusker Benevolent Association 1 










6 


Rabbinical School of Boston, Inc. 


89 12 


_3 


3,904 55 


- 


7 


Resthaven Corporation .... 


41,565 30 


10,350 00 


3,154 81 


1,827 34 


8 


Robert B. Brigham Hospital for Incurables 












(115 beds) 


1,822,599 69 


- 


- 


76,199 43 


9 


Robert Gould Shaw House, Inc. . 


71,596 54 


- 


7,688 70 


1,555 73 


10 


Robert Treat Paine Association, The . 


109,812 33 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Rotch Travelling Scholarship, Inc. 


81,639 36 


- 


_ 


_ 


12 


Roxbury Boys' Club and Institute of Industry ' 










13 


Roxbury Charitable Society 


189,810 28 


- 


1,483 10 


- 


14 


Roxbury Female Benevolent Society 


11,442 63 


- 


- 


- 


15 


Roxbury Home for Aged Women 


394,715 65 


- 


2,824 76 


2,021 03 


16 


Roxbury Ladies' Aid and Fuel Society 


1,235 98 


- 


16,848 47 


50 92 


17 


Roxbury Ladies' Bikur Cholim Association 7 










18 


Roxbury Ladies' Club .... 


268 97 


- 


137 75 


623 42 


19 


Roxbury Neighborhood House Association . 


50,914 92 


- 


16,453 25 


2,232 01 


20 


Rudnick Charitable Foundation, Inc. . 


34,852 16 


- 


- 


- 


21 


Rufus F. Dawes Hotel Association 


116,637 25 


- 


_ 


9,310 75 


22 


Rutland Corner House .... 


109,521 62 


- 


_ 


475 45 


23 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital of Boston (300 beds) 


1,127,725 78 


204,506 15 


72,052 99 


436,977 53 


24 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital Nurses' Alumnae 












Association, Inc. ..... 


2,283 76 


- 


481 70 


19 59 


25 


St. Joseph's Association of Boston 1 










26 


St. Joseph's Home ..... 


70,109 02 


10,000 00 


1,217 00 


13,226 32 


27 


St. Luke's Home for Convalescents 


323,662 30 


- 


1,916 00 


1,747 57 


28 


St. Mary's Infant Asylum and Lying-in Hos- 












pital (175 beds) 


296,142 24 


- 


8,118 56 


123,393 15 


29 


St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 


337,919 26 


- 


2,274 25 


20,821 18 


30 


Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Inc. 


4,260,967 67 


1,518,554 44 


543,237 57 


431,801 36 


31 


Sanders Fund, Inc. ..... 


1,379 70 


- 


20,865 85 


- 


32 


Scandinavian Sailors' Home, Inc. 


23,467 65 


13,000 00 


252 76 


15,258 47 


33 


Scientific Temperance Federation 


20,064 72 


- 


14,303 66 


4,274 18 


34 


Scollay Square Service Club (Incorporated) . 


12,125 63 


- 


7,587 53 


881 27 


35 


Scots' Charitable Society .... 


76,500 99 


- 


400 00 


449 24 


36 


Sears and Other Funds, Trustees of 


290,627 64 


- 


- 


- 


37 


Shaw Fund for Mariners' Children 


622,063 32 


- 


- 


- 


38 


Sisterhood of Congregation Beth Hamidrash 












Hagadol, Inc. ..... 


541 49 


- 


223 55 


_ 


39 


Sisters of Lord Beaconsfield Aid Society, Inc. 


316 76 


- 


71 79 


- 


40 


Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians 












and Colored People in Massachusetts, Inc. 


9,900 02 


- 


2,298 95 


- 


41 


Sooieta di Mutual Soccorso e Beneficenza 












Canicattinese, Incorporated 


858 60 


- 


377 50 


25 00 


42 


Society for Ministerial Relief 


387,214 30 


- 


1,063 50 


- 


43 


Society for the Relief of Aged or Disabled 












Episcopal Clergymen .... 


203,878 11 


- 


- 


- 


44 


Society for the Relief of the Widows and Or- 
phans of Clergymen of the Protestant Epis- 












copal Church ... 


248,645 46 


- 


- 


- 


45 


Society of St. Margaret (St. Monica's Home) 












(20 beds) 


40,050 95 


- 


6,892 59 


3,481 21 


46 


Sofia American Schools, Inc. 


412,846 92 


- 


90,214 33 


53,896 77 


47 


South Boston Neighborhood House 


25,158 14 


3,000 00 


4,148 62 


1,165 53 


48 


South Boston Samaritan Society 


1,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


49 


South End Day Nursery .... 


49,539 42 


4,000 00 


6,096 50 


829 25 


50 


South End Day Nursery Auxiliary 


9,667 22 


- 


671 25 


5,386 58 


51 


South End Diet Kitchen .... 


61,519 28 


- 


2,810 50 


- 



None. 



1 No report. 



7 Name changed to Greater Boston Bikur Hospital. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 



83 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 


















Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditure; 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Numbei 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$60 59 
8 07 


- 


$60 59 
17,002 23 


$35 60 
7,923 52 


$1,302 00 




6 




39 


9 


" 


1 

2 
3 


33,948 74 


$7,900 00 4 


62,208 74 


11,167 05 


3,050 00 


{ 


16 

1 


> 


119 


119 


- 


4 


- 


- 


3,904 55 


4,280 43 


3,513 37 




6 




_3 


_3 


_3 


5 

6 


27 60 


- 


5,009 75 


4,791 28 


2,054 62 


/ 
I 


l 5 
5 


} 


22 


~ 


" 


7 


68,181 82 
815 64 


3,000 00 
50,000 00 4 


149,086 38 
10,067 07 


217,204 86 
9,800 17 


107,573 93 
6,265 70 




105 
11 




681 
550 


251 
415 


- 


8 
9 


5,570 46 


- 


5,570 46 


3,889 52 


50 00 




1 


{ 


432 

_3 


} - 

3 


_3 


10 


4,347 38 


- 


4,347 38 


3,998 38 


- 




- 


3 


" 


11 

12 
13 
14 


9,736 91 
550 65 


- 


11,220 01 
550 65 


11,069 47 
641 50 


- 




- 




22 


- 


341 
2 


20,256 59 


6,677 89 


31,780 27 


22,005 59 


6,745 18 


{ 


I 6 

9 


} 


26 


- 


- 


15 


68 75 


- 


16,918 57 


18,867 64 


1,722 40 




2 


{ 


82 

_3 


} -' 


90 


16 

17 


- 


- 


1,027 07 


758 10 


- 




- 


{ 


42 
1 


} > 

_3 


_ 


18 


113 82 


- 


18,799 08 


17,620 56 


12,885 70 




17 


1,543 


-3 


19 


1,342 76 


- 


1,342 76 


1,217 50 


- 




- 


/ 
I 


472 

6 

37,503 s 

540 
16,668 


5 ! 

270 
5,087 


- 


20 


18 00 
7,586 15 
1,497 39 


: 


9,328 75 

8,061 60 

511,822 57 


10,260 59 

7,241 66 

494,218 16 


5,068 60 

3,427 05 

163,605 82 




4 

4 

152 


~ 


21 
22 
23 


98 75 


- 


600 04 


538 74 


50 00 




l 6 




- 


- 


- 


24 

25 
26 


743 58 


- 


15,186 90 


14,034 36 


3,628 00 




12 




115 


69 


_ 


21,330 33 


/ 2,145 77 4 
\ 10,867 55 


} 35,889 00 


23,156 53 


10,493 75 




12 




351 


202 


- 


27 


1,621 37 
8,781 80 


18,247 61 
7,522 85 


151,380 69 
39,400 08 


142,191 43 
21,142 06 


16,830 89 
3,828 00 




77 
20 




217 
100 


13 
5 


" | 


28 
29 


670 00 


/ 19,542 71 4 
1 12,147 47 


j 896,434 38 


935,848 10 


299,960 69 


j 
{ 


2" 
350 




64 2 

278,232 


\ 112,244 


11,227 


30 


12 33 


- 


20,878 18 


19,994 37 


1 200 00 


3 5 
I 




10 2 

164 
842 


} 164 
36 


18 


31 


359 17 


- 


15,870 40 


13 553 99 


3,620 00 


6 




2 


32 


403 76 


8,750 00 


27,731 60 


12,159 40 


9,082 00 


I 


1» 

4 
4 
1 
1=> 


} 


- 


- 


_ 


33 


517 49 
4 012 18 
14,541 41 


: 


9,035 08 
4,861 42 
14 541 41 


9,903 41 
5 043 48 
14,76^ 00 


2,616 71 
300 00 
500 00 


40,000 * 
134 

22 


40,000 s 
134 


125 

2 


34 

35 
36 


29,855 48 


- 


29,855 48 


31,451 40 


3,600 00 


I 


l 6 
1 




22 

378 


} 




37 


- 


- 


1,090 13 
71 79 


1,222 15 
123 58 


_ 




: 




62 

-3 


- 3 


- s 


38 
39 


- 


- 


2,698 69 


2,575 53 


- 




- 




-3 


_3 


_3 


■10 


22 68 
21,536 49 


- 


425 18 

22,599 99 


394 53 
21,923 23 


200 00 




26 




51 


" 


6 


4! 
42 


13,875 81 


- 


13,875 81 


7,574 24 


- 




- 




9 


9 


- 


43 


12,534 44 


- 


12,534 44 


11,682 58 


- 




_ 




71 


71 


_s 


44 


842 30 


2,000 00" 


11,116 20 


10,911 94 


4,377 25 




11 




71 


33 


_ 


45 


17,960 70 


400,000 00 * 


104,128 41 


90.016 79 


42,871 62 


; 


45 

50 

8 

8 


! 


385 


_ 


_ 


it; 


10 08 

54 00„ 

1,596 41| 

323 64] 


- 


5,324 23 

54 00 

8,688 81 

6,381 47 


6,367 88 

24 00 

7.977 28 

5,069 65 


5,000 22 
4,282 70 


416 
53 

72 

12 


9 
53 

4 


179 


47 
is 
19 
50 


3,135 11 


~ 


5,945 61 


5,929 82 


- 




- 


1 


12 

1,465 


} -■ 


_3 


51 



4 Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. « Report for 20 months. 8 Attendance. 



84 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 






Property 
reported 


brances on 
Real Estate 


and 
Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


South End Dispensary and Hospital . 


$7,066 24 


- 


$4,883 50 


- 


2 


South End House Association, The 


380,196 36 


?20,000 00 


23,312 72 


$9,647 45 


3 


South End Music School .... 


47,326 41 


12,500 00 


8,509 80 


8,756 46 


4 


Southern Middlesex Health Association 6 


75,000 00 


7,000 00 


7,844 09 


- 


5 


Speech Readers Guild of Boston Ihcorpor- 












rated, The 


41,966 21 


10,000 00 


8.630 69 


4,601 80 


6 


Stearns Fund, Inc. ..... 


60,243 97 


- 


65,780 00 


477 60 


7 


Students' Aid Foundation, Incorporated, The 


730 38 


- 


- 


750 26 


8 


Students' House Corporation 


94,501 64 


55,000 00 


1,217 88 


44,637 47 


9 


Sunny Bank Home ... 


87,137 52 


- 


- 


899 65 


10 


Sunnyside Day Nursery 


48,252 60 


5,000 00 


14,336 11 


763 54 


11 


Swedish Home of Peace ("Fridhem") . 


12,200 10 


3,000 00 


475 28 


6,173 01 


12 


Swiss Benevolent Society .... 


2,001 88 


- 


30 00 


176 00 


13 


Syrian Ladies' Aid Society, The . 


3,825 27 


- 


2,012 02 


- 


14 


Syrian Roman-Catholic Melkite Society 1 










15 


Tabernacle Society of Boston, The 


2,214 10 


- 


2.535 52 


1,120 00 


16 


Talitha Cumi Maternity Home and Hospital 












(Talitha Cumi Home) .... 


287,252 44 


- 


13,327 80 


7,203 87 


17 


Three-fold Movement-League of Neighbors, 
Fellowship of Faiths, Union of East and 












West (Incorporated), The 7 


- 


- 


3,412 11 


1,831 25 


18 


Travelers' Aid Society of Boston, Inc. . 


13,713 22 


- 


28,018 40 


- 


19 


Tremont Dispensary, The 1 










20 


Trinity Church Home for the Aged (Rachel 












Allen Memorial) ..... 


151,864 75 


- 


4,226 00 


7,482 00 


21 


Trinity Neighborhood House and Day Nursery 


36,770 98 


- 


5,558 79 


2,478 53 


22 


Union Rescue Mission .... 


79,689 66 


- 


15,166 03 


_ 


23 


Unitarian Foundation, Inc. 


15,789 04 


- 


71,086 58 


33 25 


24 


Unitarian Service Pension Society 


494,987 75 


- 


14,546 28 


- 


25 


United Hebrew Benevolent Association of 












Boston . . . 


19,911 25 


- 


_ 


- 


26 


Vernon Advent Christian Home . 


15,801 21 


- 


913 99 


3,765 73 


27 


Vincent Memorial Hospital (22 beds) . 


372,716 55 


- 


11,761 77 


17,835 49 


28 


Walker Missionary Homes, Inc. . 


187,078 10 


- 


3,211 57 


10,456 02 


29 


Washingtonian Home .... 


145,478 92 


- 


3,936 47 


16,935 00 


30 


Welcome House, Inc. .... 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


31 


Wells Memorial Association 


61,000 05 


10,000 00 


10,400 42 


4,527 54 


32 


West End House, Inc., The 


439,224 31 


- 


192 00 


2,940 50 


33 


West End Matan Basaiser Charitable Associa- 












tion ....... 


50 50 


- 


1,269 65 


390 00 


34 


West End Young Men's Hebrew Association 


43,307 08 


28,000 00 


- 


4,353 28 


35 


Westminster Foundation, Inc. 1 . 










36 


Widows' Society in Boston, The . 


286,185 28 


_3 


6,665 00 


- 


37 


William Lawrence Camp, Inc. 


22,197 93 


4,000 00 


4,135 00 


5,117 00 


38 


Winchester Home for Aged Women 


215,646 23 


- 


17,529 02 


2,624 58 


39 


Woman's Auxiliary of the New England Bap- 
tist Hospital * ..... 










40 


Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' 












Charitable Society ..... 


32,114 91 


- 


686 33 


418 99 


41 


Woman's Board of Missions (Congregational) 


548,225 94 


- 


6,181 47 


- 


42 


Woman's Charity Club .... 


291,233 04 


80,000 00 


12,934 52 


3,075 75 


43 


Woman's Home Missionary Society of the 
New England Conference of the Methodist 












Episcopal Church (Cooper Community 


44,983 32 


_3 


4,916 40 


1,274 80 


44 


Woman's Home Missionary Society of the 
New England Conference of the Methodist 












Episcopal Church (Medical Mission) 


47,002 89 


29,400 00 


20,169 97 


13,700 89 


45 


Woman's Seaman's Friend Society 8 


15,026 21 


- 


1,718 60 


85 90 


46 


Woman's Universalist Missionary Society of 












Massachusetts ..... 


48,993 28 


- 


10,015 68 


- 


47 


Women's Educational and Industrial Union . 


72,791 25 


- 


17,668 13 


1,321,406 05 


48 


Women's Educational and Industrial Union, 












Trustees of ..... 


760,425 04 


410,000 00 


- 


- 


49 


Women's Municipal League Committees, 












Incorporated ...... 


532 74 


~ 


6,964 70 


31 56 



None. 



1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



85 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 
and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



$5,000 00 



752 



89 00 

2,000 OO^ 
11,326 33 



2,750 00 

100 00 

758 404 
7,235 79 

1,000 00 4 

5,000 004 
3,104 33 

1,000 00 



17,310 134 



500 004 
13,819 29 
95,576 11 



2,335 31 



1,115 27 



5,000 00 



$6,905 39 

54,138 69 

17,413 35 

9 476 35 

15,682 50 

66,926 34 

67 75 

46,054 63 

4,116 82 

15,997 90 

6,648 29 

281 75 

2,030 18 

3,781 61 

42,412 86 



5,250 11 
31,324 82 



15,214 90 

9,434 30 

15,673 18 
71,435 49 
22,055 44 

872 50 

4,905 14 

38,910 18 

22,396 94 
27 984 46 

22,870 49 
22,459 04 

1,659 65 
4,353 28 

20.944 02 
9,257 35 

15,105 17 



5,651 21 
32,029 46 
111,877 88 



9,721 64 

33,870 86 
3,626 58 

12,589 62 
1,365,824 67 

1,702 35 
7,012 96 



$6,988 91 


47,955 46 


16,683 04 


3 659 92 


17,660 92 


38,671 06 


44,038 88 


6,813 57 


8,875 16 

6,522 28 

140 05 

1,721 34 


5,089 80 


37,865 87 


5,212 12 
27,601 05 


14,348 73 


8,059 21 


15,720 53 
72,434 03 
14 627 29 


872 50 

4,379 41 

46,199 10 


22,499 33 


25,294 18 


23,385 88 
16,279 98 


1,639 15 
4,752 08 


18,544 09 
5,698 54 


14,588 46 


3,077 64 

45,903 49 

6,217 12 


8,011 04 


30,578 96 


2,802 12 


12,699 94 


1,358,290 87 


629 81 


7,710 79 



$4,194 96 

20,588 29 

12,921 35 

2 783 11 


4 

( 15 
1 30 

34 
3 


{ 


3,585 

702 

3.900 

295 

242 

140 


3,585 

} - 

2 

} " 


9,857 26 
1.578 00 


8 

{ V 

14 


{ 


522 
664 

1012 

192 


} 359 
J 192 


12,378 81 


/ 25 

1 18 


\ 


88 


- 


3,112 36 


/ 16 
I 4 


\ 


91 


43 


4,051 00 
1,339 33 


5 
2 




82 

172 

5 

10 


1 
5 
10 


- 


- 




45 


45 


15,651 69 


21 




328 


38 


457 57 
22,019 69 


14 




28,121 


_3 


7,518 00 


9 




23 


_ 


4,429 25 

8,044 46 
1,855 00 


7 

6 

1 


i 


62 

917 
7,400 

122 

73 


} " 

7,363 
73 


2,299 34 

-3 


3 

20 




12 

15 
401 


3 
146 


7,002 54 


9 




164 


- 


10,451 45 


{ .r 


} 


844 


9 


11,011 27 
7,521 00 


26 
11 




1,800 
750 


_3 

211 


277 40 
1,092 00 


is 

1 




190 


_3 


950 04 
982 50 

4,364 00 


1 
10 

/ 1* 
I 6 


} 


118 
113 

31 


118 

28 


251 00 


1 




12 


- 


3,660 00 


9 




470 


170 


12,827 54 
1,545 00 


12 

2 


{ 


24,673 

102 

_3 


7,184 

} - 


06,177 34 


/ I* 

I 375 


1 


-3 

12 

_3 


_3 

} - 


6,147 77 


5 




107,630 


107,630 



1 Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



6 Report for 15 months 



7 Report for 4 months 



86 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 
3 
4 


Boston — ■ Con. 
Women's Scholarship Association 
Wood Memorial Home .... 
Working Girls' Home (St. Helena's House) . 
Y. D. Overseas Memorial, Inc. 


$916 85 

963,801 79 

295,526 05 

26,769 27 


$19,000 00 


$286 00 

357 50 
8,692 02 


$961 65 
88,194 10 


5 


Young Men's Educational Aid Association . 


- 


- 


109 50 


- 


6 

7 
8 


Young Men's Hebrew Association of Boston 
Young Travelers' Aid Society, The 6 
Young Viggianese Club of East Boston 1 


233,284 09 

26,744 82 


25,000 00 


11,065 75 
50 00 


13,340 50 


9 


Boxpord 
Female Charitable Society of West Boxford . 


239 65 


- 


33 55 


130 29 


10 
11 
12 


Braintree 
Braintree Friendly Aid Association 
Braintree Young Men's Christian Association 
Norfolk County Health Association, Inc. 


2,187 50 

1,119 97 

959 81 


- 


3,456 49 
1,125 00 


2,273 68 
18,644 36 


13 


Bridc-ewater 
Bridgewater Visiting Nurse Association 


3,814 86 


- 


723 53 


1,712 42 


14 
15 

16 
17 
18 
19 

20 


Brockton 
Boys' Club of Brockton 1 . 
Brockton Day Nursery .... 

Brockton Girl Scouts, Inc. .... 

Brockton Hospital Company (130 beds) 
Brockton Humane Society, The . 
Brockton Rotary Charitable and Educational 
Association, Inc. ..... 

Brockton Social Service Council, Inc. . 


20,384 85 

1,245 63 

892,848 17 

10,404 42 

1,597 28 
8,382 31 


70,000 00 


1,472 62 

2,232 90 

47,861 29 

240 60 

810 00 
130,624 14 


487 80 

3,540 63 

127,686 69 

758 57 

265 00 


21 


Brockton Visiting Nurse Association 


27,356 49 


- 


14,936 19 


12,739 77 


22 
23 


Brockton Young Men's Christian Association 
Brockton Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion ....... 


536,746 01 
217,964 21 


_3 

10,000 00 


30,807 69 
21,714 56 


31,322 74 
28,313 14 


24 
25 

26 


Community Service of Brockton Inc. l 
Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nursery, 

Trustees of 
Ellis Brett Neighborhood Center of Com- 
munity Service of Brockton, Inc. 


20,540 15 

894 62 


- 


- 


- 


27 
28 


Family Welfare Association of Brockton 
Home for Aged Men in the City of Brockton, 

Trustees of 


1,279 50 
235,185 75 


; 


7,572 41 


3,399 80 


29 


Mothers' League of Brockton, Inc. 1 










30 


Pilgrim Foundation, The .... 


993,380 58 


- 


480 00 


- 


31 


Plymouth County Health Association, Inc. . 


2,047 96 


- 


815 00 


17,213 60 


32 
33 


Sarah J. Pettee Memorial Scholarship Fund, 

Trustees of 
Sprague Neighborhood Centre, Brockton, Inc. ] 


2,529 04 


- 


16 40 


- 


34 


Wales Home for Aged Women 


183,616 16 


- 


3,813 10 


5,751 14 


35 


Woman's Club of Brockton 


12,325 16 


-' 


1,186 96 


9,808 59 


36 


Broo fTLINE 
American Ramabai Association . 


30,160 81 


_ 


565 20 


19 80 


37 


Brookline Friendly Society, The . 


102,766 59 


- 


23,458 68 


8,793 70 


38 
39 
40 


Brookline Service Club, Inc. 
Brooks Hospital (38 beds) .... 
Christian Science Benevolent Association (148 
beds) ....... 


4,739 38 
226,201 76 

1,521,876 25 


70,000 00 


424 70 
6,000 00 

77,571 37 


102,287 90 
241,973 77 


41 


Eloist Ministry, The 


50,751 15 


8,000 00 


7,654 31 


10,216 42 


42 

43 
44 


Frauen Verein ...... 

Free Hospital for Women (94 beds) 
Gulick-Farnsworth Fund, Inc. 


33,405 25 

3,016,841 21 

2,714 83 


10,000 00 


15,251 08 
160,023 58 


2,826 84 
106,079 72 


45 


Cambridge 
Ames Foundation ..... 


11,508 95 


_ 


158 21 


_ 


46 


Avon Home ...... 


323,636 66 


- 


3,788 82 


13,339 68 


47 


Boston and Maine Railroad Employees' Fund, 
Incorporated ...... 


101,438 63 


- 


- 


- 



None, 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



s Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



87 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Legacies 



$2,000 00 
4,000 00 



18,500 00 < 



2,451 63 < 
18,440 37 



19,410 95 



1,262 23 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditure; 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



$1,258 10 

68,176 48 

89,325 91 

9,397 80 

109 50 

25,525 35 
1,354 79 



163 84 



5,790 83 

50 99 

19,799 64 



2,490 22 



3,041 36 

5,799 52 

196,727 15 

5,635 98 

l.lH^O 
130,739 01 

28,773 56 

100,376 53 

53,353 36 



547 66 

35 33 
10,973 57 

8,985 19 

48,446 30 
18,125 12 

100 99 

15,631 79 
11,602 18 

1,740 50 

36,008 70 

424 70 
108,800 31 

343,697 51 

18,428 23 

18,319 43 
378,679 77 



673 96 
35,978 55 

3,508 88 



$1,064 88 

2,888 93 

88,646 61 

312 01 

109 50 

23,765 68 
1,400 00 



47 64 



5,610 50 


19,061 62 


2,697 07 


2,919 42 

5,972 34 

193,959 71 

3,182 49 


1,100 00 
124,155 61 


29,520 66 


98,375 98 


53,038 62 


547 66 


10,799 61 


10,136 38 


44,339 10 



16,926 22 

156 00 

12,012 58 
11,007 04 

1,624 41 

34,290 72 

499 45 
107,075 02 

396,182 00 

18,220 28 

18,376 34 
245,768 35 



8 30 
35,234 04 

2,070 25 



$26,818 81 



3,420 00 
1,929 62 



1,306 94 

1,744 00 

82,245 47 

1,260 00 



3,632 00 
25,570 09 



23,077 78 



4,848 00 
3,210 00 

1,840 00 
3,031 95 

4,858 74 



24,129 29 

52,883 43 
319,639 50 

9,823 25 

5,916 52 
64,350 12 



11,496 58 



33 



16 
46 

194 

2i 

4 

6 

100 



2,047 



1,436 



318 



95 
251 
6.292 
7,500 ? 

6 
152 



2,118 

/ 72 

I 5,480 



222 
105 
292 
70 

1 

18 
152 
306 

2,000 
32 
1,455 

12 

989 

2,189 



633 
3,372 



22 

237 



551 
40 



136 



100 



251 
53 



501 



1,759 



70 



18 
300 



2 000 
273 



124 



633 
905) 



123 



I Restricted to capital, 



6 Paid officers. 



1 Report for 14 months. 



7 Animals, 



88 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 
3 


Cambridge — Con. 
Cambridge and Somerville Gemelath Chesed 

Charitable Loan Association 
Cambridge Anti-Tuberculosis Association 8 . 
Cambridge Community Center, Inc. 7 . 


$3,750 27 


- 


$858 22 


$6,887 50 


4 


Cambridge Hebrew Women's Aid Society 


544 96 


_3 


2,515 70 


225 00 


5 


Cambridge Homes for Aged People 


485,317 86 


" 


3,693 00 


3,792 87 


6 


Cambridge Hospital (150 beds) . 


1,134,255 01 


" 


2,881 70 


155,863 62 


7 


Cambridge Neighborhood House, Inc. . 


33,897 16 


11,319 47 


5,041 06 


3,418 82 


8 
9 


Cambridgeport Fruit and Flower Mission 
Cambridge Rotary Educational Fund Inc. . 


1,371 51 

1,020 99 


- 


369 42 
337 00 


125 00 


10 


Cambridge Tuberculosis Association 


6,084 85 


- 


4,315 64 


10,887 67 


11 
12 
13 
14 


Cambridge Visiting Nursing Association, The 
Cambridge Welfare Union .... 
Cambridge Young Men's Christian Association 1 
Cambridge Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion ....... 


67,103 00 
43,528 64 

234,350 89 


- 


10,366 17 
22,580 62 

28,271 11 


16,356 12 
966 63 

51,682 53 


15 
16 
17 


Columbus Day Nursery of Cambridge 

East End Union of Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Harvard Legal Aid Bureau .... 


38,992 48 

48,427 64 

284 10 


14,400 00 
15,000 00 


2,573 40 

6,273 85 

572 50 


86 12 
1,359 83 


18 


Holy Ghost Hospital for Incurables (215 beds) 


7C 9,731 98 


- 


24,623 76 


119,418 12 


19 
20 

21 
22 

23 


Howard Benevolent Society of Cambridge 9 . 
Middlesex Charitable Infirmaries, Inc. (100 

beds) ....... 

Tide Over League, Inc. 

United Pentecostal Council of the Assemblies 

of God, Inc. ...... 

Wesley Foundation at Harvard University, The 


8,622 05 

135,422 82 
31 27 

39 50 


§2,800 00 


1,271 50 
5,095 00 

1,215 11 
3,000 00 


55,451 64 

4,261 68 


24 
25 


Canton 
Canton Hospital and Nursing Association 
Canton Playground Association . 


5,707 27 
19,054 76 


- 


2,516 19 
50 00 


11,800 18 


26 


Chatham 
Chatham Visiting Nurse Association, Incor- 
porated ...... 


1,669 50 


_ 


1,854 70 


372 45 


27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


Chelsea 
Chelsea Day Nursery and Children's Home . 
Chelsea Hebrew Charitable Loan Association 
Chelsea Hebrew Sheltering Home 
Chelsea Memorial Hospital (105 beds) _ _ . 
Chelsea Memorial Hospital Aid Association, 
Inc. ....... 


46,093 97 
5,135 10 

4,556 94 
204,271 88 

3 8 84 


50,750 00 


1,298 40 

1,250 00 

510 98 

170 00 

1,665 14 


4,413 45 
13,795 00 

123,349 89 

349 08 


32 


Chelsea Young Men's Christian Association 


150,000 00 


19,500 00 


7,743 05 


4,224 55 


33 


Chevra Bikur Cholim of Chelsea . 


25 06 


- 


1,408 92 


- 


34 
35 

36 
37 
38 


Chevra Kadisha of Chelsea 
Chevra Thilim and Gemilath Chesed Associa- 
tion, Inc., of Chelsea .... 
Hebrew Free Loan Association of Chelsea 
Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Association 
Old Ladies' Home Association of Chelsea 


18,503 18 

597 00 

7,254 93 

1,291 16 

77,767 58 


- 


482 00 

922 02 

876 25 

8,504 16 

1,275 88 


4.795 96 

19,264 29 
600 00 


39 


Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Trustees of 


739,076 53 


- 


248,915 00 


1,815 47 


40 
41 

42 


Clinton 
Clinton District Nursing Association, Inc. 
Clinton Home for Aged People 
Clinton Hospital Association (85 beds) 


2,541 17 
121,762 52 
383,544 58 


_3 


342 83 

1,059 70 

11,080 16 


3,440 20 

389 30 

49,612 61 


43 


Clinton-Lancaster Tuberculosis Association . 


6,654 59 


" 


96 64 


851 23 


44 
45 
46 
47 


Cohasset 
Beechwood Improvement Association, Inc. . 
Bonnie Bairns Association .... 
Cohasset Horse Show Association, Inc. 
Sandy Beach Association .... 


2,500 49 

244 34 

4,929 35 

32,487 38 


1,150 00 


16 50 
4,425 00 


85 61 

5,125 93 
2,177 81 



None. 



No report. 



8 Name changed to Cambridge Tuberculosis Association. 



Organizations aided, 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



89 



Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditure; 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



$5,450 00 

14 45 
300 00 



850 00 



1,000 004 
3,700 00 



1,100 00 



7,500 00 4 
27,189 94 



100 00 



1,000 00 
236 09 



1,800 00 



100 00 



$7,754 48 

2,740 70 
33,008 58 
196,518 61 

8,471 00 

439 70 
510 49 

15,481 10 

28,589 25 
25,813 53 

88,301 65 

3,963 25 

9,536 24 

572 50 

166,888 05 

359 05 

55,698 49 
9,356 68 

1,215 11 
3,688 00 



4,565 67 
1,023 80 



2,250 48 



7,394 30 
15,045 00 
510 98 
124,846 57 

2,076 65 

20,792 92 

1,408 92 
5,898 46 

922 02 

20,140 54 

8,554 16 

6.d98 24 

258,037 35 



3,857 97 

7,116 25 

73,034 91 

1,389 64 



229 58 

9,564 54 
2,533 41 



$8,499 95 

2,521 35 

30,904 04 
186,745 75 

9,065 40 

461 01 
740 00 

15,628 22 
23,984 63 
26,578 65 

81,204 00 

4,480 96 

9,631 90 

614 35 

128,841 96 



53,822 81 
9,507 88 



1,215 11 
4,078 50 



4,432 03 
681 06 



2,418 62 



7,013 27 

14,885 65 

295 14 

122,825 23 

2,059 44 

19,793 12 

1,649 78 
4,747 17 

666 02 

20,028 48 

8,463 75 

3,917 54 

273,161 61 



2,850 08 

7,067 90 

60,902 17 

1,206 79 



346 62 

4,728 36 
1,711 63 



$8 00 



9,622 80 
73,077 66 
5,404 61 

6,261 92 

13,969 16 
10,252 06 

39,727 98 

1,058 00 
6,740 04 

35,132 84 



27,649 71 
3,459 00 



2,625 69 
448 00 



1,565 00 



3,019 33 

200 00 

25 00 

43,523 38 



10,187 59 

401 04 
216 00 



250 00 

1,050 00 

1,525 00 

104,004 78 



2,772 75 

2,216 75 

25,883 88 



60 00 
1,011 50 



li 
3 
3 1 

155 



154 

52 
4 
53 

7,478 

32 

1,890 

170 

1 

22 
32 
4,525 



2,417 
560 
212 

425 



2,233 
521 



40 

450 

454 

3,407 

12 

_3 
152 

458 
500 



70 
410 



1,013 



3,777 
13 

1,792 
3> 
18 



6 
5,591 



154 



895 

1,400 
170 

32 

1,803 
48 



Mil 



901 
521 



274 



454 
348 



100 
500 



410 



1,013 



50 



4 Restricted to capital. 



' Paid officers. » Attendance. 



Report not due. 9 Report for 7 months. 



90 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Concord 
Concord Female Charitable Society- 
Concord's Home for the Aged 
Emerson Hospital in Concord 1 (49 beds) 
Women's Parish Association 

Dalton 

Berkshire Animal Rescue League 
W. Murray Crane Community House, Trus- 
tees of . . . . 
Young Men's Christian Association of Dalton 
Zenas Crane Fund for Student Aid Inc. 

Danvers 
Danvers Home for the Aged 
Danvers Visiting Nurse Association 
New England Home for Deaf Mutes (Aged 
Blind or Infirm) ..... 

Putnam Home Inc~, The .... 

Robert A. MacFadden Educational Fund, Inc. 

Dedham 
Dedham Community Association, Inc. 
Dedham Emergency Nursing Association 

Dedham Temporary Home for Women and 

Children 

Social Service Board of Dedham, Inc., The . 

DtjXbuRY 
Duxbury Nurse Association, Inc., The 



Easthampton 
Helping Hand Society .... 

Easton 
Eastondale Community Club 

Everett 
Church Home Association, The . 

Everett Cottage Hospital (54 beds) 
Everett Home for Aged Persons . 
Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Everett . 
Mutual Help Association of the People of 



Monaster: 
The 



The Birthday of Virgin Mary, 



Fairhaven _ 
Fairhaven Benevolent Association 
Fairhaven King's Daughters Home for the 
Aged, Inc. ...... 

Ladies' Benevolent Society, The . 

Fall River 

Achnosas Orchim, Inc. l 

Animal Rescue League of Fall River 

Associacao de Carridade do Ispirito Santo da 
Santissima Trinidade .... 

Association for Community Welfare in Fall 
River * . 

Bishop Stang Day Nursery 

Boys' Club of Fall River 

Children's Home of Fall River 

District Nursing Association of Fall River . 

East End Hebrew Gemilath Chassodim Asso- 
ciation of Fall River i 

Fall River Anti-Tuberculosis Society . 

Fall River Deaconess Home 

Fall River Hebrew Women's Charitable Insti- 
tution ....... 

Fall River High School Alumni Scholarships, 
Trustees of .... 



$14,383 68 
85,585 04 



6,077 18 



43,135 66 



270,522 04 
103,014 95 
101,516 70 


79,892 10 
5,836 46 


161,139 47 


49,467 94 


1,364 72 


42,235 14 


30,680 12 


73,286 31 
1,120 60 



2,294 83 

18,793 34 
2,041 38 

8,603 01 

4,053 86 
37,315 94 

675 99 

556 58 

56,196 53 

5,476 16 
1,328 13 

80,561 17 
1,542 68 



50,328 15 
484,266 22 
317,996 01 

68,984 86 



10,924 62 
116,000 00 



61,292 59 



57,000 00 



4,000 00 



4,000 00 



:541 00 
73 00 



1,432 71 



357 92 



1,936 29 
3,243 85 
4,550 00 


872 00 
3,952 30 


16,532 08 


100 00 


12,155 00 


4,663 75 


5,148 52 
3,401 79 



1,564 70 

5,200 07 
40 90 



1,802 00 

1,151 79 

4,267 00 

262 55 



61 00 

1,174 37 
18 50 



217 38 


4,587 40 

295 00 

12,092 33 


15 00 


5,100 74 


300 00 


175 73 



None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



91 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$705 12 
4,018 54 


$1,000 00 
3,750 00 


$2,254 12 
8,041 54 


$1,332 06 
4,109 22 


$1,487 40 


2 


30 
6 


6 


19 


i 

2 
3 


1,027 79 


- 


2,379 12 


1,306 18 


- 


- 


302 


- 


- 


4 


865 00 


- 


2,120 67 


2,119 33 


1,440 00 


1 


_3 


_3 


_3 


5 


6,168 54 
4,317 11 
5,063 12 


: 


8,104 83 
8,206 99 
9,763 12 


7,224 82 
8,485 36 
9,864 92 


4,426 01 


5 


12 

_3 

25 


14 


_3 


6 

7 
8 


3,783 47 
262 54 


- 


9,467 57 
4,214 84 


5,961 71 
4,618 75 


1,917 38 
2,667 73 


2 
1 


9 
400 


9 

72 


" 


9 
10 


4,298 84 


20,000 00 4 


18,871 50 


19,175 92 


7,944 69 


8 


26 


3 


- 


11 


2,458 47 


- 


3,731 61 


3,508 09 


1,480 50 


{ r 


} 45 


2 


- 


12 


36 72 


- 


906 72 


200 00 


- 


3 


- 


- 


13 


233 00 


m 


71,318 88 


70,804 59 


3,194 40 


18 


_3 


_3 


_3 


14 


4,844 12 


- 


13,349 61 


11,402 30 


5,494 74 


8 


f 7 = 
1 1,403 


} 829 


50 


15 


6,876 05 
7 68 


~ 


23,413 25 
3,409 47 


24,856 88 
3,908 37 


9,693 22 
1,300 00 


11 


538 

_s 


1 

_3 


125 


16 
17 


118 48 


- 


2,197 04 


2,426 12 


1,395 59 


1 


/ 32 

\ 394 


} 318 


_3 


18 


683 19 


- 


6,199 46 


5,079 85 


2,148 49 


2 


- 


- 


50 


19 


14 49 


- 


55 39 


60 56 


- 


- 


22 


- 


- 


20 


325 00 


- 


2,127 20 


1,764 19 


890 00 


1 


/ 42 

I 5 


} * 

28 


2 


21 


142 22 
2,129 93 


2,500 00 


52,750 40 
7,009 93 


48,696 54 
2,714 67 


18,358 88 
1,059 41 


18 
1 


1,620 
6 


: 


22 
23 




- 


810 41 


870 93 


- 


- 


/ 32 

\ 44 


} -"■ 


9 


24 


- 


- 


- 


141 88 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


25 


4,147 83 


- 


4,227 83 


3,715 91 


240 00 


15 


12 


_ 


_3 


26 


255 42 


- 


3,429 29 


3,249 30 


1,080 00 


1 


7 


_3 


_3 


27 


5 12 


~ 


265 09 


216 20 


- 


~ 


/ 22 

1 12 


} « 


2 


28 


7,229 34 


50,000 00 


60,655 69 


4,460 73 


2,979 00 


2 


5,2776 


2,877 6 


_ 


29 
30 


- 


165 00 


382 38 


339 70 


10 00 


1 


12 


- 


" 


31 


478 43 
12,344 60 
13,020 60 
5,281 54 


2,000 004 
4,600 004 


2,708 68 
25,567 65 
16,283 49 

57,143 97 


3,584 03 
25,594 89 
16,949 28 
57,723 58 


850 00 

13,651 50 

7,725 20 

46,454 56 


2 

8 

11 

30 


200 

2,808 

58 

6,009 


15 

_3 

34 
445 


_3 
_3 
_3 


32 
33 
34 

35 
36 


53 69 


- 


4,476 37 


4,080 15 


220 00 


2 


28 


28 


_ 


37 
38 


6,793 39 


9,000 004 


14,900 11 


15,546 58 


6,661 93 


10 


t 52 

\ 985 


} 793 


-3 


39 


- 


- 


300 00 


300 00 


- 


- 


100 


100 


- 


40 


7,018 96 


- 


7,194 69 


4,687 00 


- 


- 


18 


18 


- 


41 



« Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



6 Animals. 



92 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

6 

7 


Fall River — Con. 
Fall River Jewish Home for the Aged, Inc. . 
Fall River Women's Union 
Franciscan Missionaries of Mary of Fall River 
Hebrew Free School Society \ 
Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association 1 
Hebrew Ladies' Beneficial Fund, Inc. 1 
Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society of Fall 
River i . . 


J 14,000 00 

153,738 37 

18,454 01 


* 1,500 00 


$6,202 55 
9,830 00 
3,487 02 


$4,109 05 
3,156 27 


8 


Home for Aged People in Fall River 


489,056 79 


- 


129 20 


765 19 


9 
10 
11 


Mt. Lebanon Society . 

St. Anne's Hospital Corporation (110 beds) . 

St. Joseph's Orphanage .... 


8,500 00 
124,852 25 
500,961 36 


8,300 00 
7,000 00 


1,325 00 
1,668 00 
9,922 15 


50,201 12 
53,941 63 


12 


St. Vincent's Home Corporation of Fall River 


205,545 26 


- 


20,604 04 


11,255 59 


13 
14 
15 

16 


Truesdale Hospital, Inc., The (125 beds) 
Union Hospital in Fall River, The (150 beds) . 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union of 

Fall River 

Young Men's Christian Association of Fall 

River ....... 


825,566 50 
652,388 68 

12,128 11 

321,000 00 


84,900 00 


50,873 95 

422 81 

8,362 40 


142,128 96 
112,328 51 

4 74 

30,443 94 


17 
18 


Falmouth 
Falmouth Nursing Association, Incorporated 
Lawrence High School Scholarship Associa- 
tion, Inc., of Falmouth, Mass., The . 


26,731 29 
2,280 52 


- 


1,557 22 
332 00 


8,445 49 


19 


FlTCHBTJRO 

Burbank Hospital (200 beds) 


1,022,221 47 


_ 


3,332 85 


156,606 02 


20 


Family Welfare Association of Fitchburg 


17,083 60 


- 


7,617 12 


291 01 


21 


Fitchburg Helping Hand Association . 


69,780 03 


- 


78 00 


16,228 52 


22 


Fitchburg Home for Old Ladies . 


207,000 74 


- 


29,596 85 


2,610 00 


23 

24 

25 


New England French American Home . 
Northern Worcester County Public Health 
Association, Inc. ..... 

Visiting Nursing Association of Fitchburg, The 


13,542 30 

1,991 07 
23,874 32 


4,500 00 


993 29 

10,8 08 
7,335 88 


660 50 

200 00 
6,854 31 


26 


Wachusett Children's Aid Society 


52,896 68 


- 


4,548 58 


8,565 21 


27 


Young Men's Christian Association of Fitch- 
burg ....... 


196,103 02 


39,930 40 


20,239 98 


5,764 23 


28 


FoXBOROUOH 

Doolittle Universalist Home for Aged Persons, 
Inc. ....... 


58,963 16 




5,780 75 


400 00 


29 


E. E. Knapp Camp Association, Inc., The . 
Framinoham 


750 00 


~ 


13 23 


" 


30 


Christian Workers Union 8 . 


33,839 44 


7,040 00 


5,970 76 


9,731 33 


31 


Framingham Civic League, Inc. . 


165,671 89 


15,395 00 


2,819 00 


2,144 91 


32 
33 

34 

35 


Framingham Hospital (75 beds) . 

Framingham Union Hospital, Inc., The 

Home for Aged Men and Women in Framing- 
ham ....... 

Southwestern Middlesex Public Health Asso- 
ciation, Inc. ...... 


140,641 56 
382,768 01 

84,035 83 

8,783 23 


-3 

148,000 00 

_3 

2,100 00 


3,677 36 
99,897 70 

1,602 50 

1,076 07 


80,285 29 

3,160 45 
4,994 64 


36 
37 


Union Avenue Hospital Inc. (70 beds) 
Union Avenue Hospital Nurses' Alumnae 
Association, Inc. 1 . 








51,085 57 


38 


Franklin 
Frances Eddy King Student Fund, Inc., The 


136 33 


_3 


176 50 


_ 


39 


Young Men's Christian Association of Franklin 


33,366 14 


9,450 00 


3,267 33 


1,410 79 


40 
41 


Gardner 
Gardner Home for Elderly People 
Henry Heywood Memorial Hospital, The (96 
beds) ....... 

Georgetown 


72,795 20 
1,250,530 35 


- 


12,000 00 


4,080 73 
75,028 41 


42 


Carleton Home, Trustees of the . 


41,156 25 


- 


12 68 


- 



- None. 1 No report. 2 Organizations aided. 

6 Name changed to Russian and Eastern European Mission. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



93 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Familie. 
aided ex- 
clusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$200 00 



22,500 00 4 



1,000 00 
5,000 00 4 
2,500 00 

1,000 00 4 



3,171 79 



3,171 79 



5,000 00 



29,601 18 
22,850 00 



9,976 65 
1,098 36< 



$6,402 55 

17,717 04 

6,674 09 


25,183 40 


1,560 00 
54,535 78 
67,720 57 


34,418 48 


143,103 88 
177,587 57 


828 82 


38,806 34 


10,002 71 


416 42 


173,680 55 


8,763 00 


16,306 52 


47,046 32 


1,818 79 


10,088 08 
15,288 86 


18,455 48 


34,140 52 


13,331 93 



13,331 93 


13 45 


16,563 96 


11,946 88 


90,024 51 
104,788 90 


29,188 11 


6,086 97 


51,147 34 


180 38 


6,815 28 


20,882 11 


122,555 95 


2,277 13 



$5,968 15 
10,490 98 
5,789 24 



24,305 70 

1,102 00 

67,087 21 

63,302 46 

41,147 07 

154,367 22 

184,440 29 

1,090 83 

40,268 25 



8,882 27 
542 52 

173,698 02 
10,057 40 
17,161 93 
10,140 17 
2,543 73 

10,145 75 
14,298 63 

22,117 77 
34,890 96 



5,110 15 
24 60 



15,632 81 

13,190 44 

100,244 76 
6,703 57 

11,342 11 

4,227 87 
46,730 48 



44 05 
7,053 04 



5,845 66 
118,360 32 



2,373 27 



$1,504 40 
5,385 00 



10,512 09 

60 00 

23,479 63 

10,723 32 

6,265 00 

68,078 11 

80,469 59 



719 



6,422 43 



75,283 82 
2,992 00 
5,493 00 
4,567 75 
700 00 

2,692 00 
12,034 32 

5,817 88 
16,802 15 



3,040 04 



1,806 14 

6,843 94 
40,742 09 

3,659 00 

458 60 
19,073 08 



3,898 56 



1,457 20 
57,832 19 



1,053 74 



10 



11 

836 



2 

1,564 

827 

150 

2,398 
5,305 



341 



4,792 

514 
18 
50 

106 
3,380 
252 
142 



630 



22 

1 
402 

-3 

2,518 



152 

23 

1,780 



8 
1,824 



10 


_ 


836 


350 


29 




_3 

219 
195 


-3 
- 


108 


_3 


125 

430 




-3 


45 


57 




22 




_3 




1,322 


_ 


- 


228 


18 




24 


_3 


101 

867 


" 


24 


62 



53 



46 



4 Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



94 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 


Incum- 
brances on 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 
and 






reported 


Real Estate 


Refunds 




Gloucester 










1 


Addison Gilbert Hospital (50 beds) 


£545,228 46 


- 


£500 00 


$53,318 09 


2 


Annisquam Association, Inc. 


11,101 68 


- 


536 02 


127 90 


3 


Associated Charities of Gloucester 


26,012 25 


- 


382 40 


16 50 


4 


Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons 


98,689 79 


- 


- 


490 20 


5 


Gloucester District Nursing Association 


10,908 98 


-3 


2,178 99 


4,210 10 


6 


Gloucester Female Charitable Association 


72,893 74 


- 


17 00 


- 


7 


Gloucester Fishermen's Institute 


120,315 32 


- 


2,957 50 


8,423 12 


8 


Gloucester Fishermen's and Seamen's Widows' 












and Orphans' Aid Society 


75,595 37 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Gloucester Hebrew Ladies'Aid Association, Inc. 


834 13 


- 


328 43 


100 38 


10 


Huntress Home ..... 


59,197 38 


- 


4,000 00 


35 


11 


Women's Clubhouse Association of Magnolia 


7,759 37 


- 


1,052 25 


- 


12 


Young Men's Christian Association of Glouces- 












ter 


176,458 09 


116,810 00 


17,485 65 


13,372 15 




Great Barrinoton 










13 


Fairview Hospital (20 beds) 


230,576 92 


- 


86,422 78 


17,011 91 


14 


Visiting Nurse Association of Great Barring- 












ton, The 


24,824 05 


~ 


6,847 73 


3,160 38 




Greenfield 










15 


Franklin County Public Hospital (100 beds) 


382,697 64 


7,000 00 


22,505 19 


68,505 79 


16 


Girls' Club of Greenfield, Massachusetts 


2,056 29 


_3 


1,421 52 


486 21 


17 


Greenfield Health Camp, Inc. 


4,965 84 


- 


2,037 50 


- 


18 


Greenfield Society for the Protection of Ani- 












mals ....... 


1,361 57 


- 


46 00 


- 


19 


Greenfield Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., The 


9,706 36 


- 


2,019 40 


6,655 71 


20 


Home for the Aged People of Franklin County 
Hamilton 


105 98 




30 00 




21 


Community Service of Hamilton and Wenham, 












Incorporated ...... 


1,790 26 


— 


2,481 90 


" 




Hanson 










22 


Massachusetts Branch of the International 
Order of the King's Daughters and Sons 












(Gordon Rest) ..... 


21,272 52 


— 


1,091 31 


2,787 53 




Harwich 










23 


Harwich Visiting Nurse Association Incorpo- 
rated ....... 

Haverhill 


1,685 49 


- 


1,493 30 


529 34 


24 


Animal Rescue League of Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, Inc., The 1 










25 


Citizens' Firemen's Relief Fund of Haverhill, 












Inc. ....... 


9,012 14 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Esodia Thetokou Scalohoriton Lesvou, Inc. 


3,361 78 


- 


739 59 


- 


27 




7,610 53 


~ 


3,304 76 


105 79 


28 


General Gale Hospital Aid Association 


1,385 43 


~ 


227 78 


29 02 


29 


Hale Hospital (123 beds) .... 


348,948 89 


- 


7,131 51 


82,678 38 


30 


Haverhill Boys' Club Association 


120,381 69 


1,200 00 


4,111 65 


878 86 


31 


Haverhill Children's Aid Society 


126,192 63 


- 


836 60 


1,303 30 


32 


Haverhill College Club, (Incorporated) 


1,868 89 


- 


426 00 


95 00 


33 


Haverhill Day Nursery Association 


34,111 43 


- 


1,813 60 


1,389 50 


34 


Haverhill Female Benevolent Society . 


119,040 79 


- 


40 00 


- 


35 


Haverhill Hebrew Sheltering Home, Inc. 7 . 










36 


Haverhill Master House Painters and Decora- 












tors Association ..... 


88 34 


- 


128 00 


120 00 


37 


Haverhill Teachers' Association, Incorporated 


2,528 24 


- 


810 00 


983 09 


38 


Haverhill Union Mission, Inc. 


13,621 89 


- 


659 71 


56 67 


39 


Haverhill Young Men's Christian Aszociation 


69,272 88 


6,470 00 


12,844 57 


12,790 64 


40 


Haverhill Young Women's Christian Associa- 












tion ....... 


31,126 39 


- 


3,135 72 


3,032 45 


41 


Linwood O. Towne Scholarship Association, 












Inc., The 


2,304 67 


- 


24 00 


632 72 


42 


Mary F. Ames Convalescent Home Inc., The 


116,326 31 


- 


~ 


~ 



- None. 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



95 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 




Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$19,109 67 
1,542 56 


$15,000 OO^ 


$73,859 96 
2,206 48 


$74,586 81 
1,604 00 


$36,555 03 
425 00 




27 
3 




2,014 


169 


- 


1 

2 


1,033 42 


- 


1,432 32 


1,433 07 


562 12 


{ 


l 6 
1 


J 


- 


- 


185 


3 


4,853 14 


- 


5,343 34 


5,116 15 


2,262 88 


j 

I 


2^ 
3 


} 


8 


} « 


- 


4 


371 05 


- 


6,760 14 


6,109 41 


4,983 98 




4 


{ 


12 

53 


568 


5 


2,897 21 


1,000 00 4 


2,941 21 


2,930 75 


325 00 


/ 
I 


16 

1 


} 


_3 


-3 


55 


6 


3,531 29 


9,448 00 


24,397 19 


13,439 27 


6,512 50 


4 




100.000 6 


_3 


_3 


7 


4,196 77 
37 47 


: 


4,196 77 
466 28 


3,548 49 
674 11 


250 00 




_3 




- 


~ 


107 

_3 


8 
9 


2,309 81 


- 


6,310 16 


5,820 83 


2,301 90 


{ 


IB 

3 


} 


7 


7 


- 


10 


- 


- 


1,052 25 


1,079 79 


406 00 


2 


114 


12 


" 


11 


3,747 70 


7,992 00^ 


34,605 50 


32,354 58 


17,037 24 




13 


{ 


402 
6,500 


} 3,500 


" 


12 


6,693 05 


500 00 4 


25,825 96 


20,019 07 


10,687 84 




14 




660 


107 


- 


13 


50 29 


- 


10,058 40 


11,524 23 


7 670 34 




5 




672 


364 


487 


14 


4,245 39 
20 69 
13 64 


- 


97,024 53 
1,928 42 
2,051 14 


106,095 80 
4,997 11 
2,205 77 


38,164 22 

2,107 60 

918 00 




36 
18 
8 




1,286 
300 
112 


50 
112 


_3 


15 

16 

17 


57 62 

358 52 


100 00 


103 62 

9,033 63 

130 00 


84 95 

7,892 71 

24 02 


6,525 02 




4 




1,150 


96 


_3 


18 
19 
20 


201 33 


- 


2,968 64 


2,855 01 


1,860 00 




2 


{ 


312 

2,000 


} 1,000 


- 


21 


129 29 


79 29 


4,117 74 


3,713 17 


1,075 20 


I 


25 

8 




32 

175 


} « 


_3 


22 


78 51 


- 


2,101 15 


2,358 40 


1,774 29 




1 


{ 


12 

154 


} 20 


90 


23 


428 17 
241 60 
307 90 


3,000 00 


428 17 

981 19 

6,798 41 


475 00 
12,839 97 
4,575 54 


2,374 00 




2 




8 


- 


230 


24 

25 

26 
27 


58 19 


- 


314 99 


356 88 


- 




- 


{ 


12 

50 


} L 


3 


28 


4,026 27 
2,926 56 


/ 12,000 OO^ 

\ 16,500 00 

3,700 00 


} 110,336 16 
11,619 13 


114,521 68 
8,605 69 


47,610 68 
6,036 00 




49 

7 




1,317 
1,200 


22 


_3 


29 
30 


5,718 29 


- 


7,858 79 


7,873 31 


1,618 31 


{ 


l 5 
2 


} 


331 


325 


42 


31 


69 19 
1,281 19 


- 


590 19 
4,498 99 


259 52 
3,725 79 


2,006 95 


4 




1 
98 


5 


72 


32 
33 


5,669 85 


- 


5,709 85 


4,649 26 


750 00 


{ 


35 
1 


} 


21 


21 


82 


34 
35 

36 

37 
38 


92 00 

79 17 

3,785 55 


- 


340 00 
1,872 26 
4,501 93 


257 79 
1,625 10 
4,717 53 


1,348 00 




3 




1 
88 


1 
26 


80 


566 26 


- 


21,201 47 


21,445 73 


11,841 56 


{ 


25 

10 




10 2 
1.079 


J 158 


1 


39 


3,499 87 


/ 5,000 004 
\ 540 00 


\ 10,208 04 


8,418 32 


5,427 14 




5 




1,976 


1,020 


- 


40 


113 98 
4,500 41 


- 


770 70 
4,500 41 


17 04 

2,278 42 


250 00 




15 




- 


- 


- 


41 
42 



* Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



6 Attendance. 



7 Report not due, 



96 



P.D. 17: 

Abstracts of Reports of Privatii 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Haverhill — Con. 
Massachusetts Phythian Sisters' Home Asso- 
ciation ....... 

Old Ladies' Home Association 

Progressive Society of Kalloniaton Arisbe, The ; 
Sarah A. White Home for Aged Men, The . 
Social Circle of Portland Street Church 

HiNGHAM 

Hingham Memorial Hospital, Inc. 
Hingham Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

H OLDEN 

Holden District Hospital, Incorporated (26 
beds) ....... 

HOLYOKE 

Holyoke Boys' Club Association . 
Holyoke Community Field, Inc. 1 

Holyoke Day Nursery, Inc. 

Holyoke Family Welfare Society, Inc. . 

Holyoke Hebrew Free Loan Society 

Holyoke Home for Aged People . 
Holyoke Home Information Centre, Inc. 
Holyoke Hospital (150 beds) 

Holyoke Junior Achievement Foundation, Inc 

Holyoke Society for the Care of Crippled 

Children, Inc. ..... 

Holyoke Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 6 
Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association. 
Sisters of Providence (Beaven-Kelly Home) . 
Sisters of Providence (Bright-side Orphans' 

and Bethlehem Homes) .... 
Sisters of Providence (House of Providence 

Hospital and Father Harkins' Home for 

Aged Women) (140 beds) 
Sisters of Providence (Mt. St. Vincent Home 

for Girls) 

Skinner Coffee House, Incorporated 

United Hebrew Charities of Holyoke, Inc. . 

White Cross Association for Graduate Nurses 
of Holyoke, Mass. ..... 

Young Women's Christian Association of 
Holyoke ...... 

HOPEDALE 

Hopedale Community House, Inc. 

Hull 
Father Andrew O'Brien Memorial Association, 
Inc., of Hull 

Ipswich 
Coburn Charitable Society (Home for the 
Aged) 

Coburn Charitable Society (Visiting Nurse 
Dept.) 

Ipswich Hospital (operating Benjamin Stick- 
ney Cable Memorial Hospital) (25 beds) 

Lancaster 
Charitable Fund in the Town of Lancaster, 

Trustees of 
Lancaster Social Service Association 
Nathaniel Thayer Playground Association . 

Lawrence 
Asrath Noshim ...... 

Cardinal Gibbons Club 

German Old Folks Home of Lawrence, Massa- 
chusetts ...... 



536,238 29 


228,833 87 


122,301 13 
216 33 


1,282 87 
1,345 43 


66,758 75 


126,044 96 


64,205 30 


862 18 


2,920 85 


211,445 91 


1,569 09 


613,243 70 


188 21 


_3 

135 47 

425,175 46 

70,084 61 


176,005 94 


290,598 71 


77,427 04 
16., 693 96 


483 05 


2,993 41 


111,969 95 


206,995 72 


2,345 37 


222,001 31 


207,161 10 


13,384 51 

20,622 85 
41 62 


1,049 80 
811 68 


42,881 31 



?8,000 00 



24,000 00 

10,150 00 
11,000 00 



85,000 00 



3,600 00 



5-2,830 79 
1,093 00 

50 95 

1,600 60 

6,095 38 
9,450 25 

14,663 19 
1,439 53 

1,936 31 

8,391 50 

38,397 09 

9,542 51 



7,588 75 

36,173 42 

243 08 

8,057 27 



155 00 

8,001 83 
14,650 00 

1,280 28 



13,029 21 
5,817 65 

473 30 



217 95 

20,566 20 



1,518 54 
1,682 69 



675 00 
1,257 75 

772 60 



- None. * No report. 2 Organizations aided. 

Reported under Coburn Charitable Society (Home for the Aged) , 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 



97 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 














Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$1,089 06 




$6,266 30 


$3,391 24 


$1,035 34 


1 


5 


_3 




1 


10,274 55 


/ $5,000 00 4 
1 7,887 50 


} 21,311 75 


15,021 33 


6,750 07 


{ J' 


} 26 


22 


- 


2 


6,453 92 


- 


6,453 92 
526 63 


537 75 
403 15 


300 00 


26 


62 


- 


_3 


3 
4 
5 


45 65 


" 


3,164 72 


3,409 36 


1,892 00 


1 


313 


30 


_ 


6 

7 


927 21 


354 79 


35,716 71 


36,628 82 


11,485 85 


10 


695 


28 


- 


8 


700 13 


- 


11,171 01 


11,258 34 


7,965 25 


13 


- 


- 


- 


9 

10 


- 


15.050 00 


16,229 43 


16,576 13 


5,258 55 


15 


/ 52 
\ 1,959 
1,714 


} 1,639 
1,714 


339 


11 


- 


- 


14,832 95 


14,026 57 


5,340 00 


4 


-3 


12 


- 


- 


7,439 53 


7,792 81 


75 00 


15 


f 12 

1 38 


} 38 


-3 


13 


7,193 73 


/ 5,500 00^ 
\ 5,041 00 


} 16,041 15 


17,593 50 


5,631 98 


7 


25 


25 


- 


14 


38 51 


9,051 01 


9,400 87 


7,886 43 


8 


1,357 


1,357 


_3 


15 


15,074 11 


/ 15,000 00 4 
\ 1,100 00 


1 153,912 91 


152,499 66 


64,148 40 


63 


3,871 


256 


- 


16 


3 50 


- 


9,503 50 


9,495 47 


7,882 70 


4 


/ 72 

I 758 


} - 


" 


17 


4,003 84 

19,940 26 
193 42 


; 


4,510 58 
16,731 87 
67,055 35 
21,244 02 


4,700 66 
16,636 04 
67,970 62 
24,838 58 


1,100 00 
14,620 20 
27,354 08 

1,821 10 


1 
9 
15 

7 


254 

2,627 

7,159 

89 


189 

1,172 

5,432 

4 


~ 


18 
19 
20 
21 


33 50 


5,184 77 


48,905 29 


45,628 84 


6,568 35 


18 


327 


14 


~ 


22 


216 46 


1,200 00 


117,662 50 


116,418 63 


32,285 95 


54 


4,500 


419 


- 


23 


91 74 
811 37 


2,000 00 
100,000 00 


31,875 50 
116,009 08 


34,521 62 
16,397 87 


6,214 66 
8,901 31 


9 
16 


186 
4,112 


5 

677 


, 


24 
25 


- 


- 


1,280 28 


1,121 34 


- 


- 


{ # 


} - 


3 


26 


135 46 


- 


158 46 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27 


931 76 


- 


30,019 87 


30,247 54 


12,946 65 


{ r 


} 1,700 


_3 


- 


23 


11,511 40 


- 


17,360 67 


13,172 00 


7,928 01 


{ v 


} - 


_3 


_s 


29 


40 66 


- 


513 96 


284 70 


- 


- 


/ 12 

\ 50 


} 50 


1 


30 


11,750 95 


8,000 00 * 


12,822 04 


13,773 92 


3,862 55 


{ v 


} • 


9 


- 


31 


_7 


_7 


-7 


-7 


-7 


-i 


-i 


-• 


-" 


32 


4,094 03 


500 00 


40,939 25 


39,494 61 


15,146 45 


ii 


573 


126 


- 


33 


626 19 
1,136 26 


- 


626 19 
3,569 00 
1,966 44 


581 50 
2,966 13 
1,979 09 


2,034 00 
956 00 


i 

4 


11 
270 
439 


160 
250 


= 


34 
35 
36 


41 67 


: 


1,466 65 
1,257 75 


1,641 65 

548 09 


- 


- 


286 


-3 


: 


37 
3S 


1,329 75 


1,000 00 


9,660 24 


5,686 53 


1,785 44 


{ I' 


1 20 


- 


- 39 



4 Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



6 Report for 11 months. 



98 










P.D. 17 






Abstracts of Report 


s of Privatt\ 






Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 

1 


l 


Lawkence — Con. 
Hebrew Ladies Council Progressive Associa- 
tion l ...... 










2 


Incorporated Protectory of Mary Immaculate 


$133,557 82 


- 


§2,651 30 


532,373 32 


3 


International Association of Y's Men's Clubs, 
The 


_ 


_ 


60 00 


10,760 04 


4 


Lawrence Boys' Club ..... 


73,183 71 


- 


11,899 82 


756 28 


5 


Lawrence City Mission .... 


12,577 96 


SL600 00 


14,012 56 


1,786 08 


6 


Lawrence General Hospital (147 beds) 


674,198 38 


- 


23,108 56 


103,753 34 


7 


Lawrence Home for Aged People 


461,367 32 


- 


4,299 26 


3,812 03 


8 


Lawrence Tuberculosis League, Inc. 


24,414 83 


10,750 00 


4,176 00 


7,734 90 


9 


Lawrence Young Men's Christian Association 


233,037 63 


10,900 00 


20,387 09 


37,523 66 : 


10 

11 
12 
13 

14 
15 


Lawrence Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion ....... 

Patriotic Society of Habossi, Incorporated 
Russell-Hood Trust, Incorporated x 
St. John the Baptist Orthodox Greek Catho- 
lic Church of Lawrence .... 

Syrian National Club .... 

United Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association 1 


120,636 42 
11,109 88 

3,009 47 
6,041 06 


4,500 00 

_3 

2,200 00 
3,500 00 


22,799 30 
704 36 

1,940 64 
1,380 75 


14,330 93 ; 


16 


United Syrian Society of Lawrence 6 . 


9,960 25 


- 


305 17 


440 09 


17 


Lee 
Ascension Farm School, Corporation of the 1 










18 


Leicester 
Leicester Samaritan Association . 

Leominster 


4,703 54 


- 


646 36 


1,349 25 


19 


Leominster Home for Old Ladies 


121,371 67 


- 


- 


400 00 


20 


Leominster Hospital Association (73 beds) 


347,055 61 


54,400 00 


9,821 45 


44,925 15 | 


21 

22 
23 


Lexington 
Isaac Harris Cary Educational Fund 
Lexington Home for Aged People _ 
Lexington Public Health Association, Inc. 


218,384 56 
66,122 62 
5,182 55 


- 


3,777 21 
4,780 54 


750 64 

6,192 77 

661 67 


24 


Lincoln 
Farrington Memorial Incorporated, The 1 

Lonomeadow 










25 


Doane Orphanage, The .... 


72,660 43 


- 


3,698 00 


3,443 64 i 


26 


Lowell 
L' Association Educatrice Franco-Americaine 
Inc. ....... 


8,712 19 


7,500 00 


918 25 


! 


27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 


Ayer Home, Trustees of 

Battles Home, The 

Channing Fraternity ..... 

Children's Home ..... 

Faith Home ...... 

Florence Crittenton Rescue League of Lowell 
Horn Home for Aged Couples . The 
Ladies' Gmeloos Chasodem Association, The 
Ladies' Helping Hand Society, The 
Lowell Association for the Blind, Inc. . 
Lowell Boys' Club Association 


359,774 80 

98,622 66 

9,660 17 

15,341 49 

31,254 92 

12,819 48 

30,753 27 

2,744 68 

2,795 74 

2,799 68 

71,228 88 


1,000 00 
1,000 00 


5,181 00 

194 63 

584 81 

2,079 00 

4,658 77 

624 15 

101 75 

248 90 

7,800 00 


1,523 80 
1,217 15 

2,154 70 
782 50 
200 00 

7,112 46 

142 78 

364 75 

37 29 


38 


Lowell Community Chest Association, Inc. . 


78,628 67 


- 


142,197 92 


- 


39 

40 
41 
42 


Lowell Corporation Hospital (100 beds) 
Lowell Day Nursery Association 
Lowell Dispensary ..... 
Lowell General Hospital (130 beds) 


149,160 40 

137,519 94 

6,164 34 

1,662,665 77 


: 


24,986 39 
170 00 
10 00 


55,202 06: 
1,386 95; 

84,898 11 ; 


43 


Lowell Good Will Industries, Inc. 


383 01 


- 


3,179 23 


22,105 77 


44 
45 


Lowell Greek Charitable Association, Inc., The 
Lowell Hebrew Community Center, Inc. 


108 59 
75,462 71 


16,700 00 


202 37 
4,972 50 


7,031 40 1 


46 


Lowell Humane Society, The 


47,605 80 


- 


557 00 


485 20 1 




- None. 1 No report. 


2 Organizatic 


ms aided. 


3 Not stal 


ed. 



I. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities 
nd Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 
and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$21 08 


$3,200 00 


$38,245 70 


35,443 80 


$6,676 65 


36 


\ 363 


} 101 


1 


2 


62 25 


- 


10,944 82 


11,859 37 


2,672 50 


{ v 

6 


537 


- 


- 


3 


935 55 


1,300 00 


14,889 63 


17,940 66 


5,808 50 


_3 


-3 


4 


915 69 


- 


16,714 33 


18,874 75 


9,476 10 


{ r 


} 809 


798 


_3 


5 


31,194 72 


/ 200 00< 
1 11,471 21 
12,281 21 


} 169,589 85 


168,150 20 


69,426 98 


73 


4,304 


260 


- 


6 


14,929 20 


36,297 57 


19,391 31 


5,613 54 


10 


39 


-8 


-3 


7 


87 14 


- 


11,998 04 


12,919 37 


1,800 00 


I 14 


} 251 


204 


" 


8 


1,274 18 


- 


59,854 93 


57,241 07 


29,737 19 


/ 85 
I 11 


| 3,294 


1,000 


~ 


y 


5,112 87 
179 60 


- 


42,292 54 
883 96 


39,738 20 
2,271 96 


22,217 60 


21 


38,570 

_3 


13,471 

-3 


6 


1U 
1! 

12 


- 


- 


1,940 64 
1,380 75 


1,755 59 
1,373 34 


900 00 


1 


- 


- 


- 


13 
14 
15 


3 72 


- 


748 89 


518 76 


32 50 


6 


/ I 2 

I 


} - 


1 


16 
17 

18 


45 50 


- 


2,041 11 


1,532 15 


799 96 


i 


328 


54 


175 


6,722 23 


_ 


7,201 53 


6,723 97 


2,677 39 


{ r 

23 


} » 

2,315 


11 


_ 


19 


2,321 69 


- 


50,610 63 


46,637 11 


17,726 00 


282 


- 


20 


11,748 85 
2,247 84 


9,983 87 


12,499 49 
22,222 09 
5,392 21 


6,484 52 
8,178 98 
4,054 55 


300 00 
3,227 15 
2,137 20 


1 
3 
1 


48 

8 

229 


48 

6 

79 


198 


21 

22 

23 

24 


2,342 61 


2,700 00 


12,239 41 


13,202 81 


5,073 86 


{ i' 


1 20 


4 


- 


25 


98 50 


_ 


2,338 94 


2,310 07 


_ 


. 


I 2* 
\ 103 
84 
18 

32 

151 
21 

72 
6 
33 
52 
14 
1,800 


} 60 
84 

129 

5 

72 

30 

_3 
_3 

1,800 




26 


15,220 96 
4,366 64 
422 41 
73 13 
907 61 
602 30 
107 88 

35 43 
70 63 


- 


16,744 56 

6,148 79 

422 41 

2,422 46 

2,274 92 

2,881 30 

11,879 11 

766 93 

501 93 

356 82 

7,800 00 


16,397 63 

4,400 39 

82 50 

3,984 23 

3,762 71 

2,206 67 

4,025 84 

682 00 

551 50 

461 66 

7,912 12 


4,070 19 
1,232 91 

1,118 25 

520 00 

1,320 00 

485 50 

36 00 

36 00 

71 43 

6,118 00 


n 

2 

4 
1 
1 
1 

16 
15 

1 

3 


34 

-3 

_3 

_3 


27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
$3 
14 
35 

37 


2,018 69 


- 


144,216 61 


139,411 26 


5,044 00 


I 3 

33 

4 

42 


} 132 

8,958 
89 
31 

3,054 


- 


- 


5S 


119 09 

6,151 11 

270 74 

76,806 19 


22,272 00 


82,306 56 

7,708 06 

280 74 

186,442 45 


83,540 29 

5,696 16 

81 53 

121,434 18 


30,769 17 
1,695 00 

40,839 29 


_s 
8 
31 
150 


4 


i9 
40 
41 
42 


- 


- 


25,285 00 


25,334 38 


20,352 09 


30 


/ 32 
\ 80 


} : 




13 


1,117 15 


" 


202 37 
13,240 40 


93 78 
11,525 03 


5,040 00 


4 




44 
45 


4,047 00 


12,949 78 


18,041 23 


5,528 70 


4,252 85 


4 


/ 92 
\ 199 


} 199 


62 


40 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



6 Report for months. 



100 



P.D. l|U 
Abstracts of Reports of Privaty 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Lowell — Con. 
Lowell Particular Council of the Society of 

St. Vincent de Paul 
Lowell Social Service League 
Lowell Visiting Nurse Association 
Lowell Young Men's Christian Association 
Ministry-at-large in Lowell, Mass. 
Old Ladies' Home . . . 

L'Orphelinat Franco-Americain . 
Phileducational Association of Georgitsiotes 

"Socrates" ..... 
Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston (St 

Peter's Orphan Asylum) . 
St. John's Hospital (157 beds) 
Young Women's Christian Association of 

Lowell ...... 



Ludlow 

Ludlow Hospital Society (28 beds) 

Lynn 

Aid Society of the Lynn Day Nursery . 

Associated Charities of Lynn 

Boys' Club of Lynn .... 

Charitable Travelers' Sheltering Association 
Inc. ! ..... . 

Columbus Guild of Lynn . 

Eliza J. Hahn Home for Aged Couples 

Greek Women's Aid Society of Lynn, Mass 
Harris Goldman Charity Fund, Inc., The 1 
Jewish Associated Charities of Lynn x . 
J. Fergus Gifford Shoe and Stocking Fund of 

the Lynn Rotary Club, Inc. 
Junior Aid Society, Inc. 
Lynn Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society 

Thei 

Lynn Home for Aged Men . 

Lynn Home for Aged Women 

Lynn Home for Children . 

Lynn Home for Young Women . 

Lynn Hospital (203 beds) . 

Lynn Jewish Orphans Relief Association : 

Lynn Tuberculosis League . 

Lynn Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. . 

Mirabeau Fresh Air Camp, Inc. . 

Neighborhood House Association 

Pullman Mission .... 

Union Hospital (90 beds) . 

Welfare Federation of Lynn, Inc. 

Women's Union for Christian Work 

Young Men's Christian Association of Lynn 

Malden 
Adelaide Breed Bayrd Foundation, The 
Associated Charities of Maiden . 
Girls' Club Association of Maiden, Inc. 
Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women 
Inc., The 

Maiden Anti-Tuberculosis Society, Inc. 

Maiden Arbeiter Ferein, Inc. 

Maiden Hebrew Free Loan Association l 
Maiden High School Scholarship 
Maiden Home for Aged Persons . 
Maiden Hospital (118 beds) 
Maiden Industrial Aid Society 
Maiden Young Men's Christian Association 
Monday Club of Maiden . 
Young Men's Hebrew Association of Maiden 
Young Women's Christian Association of 
Maiden * . . ... 



$749 96 

52 31 

11,415 05 

392,505 86 

88,657 77 

315,855 38 

207,716 50 


19,483 25 


102,426 30 
629,921 89 


153,800 92 


34,102 63 


35,540 40 
37,472 72 
42,029 27 


26,969 05 


88,183 76 


817 47 


767 94 
1,432 58 


227,832 66 


412,662 91 


51,604 68 


110,489 92 


,168,878 22 


2,433 11 
12,030 47 


20 53 


23,610 71 


47,959 79 


63,350 00 


1,314 88 


431,953 71 


30,739 00 

49,148 87 

9,280 60 


33,911 89 


4,014 78 


264 53 


10,472 56 
238,966 16 
559,282 40 
129,806 13 
400,936 88 
4,990 50 
286 00 



$8,000 00 



4,500 00 



15,000 00 



137,750 00 



17,000 00 



$213 95 

8,200 00 

10,800 00 

23,503 00 

430 90 

743 13 

959 04 


27 50 


1,208 61 
1,051 05 


18,124 00 


2,738 64 


13,527 45 
18,952 09 
5,700 00 


913 75 


82 36 


454 25 


1,314 11 
1,040 69 


410 00 


2,739 02 


737 00 


329 00 


21,290 66 


2,235 29 
4,581 66 


1,463 78 


7,351 00 


1,456 64 


5,875 00 


188,062 63 


40,525 00 


1,284 00 
1,640 00 


2,281 48 


12 00 


181 15 


225 69 

14,158 60 

964 97 

1,798 95 

6,488 13 

648 00 





- None. 



1 No report. 



* Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



101 



Z iritable Corporations — Continued. 














1 iterest, 

A/idends, 
. muities 
lit Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 

Expenditures 


Salaries 
and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




[ $42 79 

17 98 

3,339 35 

, 3,550 99 

12,213 91 

1 744 67 


$2,456 31 
3,575 32 


$256 74 
11,039 47 
31,583 73 
53,275 89 

6,438 20 
19,042 08 
34,802 00 


$366 86 
11,157 99 
33,092 32 
53,821 37 

4,849 28 
15,084 23 
34,431 88 


$4,674 94 

26,713 08 

25,549 13 

1,288 90 

5,188 70 

8,615 70 


3 

20 

19 

1 

9 

36 


-3 

5,079 

3 

46 
348 


-3 

1,154 
3 

_3 

56 


758 
308 

_3 

33 

_3 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


38 00 


- 


65 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


| 246 98 


7,272 00 


12,551 10 
121,963 77 


11,127 73 
109,946 63 


3,334 00 
36,940 36 


11 

53 


124 
5,989 


9 
2,109 


" 


9 
10 


1 2,891 51 


- 


60,915 40 


60,915 40 


29,164 55 


32 


9,323 


7,570 


_3 


11 


I 209 00 


- 


21,501 71 


20,248 78 


_7 


12 


526 


- 


- 


12 


: 888 44 
8 2,104 38 
1 3,125 35 


10,000 00 


37,339 73 

21,758 10 

8,895 01 


31,907 74 

21,881 10 

9,850 71 


7,698 92 
5,637 61 
5,389 99 


6 
4 
3 


1,251 

_3 


185 

-3 


821 


13 
14 
15 


11 24 


- 


7,307 83 


8,732 79 


1,876 60 


3 


246 


230 


60 


16 
17 


(1 5,344 38 


1,445 41 


7,372 15 


6,423 58 


2,530 53 


/ I 5 
I 3 


} I2 


12 


- 


18 


~ 


- 


1,107 30 


993 75 


- 


22 


- 


25 


19 
20 
21 

22 
23 


7 87 


- 


1,189 11 
2,267 94 


980 53 
1,876 92 


- 


- 


469 

_3 


469 

_3 


163 

_3 


1 12,781 48 


3,091 61 


16,648 19 


8,756 96 


1,915 00 


3 


- 


_ 


_ 


24 
25 


19,893 99 


5,150 00 


29,445 61 


15,261 98 


4,626 66 


/ I 5 

I 6 


I 2 

37 


} 36 
5 


1 


26 


! 2,466 38 


5,000 00 4 


3,001 90 


2,084 58 


- 


29 


- 


27 


. 7,020 28 


- 


14,353 73 


17,651 94 


6,498 88 


I 8 


72 
3,158 


J 1,538 


38 


28 


v 18,889 34 


/ 116,379 14 4 
\ 4,328 08 


| 208,772 36 


211,212 90 


90,838 66 


96 


12,622 


3,400 


- 


29 


23 90 
525 40 


- 


2,259 19 
13,039 18 


3,069 40 
14,149 25 


1,767 50 
11,783 66 


1 
8 


936 
1,563 


936 
147 


800 

_3 


30 
31 
32 


- 


- 


1,593 78 


1,571 91 


330 00 


3 


/ 4 * 
1 202 


J 202 


_3 


33 


■ 853 86 


- 


10,854 77 


10,321 42 


5,676 40 


/ 16 
\ 25 


J 1,042 


327 


32 


34 


2,685 43 


1,000 00 


7,522 69 


11,620 25 


- 


- 


28 2 

I 7 


} - 

28 


5 


35 


" 2,287 50 


- 


82,782 83 


69,815 83 


26,365 39 


29 


1,998 


- 


36 


829 06 


- 


183,915 44 


190,353 94 


7,815 00 


/ I 5 
\ 3 

35 


22 2 

_3 


} 


_3 


37 


1 14,993 36 


: 


101,282 52 


97,434 63 


45,596 47 


~ 




- 


39 


1,394 27 

2,134 98 

190 26 


- 


1,394 27 
3,672 93 
6,334 03 


655 00 
3,016 29 
5,635 05 


2,531 87 
1,473 90 


2 

2 


52 

77 


2 


209 
2 


10 

41 

42 


13 73 


3,750 00 


17,910 25 


13,421 79 


4,405 68 


6 


26 


4 


- 


43 


111 28 


- 


1,623 99 


1,358 93 


765 00 


! I s 


} - 


_3 


_3 


44 


- 


- 


497 84 


357 44 


30 00 


15 


/ 42 
I 11 


} » 


- 


45 


461 73 

'■ 9,380 00 

I 15,602 02 

4,434 32 

: 3,111 80 

224 09 


7,133 42 
20,000 00 * 


687 42 

33,397 99 

135,087 45 

8,320 02 

41,906 17 

2,477 16 

225 25 


407 00 

13,329 19 

171,756 14 

8,128 09 

41,242 45 

1,425 10 

93 15 


5,711 36 
75,331 79 

4,125 00 

17,350 67 

820 50 


8 
75 

5 
12 

3 


4 
27 

2,768 

_3 

1,1 60 B 

125 


4 

27 
31 

_3 


144 


46 

47 
18 
4!) 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 


4 Restr 


icted to capital. 


6 Paid o 


fficers. e 


Membership. 


I.N 


<>t Beparal 


i'ly report* 


d. 





102 








P.D. 17 




Abstracts of Report 


s of Privat 






Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


l 


_ Mansfield 
Mansfield Visiting Nurse Association . 


$2,293 90 


- 


$701 18 


$1,186 5( 


2 


Marblehead 
Marblehead Female Humane Society . 


60,315 75 


_ 


6,980 20 


400 0( 


3 

4 


Marblehead Visiting Nurse Association 
Young Men's Christian Association of Marble- 
head ....... 

Marlborotjgh 


19,882 47 
57,343 21 


_3 


1,221 08 
6,510 20 


518 5( 

3,174 2* 


5 


Hillside School 


150,733 06 


$38,074 00 


14,494 57 


16,259 2£ 


6 

7 


Marlborough Community Service, Inc. l 
Marlborough Hospital (76 beds) . 


184,776 34 


57,900 00 


79 15 


44,296 0£ 


8 


Marlborough Woman's Club 


2,348 60 


- 


1,159 55 


1,398 5fi 


9 


Unitarian Ladies' Charitable Society . 


4,987 07 


- 


395 04 


1,089 8C 


10 


Marshfield 
Nathaniel Taylor Fund Inc. 


6,719 85 


- 


317 00 


- 


11 


Maynaed 
Russian Educational Society of Mavnard, Inc., 
The 


14,050 69 


12,607 00 


283 42 




12 


Medford 
Lawrence Memorial Hospital of Medford (104 
beds) ....... 


757,221 48 




1,241 32 


108,980 4G 


13 


Medford Home for Aged Men and Women . 


129,099 65 


- 


5,932 21 


350 00 1 


14 
15 


Medford Visiting Nurse Association * . 
Sarah Fuller Home for Little Deaf Children . 


180,439 79 


- 


100 00 


. - 


16 
17 

18 


Melrose 
Fitch Home, Inc., The .... 
Melrose High School Scholarship Inc. . 
Melrose Hospital Association 1 (75 beds) 


355,474 42 
629 61 


: 


2,679 00 


5,341 951 


19 
20 


Methuen 

Arlington Day Nursery and Children's Tem- 
porary Home ..... 

Henry C. Nevins Home for the Aged and In- 
curable ....... 

MlDDLEBOROTTGH 


5,968 55 
234,690 11 


- 


2,300 05 
3,158 00 


5,349 32j 

■ 


21 


Fall Brook Mothers' Club, Inc. . 


3,059 33 


- 


36 23 


626 07] 


22 
23 


Montgomery Home for Aged People 

St. Luke's Hospital of Middleborough (17 beds) 


87,202 65 
113,430 00 


: 


46 00 
2,502 10 


- 
10,488 26 


24 
25 


Milford 
Home for the Aged at Milford . . 
Milford-Hopedale-Mendon Instructive Dis- 
trict Nursing Association 


11,902 89 
5,672 11 


_3 


5,616 25 


i 
6,173 21 ; 


26 


Milford Hospital (55 beds) .... 


441,184 56 


- 


500 00 


58,138 25 


27 


Young Men's Christian Association of Milford x 

MlLLBTJRY 










28 


Millbury Society for District Nursing . 


1,331 60 


_3 


1,139 00 


2,063 36 


29 
30 

31 
32 


Milton 

Kidder House Association . 
Milton Hospital and Convalescent Home (37 
beds) ....... 

Milton Social Service League 

Swift Charity » 


7,469 39 

83,545 07 
2,099 22 


- 


14,973 03 
5,308 31 


_ 

24,787 96- 
2,408 72; 


33 


MONSON 

Monson Home for Aged People, Inc. . 


95,078 85 


- 


6,372 64 


2,000 00 j 


34 


Montague 
Farren Memorial Hospital of Montague City, 
Mass., The (80 beds) 


252,401 16 


54,500 00 


4,938 56 


57,494 04 
1 




- None. l No report. 


2 Organizatio 


ns aided. 


3 Not stat 


ed. 

I 



Pt. II. 

a( Charitable Corporations — Continued 



103 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 
and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 
aided ex- 
clusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$33 66 

2,489 56 
810 54 

56 07 



61 41 

1,350 05 

44 81 

291 16 
241 79 

57 00 



17,539 48 
5,014 82 



),442 35 



14,350 02 
29 73 



34 18 

2,840 08 



50 20 



3,757 69 
3,890 52 



518 04 

159 50 
12,402 69 



47 19 



112 50. 
3,771 38 



2,682 87 



6,059 36 



$1,000 004 
1,000 00 

7,087 33 



10,000 00 



50 00 



711 81 
1,000 00 
3,750 00 



775 00 



37,900 00 



,334 



39,045 83 4 
100 00 



5,000 00 



2,005 28 ^ 



$1,921 40 

5,869 76 
3,550 12 

16,827 88 

33,057 92 

55,725 29 
2,602 92 

1,826 00 
558 79 

340 42 



126,519 94 
13,054 17 



9,442 35 



21,645 97 
29 73 



6,475 12 
49,247 40 



712 50 

10,138 37 
16,880 88 



518 04 

11,948 96 
71,140 94 



3,249 55 



112 50 



43,532 37 
7,717 03 



7,559 65 



64,669 96 



$1,881 00 

5,021 22 

2,195 86 

9,031 91 



33,091 09 

40,094 34 

2,428 09 

1,873 76 
530 88 

329 53 



113,875 42 
7,951 41 



4,706 19 



12,225 00 



5,744 89 
41,494 27 



162 03 

5,203 93 
16,415 32 



9,482 58 
67,011 91 



3,259 79 



230 14 



36,632 48 
7,964 01 



6,637 17 



49,787 91 



$1,250 91 

1,279 50 
1,774 65 
4,261 98 

11,596 57 

16,648 12 
1,350 00 

117 75 



48,087 94 
1,630 00 



4,666 59 
4,506 03 



2,450 50 
15,639 50 



1,820 00 
100 00 



7,095 00 
20,939 50 



1,686 00 
54 00 

_3 

4,154 46 
2,452 51 

11,700 56 



1 

( V 

I 4 

/ 2' 

1 7 



2,058 6 



20 
5* 
258 
392 
1,148 



60 

1,301 

62] 

458J 

19 2 

13 

12 

54 



2,910 
14 

14 
27 



338 



1,035 
2,874 



250 



995 
381 



1,340 



3906 



14 

145 



140 



35 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



Visits. 



104 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

ajid Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 


Nantucket 
Children's Aid Society of Nantucket . 


$6,513 55 




$44 00 




2 


Churchhaven, Nantucket, Inc. 


35,032 41 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Nantucket Cottage Hospital (25 beds) 


187,236 32 


- 


29,188 32 


$12,665 54 


4 
5 


Old People's Home Association of Nantucket 
Relief Association, The .... 


46,564 01 
44,242 99 


- 


404 00 
705 85 


859 05 


6 

7 


Union Benevolent Society, The . 
Wauwinnet Tribe No. 158 Improved Order of 
Red Men 


7,280 62 
21,184 16 


$17,000 00 


1,746 50 


- 


8 

9 

10 


Natick 
Leonard Morse Hospital (45 beds) 
Maria Hayes Home for Aged Persons . 
Natick Visiting Nurse Association 


372,363 92 

103,450 85 

2,838 22 


- 


100 00 
282 40 
485 88 


46,758 11 
2,716 65 


11 


Needham 
Glover Home and Hospital, The (11 beds) . 


40,059 50 


_ 


2,847 93 


12,350 04 


12 


King's Daughters Circle of '86, Inc. 


1,191 70 


- 


84 80 


182 95 


13 


Needham Visiting Nurse Association Inc. 
New Bedford 


571 26 


" 


2,388 33 


414 50 


14 
15 


Animal Rescue League of New Bedford 
Association for the Relief of Aged Women of 
New Bedford ..... 


93,761 52 
410,636 44 


; 


1,231 19 
1,007 24 


169 40 


16 

17 
18 
19 
20 


Charity Brotherhood of the Holy Ghost of the 
North End of New Bedford, Mass., Inc. 1 . 
Hachnosath Orchim Charitable Association l 
Hebrews Ladies' Helping Hand Society : 
Henryk Dabrowski Society 
Howland Fund for Aged Women, Trustees of 


6,722 82 
59,126 68 


3,000 00 


_ 


_ 


21 


James Arnold Fund, Trustees of . 


138,517 78 


- 


- 


- 


22 
23 

24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


Ladies' City Mission Society in New Bedford 
New Bedford Anti-Tuberculosis Association 

operating Sassaquin Sanatorium (118 beds) 
New Bedford Children's Aid Society 
New Bedford Country Week Society, Inc. 
New Bedford Day Nursery 
New Bedford Dorcas Society 
New Bedford Family Welfare Society 1 
New Bedford Home for Aged 
New Bedford Instructive Nursing Association 


103,973 22 

315,337 29 
288,072 19 

17,373 10 
136,546 36 

19,612 19 

96,218 44 
33,326 86 


5,000 00 


8,638 13 

648 67 
7,783 50 

427 75 

3,578 45 

10 00 

537 28 
9,193 37 


1,051 06 

106,631 78 
7,357 32 

1,515 39 

687 00 
16,674 16 


31 


New Bedford Men's Mission, Inc. 


20,764 06 


2,750 00 


1,980 28 


1,979 08 


32 


New Bedford Port Society .... 


78,158 35 


- 


161 32 


- 


33 
34 

35 


New Bedford Port Society, Ladies' Branch . 

New Bedford Women's Reform and Relief 
Association * . 

New Bedford Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion ....... 


64,720 89 
355,226 51 




27 00 
13,409 30 


11,896 59 


36 

37 
38 
39 


New Bedford Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation . .... 
North End Guild of New Bedford 
Portuguese Relief Association, Inc. 
Sacred Heart Home ..... 


409,422 91 

18,918 81 

285 37 

274,476 18 


77,700 00 
123,500 00 


28,528 89 

1,086 52 

791 14 

2,718 15 


22,732 17 
163 65 

30,216 92 


40 


St. Luke's Hospital of New Bedford (373 beds) 


3,386,542 09 


- 


71,363 98 


298,083 40 


41 


St. Mary's Home of New Bedford 


190,986 59 


- 


7,189 10 


9,872 00 


42 


Union for Good Works .... 


221,543 76 


- 


3,615 00 


1,500 00 


43 


Welfare Federation of New Bedford 


3,312 20 


2,929 37 


10,140 74 


- 


44 


Winfred Goff Homeopathic Hospital, The 


13,396 89 


- 


- 


- 


45 
46 


Newburyport 
Ann Jacques Hospital (60 beds) . 
Community Welfare Service of Newburyport, 
Inc. ....... 


826,265 60 
4,876 84 


_3 


20,442 20 
2,041 86 


48,553 55 
787 51 


47 


General Charitable Society of Newburyport . 


57,747 03 


- 


- 


- 


48 


Hale Fund Relief Association of the Newbury- 
port Fire Department, The 


10,828 10 


- 


- 


- 



- None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



» Not stated. 



Pt. II. 
















105 


Charitable 


Corporations — Continued. 












Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditure? 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Numbei 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$253 22 




$297 22 


$437 50 






2 






1 


1,166 00 


- 


1,317 70 


1,287 15 


$602 12 


{ I' 


} 67 


67 


- 


2 


7,753 35 


/ $10,000 00 « 
\ 400 00 


} 40,719 67 


48,439 66 


19,146 86 


16 


369 


32 


- 


3 


1,881 75 
2,470 08 


556 34 
1,500 00 


3,719 84 
4,675 93 


230 58 
2,651 30 


50 00 


1 E 


21 


-3 


- 


4 
5 


361 38 


- 


361 38 


391 60 


45 00 


/ 3 = 

1 3 


} 21 


-3 


6 


6 


1,624 00 


- 


3,370 50 


3,376 55 


427 36 


/ 2< 

I 5 


} 18 


2 


- 


7 


38,666 53 

4,587 72 

133 33 


1,000 00 * 
1,125 00 4 


85,524 64 
4,601 72 
3,416 78 


91,833 86 
3,886 66 
3,611 75 


40,900 91 
1,688 00 
2,713 00 


35 
3 
3 


1,273 

4 

665 


-3 

39 


_3 

64 


8 
9 
10 


616 64 


_ 


15.970 96 


16,188 36 


_3 


9 


573 


_ 


_ 


11 


49 56 


- 


317 31 


243 69 


- 


- 


/ 8 2 
I 2 
616 


} 2 

80 


2 


12 


- 


- 


2,802 83 


2,685 68 


1,755 00 


1 


125 


13 


1,200 01 


f 1,447 804 
1 62,754 21 


} 67,650 13 


7,001 41 


3,557 86 


4 


5,9406 


_3 


- 


14 


23,023 38 


/ 500 00 « 
1 3,420 00 


i 27,546 78 


25,221 95 


- 


- 


53 


43 


- 


15 

16 

17 


57 53 

3,046 97 


- 


708 35 
3,046 97 


603 11 

3,078 08 


62 00 


3^ 


22 

35 


35 


- 


18 

19 
20 


7,149 31 


- 


7,149 31 


7,585 97 


- 


- 


/ 62 

I 19 
5,724 


) 

4,293 


- 


21 


4,533 22 


- 


12,622 41 


16,372 27 


9,605 37 


6 


- 


22 


3,483 71 
15,340 10 
920 75 
5,705 03 
1,168 87 


8,500 00 

700 00 
600 00 i 


119,264 16 

30,480 92 

2,048 50 

10,798 87 

1,178 87 


109,943 88 
33,957 69 

2,539 52 
10,573 13 

1,101 43 


37,826 80 
13,906 90 

6,642 86 


43 
9 

12 


235 

188 

30 

261 

185 


103 
30 
82 

185 


-3 

-3 

137 

_3 


23 
24 
25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


3,012 70 
1,489 40 


50 00 
1,102 70^ 


4,286 98 
27,356 93 


3,054 71 
28,275 10 


627 00 
23,012 42 


3 
15 


8 
4,157 


5 
1,155 


" 


25 05 


- 


7,553 12 


6,077 14 


2,462 93 


{ r 


I -3 


_3 


" 


31 


4,124 39 


440 00 


4,725 71 


9,017 80 


2,550 00 


l 2 

1 


/ 5? 


44 


- 


32 


3,417 26 


- 


3,491 01 


4,518 36 


300 00 


9 


9 


- 


33 
34 
35 


10,639 72 


- 


35,998 93 


34,865 90 


23,269 25 


/ 5 5 

I 11 


} - 


- 


- 


2,000 75 

1,276 67 

12 81 

224 03 


7,448 00^ 


53,261 81 

2,526 84 

803 95 

33,159 10 


60,109 32 

2,206 92 

908 12 

27,617 36 


48,141 90 
1,872 00 

5,022 03 


65 

4 

23 


395 
157 


7 


_3 


36 
37 

3S 
39 


105,578 74 


/ 11,333 34" 
\ 507 62 


| 470,940 77 


432,444 62 


193,282 12 


200 


5,648 


387 


- 


40 


2,939 46 


2,200 00 


22,200 56 


14,271 89 


2,467 29 


2 


238 


113 


- 


41 


8,368 63 


- 


13,483 63 


14,228 81 


- 


- 


/ 22 

\ 26 


20 


40 


42 


11 42 


- 


10,162 16 


10,300 81 


8,398 62 


{ r 


J 172 


_ 


- 


43 


156 00 


- 


156 00 


- 


- 


- 


" 


44 


33,427 75 


1,575 37" 


102,278 49 


81,950 92 


32,044 85 


31 


1,738 


98 


- 


45 


3,148 39 


1,000 00 


6,977 76 


5,453 58 


2,700 00 


2 


471 


_3 


148 


40 


5,919 43 


- 


5,919 43 


5,126 30 


200 00 


{ !" 


} " 


_. 


-3 


47 


532 14 


- 


532 14 


1,008 80 


- 


- 


10 


10 


- 


48 


K 


Restricted to ca 


pital. 


6 p 


lid officers. 




6 Anim 


als. 







106 



P.D. 17.1 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 


Incum- 
brances on 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 
and 






reported 


Real Estate 


Refunds 




Newburyport — Con. 










1 


Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Newburyport, 












The 


$121 22 


- 


$120 85 


$165 87 


2 


Merrimack Humane Society 


17,154 29 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Moseley Fund for Social Service in Newbury- 












port, The . . . 


106,299 39 


- 


- 


313 46 


4 


Newburyport Anti-Tuberculosis Association 


17,323 53 


_3 


493 00 


1,680 61 


5 


Newburyport Bethel Society 


5,467 19 


- 


25 75 


- 


6 


Newburyport Female Charitable Society 


391 69 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Newburyport Homeopathic Hospital (25 beds) 


92,372 97 


- 


1,212 00 


15,585 33 


8 


Newburyport Society for the Relief of Aged 












Men 


124,637 06 


- 


500 00 


1,829 10 


9 


Newburyport Society for the Relief of Aged 












Women ...... 


284,449 58 


- 


128 12 


2,342 15 


10 


Newburyport Young Men's Christian Associa- 












tion ....... 


113,498 36 


- 


4,971 64 


9,628 72 


11 


Roman Catholic Archbishop in Boston (Chil- 
dren's Home) 1 










12 


Young Women's Christian Association of New- 












buryport ...... 


97,525 03 


~ 


1,079 97 


10,049 52 




Newton 










13 


American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions (Walker Home) 1 










14 


Baptist Home of Massachusetts, The . 


884,676 79 


- 


136,678 27 


- 


15 


Boys' Welfare League, Inc. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Charles D. Meserve Fund, Inc. . 


7,069 51 


- 


100 00 


- 


17 


Governor John A. Andrew Home Association 


11,735 83 


$7,500 00 


2,198 33 


4,947 50 


18 


Lamson Home, The ..... 


8,494 31 


- 


- 


- 


19 


Lucy Jackson Chapter, Daughters of the Amer- 












ican Revolution ..... 


12,213 17 


1,000 00 


7,143 34 


8 00 


20 


Mothers' Rest Association of the City of 












Newton, Incorporated, The 


47,116 02 


- 


3,658 02 


1,879 09 


21 


New England Peabody Home for Crippled 












Children 


1,525,433 77 


- 


13,397 92 


15,559 00 


22 


Newton Circle, Incorporated, The 


2,486 57 


- 


2,932 87 


469 25 


23 


Newton District Nursing Association . 


7,573 19 


_3 


3,898 52 


8,415 32 


24 


Newton Hospital (179 beds) 


1,691,242 54 


- 


2,837 24 


210,581 42 


25 


Newton Welfare Bureau, Inc. 


30,449 31 


- 


18,371 60 


1,277 54 


26 


Newton Young Men's Christian Association 


186,861 06 


- 


19,991 42 


35,290 98 


27 


Rebecca Pomroy Newton Home for Orphan 












Girls, Corporation of the 


82,035 65 


- 


4,558 87 


811 00 


28 


Senoj Lodge Associates, Inc. 


- 


- 


1,006 72 


1,639 60 


29 


Stearns School Centre .... 


1,455 24 


_3 


2,453 00 


- 


30 


Stone Institute and Newton Home for Aged 












People ....... 


502,094 47 


- 


6,169 12 


6,362 42 


31 


Swedish Charitable Society of Greater Boston 


98,380 65 


- 


8,783 96 


1,400 00 


32 


West Newton Community Centre, Incorpo- 












rated ....... 


6,323 10 


- 


3,220 97 


133 04 


33 


Working Boys' Home .... 


195,732 45 


4,996 73 


50,548 15 


14,631 00 


34 


Young Women's Christian Association of 












Newton, Massachusetts, Incorporated 


4,332 48 


- 


5,943 87 


1,013 69 




Norfolk 










35 


King's Daughters' and Sons' Home for the 












Aged in Norfolk County .... 


89,121 11 


- 


4,172 57 


3,536 16 




North Adams 










36 


North Adams Hospital (90 beds) . 


417,881 97 


- 


8.022 75 


56,148 14 


37 


Venerini Sisters, Inc. ..... 


23,960 66 


7,100 00 


4,225 32 


10,106 24 


38 


Young Men's Christian Association of North 












Adams ....... 


255,315 15 


45,334 00 


10,241 00 


11,599 53 




North Andover 










39 


Charlotte Home, The .... 
North Attleborouoh 


80,753 67 






" 


40 


North Attleborough District Nursing Associa- 
tion l . . . . 

Northampton 










41 


Children's Aid Association of Hampshire 












County ...... 


53,503 80 


- 


9,414 61 


5,909 57 



- None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



Not stated. 



[.II. 


















107 


'laritable 


Corporations — Continued. 












Interest, 
>ividends, 
Annuities 
d Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 








$286 72 


$328 83 






I 


72 
12 


> :' 


., 


1 


$630 80 


- 


630 80 


667 28 


$70 00 


36 


32 


- 


2 


5,912 84 
1,921 91 


_ 


6,226 30 
4,095 52 


4,906 96 
4,616 99 


2,008 00 


-3 




2,638 
80 


944 

80 


-3 

20 


3 

4 


285 78 


- 


316 01 


361 50 


- 


- 


{ 


32 
4 


} « 

_3 


- 


5 


190 25 

3,888 58 


- 


190 25 
20,686 91 


218 00 
27,261 77 


10,453 10 


11 


7 
407 


5 


6 

7 


8,710 01 


$1,000 00* 


11,052 65 


7,982 71 


2,825 06 


{ v 


} 


14 


- 


- 


8 


13,574 74 


10,265 02 4 


16,365 01 


11,593 42 


5,013 17 


{ r 


I 


27 


27 


11 


9 


2,999 99 


- 


17,600 35 


17,397 93 


7,605 83 


5 




309 


12 


- 


10 

11 
12 


5,628 34 


1,040 00 


17,856 54 


16,848 12 


5,407 84 


{ r 


} 


- 


- 


- 


28,752 17 


17,725 81« 


35,959 99 


37,574 19 


9,195 00 


{ .J' 

5 


} 


58 


_3 


_. 


13 
14 


395 60 

72 33 

461 75 


2,850 00 


395 60 

10,118 16 

461 75 


350 00 

9,682 56 

461 75 


3,561 03 




-3 
1 

16 

12 


_3 
1 


_3 


15 
16 
17 
18 


33 18 


- 


7,184 52 


2,131 87 


- 


- 




92 


- 


" 


19 


401 25 


500 00 


6,438 36 


7,421 43 


1,679 28 


7 




331 


331 


121 


20 


49,959 26 

79 75 

317 03 

24,371 40 

1,636 93 


75,842 57 

1,802 32 

/ 2,268 914 
\ 1,500 00 


154,758 75 

3,481 87 

14,433 19 

239,570 32 

} 22,786 07 


119,054 10 

3,880 21 

13,012 82 

271,955 93 

19,536 95 


49,517 22 

1,008 00 

7,741 73 

115,214 25 

5,597 77 


50 

1 

5 

104 

11 




133 
142 

1,612 
5,711 

12 


99 

142 

261 

1,855 


57 
404 


21 
22 
23 

24 

25 


3,722 71 


8,802 324 


59,643 22 


59,323 82 


16,335 96 


{ »r 




402 
2,600 


} 500 


_3 


26 


1,500 00 


3,468 27 


10,338 14 
2,646 32 


10,618 43 
2,646 32 


2,644 00 
230 00 


3 

1 




15 

157 


11 

10 


- 


27 
28 


78 20 


- 


2,531 20 


2,834 43 


2,234 42 


1 


{ 


32 

_3 


} - 


_3 


29 


21,155 05 

2,289 84 


4,997 29 
1,996 57 


37,944 38 
14,470 37 


20,814 26 
10,965 43 


6,888 57 
2,533 70 


8 
3 




25 
69 


25 

45 


15 


30 
31 


28 53 

78 95 


11,046 13 


3,382 54 
76,304 23 


3,810 09 
73,379 30 


2,280 52 
7,036 60 


7 
17 




406 
184 


224 
39 


_3 


32 
33 


92 27 


3,000 00 


10,049 83 


8,592 37 


5,874 20 


6 




42 
364 


} 166 


1 


34 


4,302 66 


1,500 (JO 4 


13,684 41 


11,653 91 


3,489 64 


5 




_3 


_3 


_3 


35 


- 


- 


65,500 30 
14,331 56 


84,872 84 
14,639 15 


31,113 66 

413 85 


31 




1,677 


12 


_3 


36 

37 


- 


- 


21,840 53 


23,220 66 


11,448 78 


8 


{ 


102 

8,159 


} : 


- 


38 


338 72 


- 


3,387 72 


1,302 42 


- 


- 




115 


19 


53 


39 


1,822 06 


1,500 004 


17,146 24 


18,543 73 


7,743 22 


6 




192 
241 


} 197 


_ 3 


40 
11 



4 Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers 



108 



P.D. I 
Abstracts of Reports of Priva jn 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and CiLts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Northampton — Con. 

Clarke School for the Deaf 

Cooley Dickinson Hospital, The 1 (125 beds) 

Father Matthew Total Abstinence and Bene- 
volent Society of Florence 

Hampshire County Public Health Association, 
Inc. i 

Lathrop Home for Aged and Invalid Women 
in Northampton ..... 

Smith Students' Aid Society, Incorporated . 

Students' Associated Housekeepers 

Wright Home for Young Women, The 

Young Men's Christian Association of North- 
ampton ...... 

NORTHBRIDOE 

George Marston Whitin Gymnasium Inc. 
Whitinsville Hospital, Inc., The (15 beds) 

Northpield 
Northfield Seminary Students' Aid Society 1 

Norton 
Barrowsville Community Service Corporation 
Newcomb Home for Old Ladies of Norton, 
Massachusetts, The .... 

NORWELL 

Norwell Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

Norwood 
Lewis and Anna M. Day Home for Aged in 
Norwood, Inc. ..... 

Norwood Civic Association 

Norwood Hospital (75 beds) 

Norwood Lithuanian American Citizens Asso- 
ciation ....... 

Oak Bluffs 
Marthas Vineyard Hospital, Inc. (13 beds) . 

Oranoe 
Orange Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., The 

Oxford 
Oxford Home for Aged People 

Palmer 
Wing Memorial Hospital Association (30 beds) 

Peabody 

Charles B. Haven Home for Aged Men in Pea- 
body ....... 

Female Benevolent Society at South Danvers 

Hebrew Ladies Gemilath Chessad of Peabody, 
Massachusetts 1 

Isaac Munroe Home for Orphan and Needy 
Children 

Peabody Finnish Workingmen's Association 
"Taimi" 

Peabody Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association 

Peabody Visiting Nurse Association 
Sutton Home for Aged Women in Peabody 

Pepperell 
Pepperell District Nurse Association, Inc. 
Pepperell Men's Club .... 

Petersham 
Petersham Exchange, The .... 

Pittsfield 
Associated Charities of Pittsfield 
Berkshire Benevolent Association for the Blind, 
Inc., The 



$1,957,555 72 
10,016 02 

305,280 64 

70,121 19 

247 07 

342,876 19 
87,395 60 



215,397 80 
81,111 31 



2,551 74 
279,608 17 

180 68 

176,425 23 
443,548 45 

11,071 13 

133,406 81 

294 69 

67,662 96 

38,268 50 



77,707 06 
24,734 12 



26,696 71 

6,220 50 

400 00 

2,156 44 

92,161 39 

72 



5,200 10 

32,746 18 
2,195 10 



$1,100 00 



1,700 00 
15,000 00 



2,000 00 



4,200 00 



$1,000 84 
82 30 



253 25 

2,825 00 
12,440 35 



9,475 57 



5,000 00 
9,372 15 



1,000 00 



415 05 



5,059 06 
576 87 

7,278 56 

1,788 22 



11 00 


9,742 75 


604 15 


1,009 96 


800 00 


451 25 
608 10 


779 00 
32 42 


549 84 


6,107 02 


1,551 58 



.None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



» Not stated. 



100 



aritable Corporations — Continued. 














iterest, 
vidends, 
anilities 
Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




51,229 85 


$1,360,795 26 < 


$183,725 78 


$164,967 47 


$80,230 90 


65 


154 


- 


- 


1 

2 


92 


- 


83 22 


107 36 


5 25 


1 


32 


2 


- 


3 

4 

5 
6 
7 


9,773 76 
3,360 34 


25,000 00 « 


17,808 96 
9,626 34 
12,440 35 


15,861 70 
9,261 88 
12,193 28 


6,239 0! 

180 00 

3,464 65 


7 
1 
5 


40 
45 
18 


- 


: 


19,028 55 


- 


19,028 55 


11,121 67 


3,808 21 


/ 3<> 
I 6 


} 18 


18 


- 


8 


4,084 65 


- 


23,503 69 


27,074 80 


11,259 97 


6 


/ 302 
I 3,950 


} 3,050 


- 


9 


14 51 

2,876 75 


- 


5,014 51 
25,054 27 


5,268 00 
25,071 79 


11,789 45 


13 


12 

890 


- 


- 


10 
11 

12 


1 00 


- 


1,001 00 


1,000 00 


- 


- 


_3 


-! 


_3 


13 


13,734 03 


45,231 00 


67,231 80 


6,456 39 


4,000 00 


4 


6 


6 


- 


14 


3 88 


- 


875 55 


1,047 87 


166 65 


1 


- 


- 


_3 


15 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


. 


_ 


_ 


. 




16 


14,439 35 


- 


16,505 42 


16,843 88 


7,957 19 


1 io 


} 5,000 


500 


- : 


17 


57 16 


/ 44 00 « 
\ 3,137 00 


J 94,098 76 


101,207 71 


46,957 26 


42 


2,978 


229 


- 


18 


- 


- 


1,112 52 


948 45 


- 


- 


42 


- 


- 


19 


3,114 98 


- 


23,704 83 


19,121 03 


9,791 77 


27 


258 


2 


~ 


20 


13 28 


- 


2,659 50 


3,015 64 


1,920 00 


1 


387 


16 


_3 


21 


3,706 21 


- 


3,717-21 


549 58 


- 


- 


- 


- 


" 


22 


425 18 


~ 


19,512 83 


21,842 32 


11,118 77 


14 


638 


- 


" 


23 


1,978 93 
919 50 


- 


2,588 88 
1,573 65 


2,201 82 
1,681 16 


589 40 
50 00 


2 
l 6 


4 
15 


2 


" 


24 
25 

26 


1,506 75 


- 


1,506 75 


1,138 92 


25 00 


1^ 


- 


- 


- 


27 


- 


- 


1,245 41 


1,273 92 


160 00 


1 


- 


- 


2 


28 


- 


- 


800 00 


803 00 


- 


- 


/ 6 2 
\ 30 
588 
9 


} - 

42 
6 


15 


29 


1 65 
4,282 27 


5,615 44 


4,172 53 
11,585 81 


3,747 11 

4,188 87 


3,206 50 
1,232 86 


2 

3 


33 


30 
31 


- 


- 


1,616 00 
32 42 


1,229 06 
32 72 


1,001 65 


1 


_3 

_a 


_3 
_3 


_3 

_3 


32 

33 


- 


- 


4,741 37 


5,287 30 


1,161 40 


4 


61 


" 


- 


34 


907 38 


- 


17,050 90 


16,382 98 


3,440 00 


2 


22 


- 


419 


35 


56 37 


- 


2,421 80 


1,814 77 


- 


- 


94 


_3 


_3 


30 



Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



110 



P.D. lj 
Abstracts of Reports of Privaw 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



1 

2 
3 


PlTTSFIELD Con. 

Berkshire Branch of Woman's Board of Mis- 
sions in Boston ..... 
Berkshire County Home for Aged Women 
Berkshire County Society for the Care of 
Crippled and Deformed Children, The 


$1,078 67 
319.201 13 

383,196 59 


-3 


$9,036 52 
3,928 10 

13,857 11 


$4,388 7; 


4 
5 
6 


Boys' Club of Pittsfield .... 
Epworth Mission of Pittsfield 
Hillcrest Surgical Hospital (40 beds) 


531,978 42 
18,785 59 
80,745 59 


" 


13,674 28 

67 57 

484 25 


53,152 2i 


7 


House of Mercy (189 beds) 


935,066 04 


~ 


32,509 77 


160,727 41 


8 
9 
10 
11 

12 


Kiwanis Health Camp of Pittsfield, Inc. 
Pittsfield Anti-Tuberculosis Association 
Pittsfield Day Nursery Association 
St. Luke's Hospital of Pittsfield, Massachu- 
setts Inc. (150 beds) .... 
Visiting Nurse Association of Pittsfield 


6,079 88 

218,265 96 

13,010 68 

564,456 72 
18,556 39 


$1,800 00 
407,500 00 

_3 


1,934 05 
11,138 00 
3,265 32 

9,425 33 
6,672 27 


6,406 41 
421 8* 

129,026 0c 
8,569 58 


13 
14 
15 


Plymouth 
Boy's Club of Plymouth .... 
Chiltonville Community Club, Inc. 
Jordan Hospital, The (66 beds) . 


28,019 04 

306 20 

310,931 90 


7,800 00 


1,833 48 

50 00 

1,327 30 


766 43 

666 83 

29,897 57 


16 


Long Pond Ladies Aid Society 


2,095 73 


- 


52 75 


288 33 


17 


Plymouth Community Nurse Association, In- 
corporated ...... 


116 08 


- 


1,328 43 


2,651 49 


18 


Plymouth Fragment Society 


52,680 59 


- 


79 00 


- 


19 
20 


Ryder Home for Old People, Corporation of 
Sunnyside, Inc. ..... 


57,415 92 
2,500 00 


- 


10,411 95 
1,829 35 


406 00 


21 


Pkinceton 
Girls' Vacation House Association 


41,658 01 


- 


1,155 15 


1,580 00 


22 


Provincetown 
Provincetown Helping Hand Society . 


64,737 02 


- 


- 


- 


23 
24 
25 
26 


Quincy 
Atlantic Women's Club, Inc., The 
City Hospital of Quincy (150 beds) 
Family Welfare Society of Quincy, Mass., The 
Knights of Columbus Civic Institute of 
Quincy, Mass. ..... 


1,695 45 

117,435 16 

11,374 46 

10,009 81 


-3 


98 60 
13,521 23 

2,347 85 


50 45 


27 


National Sailors' Home .... 


298,520 81 


- 


- 




28 


Quincy Day Nursery Association 


4,253 67 


- 


9 00 


- 


29 
30 


Quincy Women's Club .... 
Sailors' Snug Harbor of Boston . 


51,817 81 
491,543 82 


16,900 00 


6,790 02 


10,618 28 


31 


William B. Rice Eventide Home 


495,703 18 


- 


6,666 13 


2,273 50 


32 


Wollaston Woman's Club .... 


10,724 87 


- 


3,208 00 


1,021 79 


33 


Young Men's Christian Association of Quincy 


106,260 63 


17,000 00 


20,076 45 


13,427 94 


34 
35 


Randolph 
Boston School for the Deaf 
Seth Mann 2d Home for Aged and Infirm 
Women ...... 


511,886 32 
213,634 59 


95,000 00 


95,014 56 
200 00 


1,343 82 


36 

37 
38 


Readinoi 
Reading Home for Aged Women 
Reading Visiting Nurse Association 
Victory House Associates, Inc. . 


35,743 61 

4,996 56 

40 46 


- 


3,000 94 
1,263 40 


1,400 87 


39 
40 

41 


Revere 
Beachmont Catholic Club 1 
Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Association of 
Revere l ...... 

Home for Aged People in Revere J 










42 


Ingleside Corporation. .... 


128,116 50 


- 


2,480 49 


4,042 28 


43 


Revere Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 


3,428 00 


- 


3,010 00 


4,748 95 


44 
45 


Rockland 
French Home for Aged Women 1 
Hartsuff Post Memorial Association, Incorpor- 
ated ....... 


19,165 63 


_ 


25 00 


_ 



None. 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



111 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



$50 00 
16,119 49 


- 


$9,086 52 
20,563 17 


$9,073 58 
20,488 96 


$7,873 86 


7 


12 

29 


29 


- 


! 
2 


20,440 36 


- 


38,545 70 


42,771 66 


18,359 88 


I 1& 
I 14 


} « 

2,377 

_3 

7,598 


19 


- 


3 


25,202 42 
800 00 
709 56 


- 


38,876 70 

867 57 

55,362 81 


38,284 86 

695 62 

53,936 73 


19,866 16 
16,048 31 


1 25 
11 


2,377 

_3 

16 


_3 


4 
5 
6 


33,523 83 


/ $45,050 00 4 
1 5,500 00 


} 232,261 02 


252,721 05 


96,911 60 


91 


3,325 


306 


- 


? 


2,134 54 
179 00 




1,934 05 

20,116 07 

3,866 20 


1,889 83 
23,385 13 
4,014 21 


321 00 
8,105 53 
2,259 80 


4 
8 
4 


39 

15 

3,210 


39 


- 


8 
9 
10 


9,000 00 
800 79 


5,260 43 


152,711 79 
16,042 64 


149,122 54 
17,138 73 


26,212 43 
12,916 63 


58 
8 


3,553 
1,883 


85 
295 


- 


11 

12 


704 86 
8,867 71 


1,000 00 
1,500 OO 4 


4,304 77 

716 83 

40,590 92 


4,612 97 

946 44 

52,053 43 


1,971 66 

67 90 

22,326 95 


2 

1 

23 


442 
1,322 


16 

} ' 


- 


13 
14 
15 


- 


- 


341 08 


302 46 


- 


- 


/ 32 

I 1 


- 


16 


16 50 


- 


3,996 42 


4,285 34 


3,300 00 


2 


262 


10 


- 


17 


2,424 25 


3,100 00 


5,603 25 


1,848 85 


- 


- 


/ l 2 
I 18 
10 
16 


} - s 


26 


18 


2,023 34 


500 00 


13,341 29 
1,829 35 


2,501 93 
1,829 35 


780 00 
653 55 


1 
3 


9 
16 


- 


19 

20 


1,310 94 


- 


4,046 09 


4,022 37 


1,849 90 


9 


156 


32 


- 


21 


2,760 11 


- 


2,760 11 


2,743 71 


- 


- 


/ 22 

I 57 


} « 


32 


22 


6,022 72 
901 93 


5,108 51 4 


169 07 
6,022 72 
4,423 16 


188 12 
5,893 26 
4,424 67 


400 00 
3,090 00 


15 
2 


_3 


_3 


338 


23 

24 
25 


78 


- 


2,877 63 


2,594 39 


1,387 00 


{ r 


42 


- 


32 


26 


15,009 77 


- 


15,009 77 


17,821 92 


1,431 34 


} " 


14 


- 


27 


207 36 


- 


216 36 


460 00 


- 




{ 5 

2,224 
20 


} - 

227 
20 


1 


28 


1,357 55 
17,393 07 


- 


19,765 85 
17,393 07 


20,477 46 
14,587 22 


10,780 31 
3,926 57 


7 
5 

{ V 


-3 


29 
30 


4,119 92 


21,992 01 


35,051 56 


10,214 46 


3,858 00 


} > 2 


- 


- 


31 


59 96 


340 07 4 


4,289 75 


3,333 29 


- 




/ 242 
\ 33 


1 .. 


4 


32 


4,917 66 


- 


34,917 07 


37,635 85 


16,852 99 


8 


/ 582 
I 2,641 


J 930 




33 


987 74 


- 


97,346 12 


78,319 25 


36,463 00 


46 
/ 2* 
I 3 


207 

} v 


207 


- 


34 


11,888 82 


- 


11,888 82 


10,748 84 


3,494 00 


7 


- 


35 


2,396 40 


1,100 00< 
100 00 


5,397 34 
2,766 62 


5,627 42 
2,710 11 


1,988 41 
1,735 00 


3 

1 


9 
338 


_ 3 
35 


_3 


36 
37 

38 

39 

40 
41 

12 


1,955 90 


132 41 


8,644 75 


10,997 35 


5,327 52 


{ V 


} 29 
9,180 


4 


_3 


21 20 




7,780 15 


7,165 23 


5,158 56 


3 


2,054 


109 


43 


1,179 50 


- 


1,204 50 


1,325 04 


465 00 


1 


- 


- 


- 


44 
45 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



112 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 


Rutland 
Central New England Sanatorium, Inc. (90 
beds) ....... 


$456,985 24 


$45,000 00 


$28,901 00 


$116,906 01 


2 


Rutland Entertainment Association, Inc. 


2,282 95 


- 


1,516 00 


- 


3 


Rutland Masonic Charitable and Educational 
Association ...... 


3,077 62 


- 


100 00 


- 


4 


Salem 
Association for the Relief of Aged and Desti- 
tute Women in Salem .... 


464,253 47 




985 00 




5 


Bertram Home for Aged Men 


350,842 94 


- 


- 


- 


6 

7 
8 
9 


Bungalow Associates, Inc., of Salem 1 . 
Children's Island Sanitarium, Inc. (98 beds) 
City Orphan Asylum ..... 
Family Welfare Society of Salem 


98,721 98 
57,209 53 
40,410 88 


- 


13,590 00 
8,195 33 


774 81 

2,875 52 


10 


Gemilath Chesed of Salem, Inc. . 


386 00 


- 


201 00 


1,217 00 


11 

12 

13 

14 
15 
16 


House of Seven Gables Settlement Association, 
Thei 

Independent Polish Socialist Society Inc., 
Salem Branch 1 

Lydia E. Pinkham Memorial, Incorporated, 
The 

Mack Industrial School .... 

Marine Society at Salem in New England 

North Shore Babies' Hospital, The (50 beds) 


117,764 21 
76,316 53 

147,877 15 
99,858 57 


- 


9,500 00 
261 56 

20,462 62 


348 40 

7,982 92 


17 


Plummer Farm School of Reform for Boys, The 


166,956 70 


- 


- 


5,294 09 


18 
19 


Salem Animal Rescue League 
Salem Association for the Prevention of Tuber- 
culosis ....... 


8,865 00 
2,441 49 




872 54 
5,964 97 


219 21 

1,831 26 


20 
21 
22 
23 


Salem Charitable Mechanic Association 

Salem East India Marine Society 

Salem Female Charitable Society 

Salem Fraternity ..... 


3,097 81 

39,975 82 

1,273 11 

165,669 07 


- 


165 00 

462 22 


642 96 


24 


Salem Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society 6 


546 28 


- 


604 10 


359 21 


25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 


Salem Hospital (132 beds) .... 

Salem Relief Committee (Inc.) 
Salem Seamen's Orphan and Children's Friend 
Society x ...... 

Salem War Chest Association . . 
Salem Young Men's Christian Association 
Salem Young Women's Association 
Samaritan Society, The .... 

Sarah E. Sherman Memorial Association 
Seamen's Widow and Orphan Association 


1,694,184 86 
10,818 05 

27,282 23 
279,021 18 
38,296 07 
65,424 98 
1,653 50 
80,896 57 


29,600 00 
3,920 00 


15,210 94 
976 71 

9,208 07 
934 60 
203 00 
117 00 


172,766 25 
604 00 

11,376 13 

2,399 55 

19 01 


34 


Woman's Friend Society .... 


82,316 51 


- 


2,572 93 


12,760 71 


35 


Sandwich 
Sandwich Health Association, Incorporated . 


1,042 39 


- 


1,131 25 


143 00 


36 


Satjous 
Women's Civic League of Cliftondale, Inc., The 


2,681 34 


-3 


345 75 


149 68 


37 

38 


Scituate 
Arwile Inc. x ..... 
Children's Sunlight Hospital (70 beds) 


97,009 58 




21,352 36 




39 


Lydia Collett Corporation, The . 


5,923 87 


3,000 00 


12 25 


- 


40 
41 


Sharon 
Boston Lakeshore Home .... 
Sharon Sanatorium (51 beds) 


51,544 40 
456,967 39 


_ 


25 00 
18,213 63 


14 48 
35,535 65 


42 


Sherborn 
Sherborn Widows' and Orphans' Benevolent 
Society ....... 


16,075 19 


_3 


8 00 


. 


43 


Shirley 
Altrurian Club of Shirley * . 










44 
45 
46 


SOMERVILLE 

Associated Charities of Somerville 
Hutchinson Home Corporation for Aged Women 
Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor 1 


66,075 68 
59,804 31 


-3 


2,148 39 


853 00 



None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



» Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



113 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
"Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$6,708 18 




$153,148 71 


$175,534 58 


$67,960 35 


37 


220 


67 




1 


- 


- 


1,516 00 


756 48 


- 


- 


/ 12 

1 450 


} 450 


15 


2 


168 00 


- 


268 00 


254 42 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


20,013 69 


$11,637 024 


20,998 69 


24,076 42 


9,838 90 


10 


41 


41 


. 


4 


15,513 79 


8,272 97 


23,786 76 


13,922 42 


5 199 59 


{ V 


} » 


19 


- 


5 

6 
7 
8 
9 


5,257 33 
1,316 87 
1,681 48 


5,000 00 
3,106 23 


24,622 14 

1,316 87 

16,063 11 


18,644 73 
12,526 04 


8,416 21 
6,284 59 


27 
4 


112 


112 


313 






1,418 00 


1,771 00 






/ 22 

\ 22 


I 


15 


10 

11 


6,577 55 

3,781 75 

7,927 06 

305 90 


3,700 00 


16,077 55 
4,391 71 
7,927 06 

31,349 03 


5,951 27 

3,366 02 

7,227 96 

25,623 10 


2,802 25 

1,473 90 

1,300 00 

11,695 82 


3 
3 

3 5 
10 


2,557 
236 


2,557 
62 


_3 


12 

13 
14 
15 
16 


9,438 21 


- 


14,732 30 


14,605 00 


5,309 50 


{ r 

i 


} 39 
1,674- 


14 


- 


17 


358 19 


1,500 00 


2,944 94 


1,138 15 


_3 


_3 


- 


18 


66 80 


50 00 


7,924 47 


7,956 98 


4,162 29 


7 


f 12 

\ 266 

8 

70 

34,433 


} 266 
8 

_3 
-3 


_3 


19 


124 56 
1,790 69 
2,002 54 
7,768 30 


5,000 00 4 


124 56 
1,790 69 
2,167 54 
8,873 48 


80 00 
1,755 50 
2,266 03 
8,908 49 


50 00 
200 00 

4,647 21 


2 = 

IB 

8 


_3 


20 
21 
22 
23 


- 


- 


963 31 


988 52 


- 


- 


/ 22 

\ 25 

8,356 

400 


1 25 

3,268 
250 


15 


24 


29,229 17 
635 18 


— 


217,206 36 
2,215 89 


217,206 36 
2,043 62 


93,026 71 
1,000 00 


90 
1 


~ 


25 

26 


1,118 66 
15,441 06 
3,319 78 
1,884 31 
75 00 
5,581 97 


3,356 23 
600 00 

300 00^ 


1,118 66 
36,132 45 
10,010 16 

2,721 32 
92 00 

5,581 97 


25 00 

33,795 46 

3,992 04 

3,458 68 

40 00 
5,581 97 


15,759 15 
2,056 00 

300 00 


12 
3 

1* 


5,000 

189 

68 

2 

28 


3,600 
3 

68 

2 

28 


20 


27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 


3,260 92 


3,000 00 


21,605 45 


17,759 82 


7,748 52 


! l 6 
I 6 


J 433 


143 


_3 


34 


285 05 


- 


1,559 30 


1,798 98 


650 00 


1 


450 


365 


- 


35 


- 


- 


495 43 


348 56 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


36 
37 


692 04 


- 


21,632 40 


18,746 07 


6,814 23 


18 


166 


166 


- 


38 


240 00 


- 


969 43 


415 28 


60 45 


1 


/ 32 

I 


} - 


_3 


39 


2,052 50 
18,654 68 


250 00 
30,000 00 4 


2,341 98 
73,032 46 


340 93 
72,610 51 


20,337 27 


32 


_3 

61 


-3 
1 


_3 


40 
41 


889 50 


- 


897 80 


795 52 


- 


- 


12 


_3 


_3 


42 

43 

44 

45 
46 


3,665 51 
2,843 53 


2,900 00 
3,750 00 


8,906 33 
7,446 53 


6,933 78 
2,691 87 


2,520 00 
123 00 


2 


200 
4 


200 

_3 


92 



* Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



Report for 14 months. 7 Animals. 



114 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 




SOMEBVILLE Con. 










1 


Somerville Home for the Aged 


$534,671 00 


- 


$1,956 36 


$13,997 29 


2 
3 
4 
5 


Somerville Hospital (80 beds) . . 
Somerville Hospital Ladies' Aid Association 
Somerville Rotary Educational Fund, Inc. . 
Somerville Young Men's Christian Association 


191,325 36 
2,382 58 
1,624 75 

166,515 56 


$35,000 00 


6,456 00 

211 00 

1,983 12 

26,423 50 


84,051 50 
227 59 

6,737 38 


6 


Visiting Nursing Association of Somerville . 


2,196 56 


_3 


563 00 


6,041 45 


7 


Washington Street Day Nursery of Somerville 


5,904 76 


- 


- 


- 


8 
9 


SOUTHBRIDGE 

Harrington Hospital Corporation 
Young Men's Christian Association of South- 
bridge ....... 


100,001 86 


~ 


214 84 


5,535 25 


10 


Spencer 
Spencer Good Samaritan and District Nurse 
Association ...... 

Sprinofield 


22,834 65 


~ 


1,199 40 


765 50 


11 


American International College . 


413,549 60 


39,500 00 


42,683 54 


31,993 00 


12 


Baby Feeding Association of Springfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Catholic Woman's Club of Springfield . 


3,657 71 


-3 


1,505 50 


3,001 34 


14 
15 
16 

17 


Community Chest of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts ....... 

Community Welfare Association of Springfield, 
Massachusetts 6 . . . . . 

Congregation of the Daughters of Our Lady 
of Mercy 1 ..... 

Daughters of Jacob Free Loan Association * . 


63,838 14 




343,655 53 


— 


18 


Daughters of Zion Old People's Home . 


12,970 90 


- 


3,002 82 


400 00 


19 


Family Welfare Association of Springfield 


74,463 22 


- 


42,444 91 


2,319 80 


20 
21 
22 
23 


Good Shepherd Association of Springfield, The 
Good Will, Inc., The . ... 
Hampden County Children's Aid Association 
Hampden County Tuberculosis and Public 
Health Association ..... 


157,078 37 
106,268 35 
46,543 97 


5,000 00 


22,816 89 
12,919 71 
8,806 18 


46,272 36 
12,517 51 
20,668 89 


24 


Hampton Club, Inc. of Springfield, Mass. 


275 13 


- 


649 00 


458 70 


25 


Horace A. Moses Foundation, Incorporated . 


3,683,591 07 


- 


- 


42,465 42 


26 


Horace Smith Fund, The .... 


309,056 79 


- 


- 


4,273, 21 


27 


James W. Hale Fund, Trustees of 


35,347 50 


- 


- 


- 


28 


Jewish Social Service Bureau, Inc. 


14 00 


- 


10,479 24 


472 61 


29 


Junior Achievement, Incorporated 


111,683 74 


- 


40,272 20 


1,927 14 


30 

31 
32 
33 


Legal Aid Society of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, Inc. x ..... . 

Mercy Hospital (320 beds) 

Mount Carmel Society, Inc. 1 

Particular Council of the Society of St. Vincent 
de Paul of Springfield, Mass., The . 


765,826 41 
18,115 13 


126,000 00 


24,699 00 
10,259 90 


191,741 67 
3,613 74 


34 


St. John's Institutional Activities 


230,862 96 


12,800 00 


20,224 31 


7,601 27 


35 


Service League Foundation, Inc. 


1,040,525 95 


- 


10,679 00 


- 


36 


Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children, The 
(60 beds) 


513,941 85 


_ 


82,902 77 


688 15 


37 


Springfield Boys' Club .... 


256,891 38 


4,100 00 


25,718 50 


12,695 20 


38 


Springfield Day Nursery Corporation . 


166,836 38 


- 


16,974 33 


1,537 48 


39 


Springfield Girls' Club .... 


75,568 26 


1,500 00 


14,098 40 


3,403 99 


40 


Springfield Home for Aged Men . 


306,347 26 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


41 
42 

43 

44 


Springfield Home for Aged Women 

Springfield Home for Friendless Women and 
Children ■ 

Springfield Hospital, The (190 beds) . 

Springfield Nursing and Public Health Asso- 
ciation ....... 


409,345 16 

400,947 71 
1,732,032 28 

1,015 00 


- 


5,410 00 

6,027 90 
26,161 34 

18,153 33 


2,481 48 

3,051 42 
240,903 29 

32,984 68 



- None. * No report. 2 Organizations aided. 

8 Name changed to Community Chest of Springfield, Massachusetts. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



115 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 





Families 


Indi- 


aided 


viduals 


exclu- 


aided 


sive of 


Free 


Indi- 




viduals 



$8,150 00 
2,700 00 



851 75 



71,446 30 
15,859 30 ^ 



5,276 57 



1,000 00 

14,688 00 

14,783 25 

14,229 96 



277 



$37,772 00 


99,458 97 

458 19 

2,035 50 

33,828 02 


7,203 95 


297 56 


11,554 42 


2,583 19 


81,154 14 


4,641 71 


349,695 44 



3,402 82 

49,425 27 
69,155 24 

30,522 90 

29,664 81 

1,149 48 

340,912 94 

23,465 03 

1,903 64 

10,951 91 

42,286 19 



192,238 00 

13,873 64 
26,987 63 

62,447 45 

, 83,963 62 
38,702 91 

17,273 10 
14,503 55 
10,349 70 
26,921 53 

27,506 24 
339,913 15 

51,415 99 



$18,216 16 

87,211 84 

1,174 61 

410 75 

40,769 75 

7,457 76 

250 00 



14,150 43 
2,038 82 

101,317 68 

4,356 04 
323,356 48 

3,386 47 

50,474 19 
65,491 35 

31,452 10 

26,574 98 

1,118 27 

130,594 99 

13,353 78 
2,051 34 
10,823 50 

59,305 42 

187,812 53 

11,823 69 
31,957 40 

64,414 42 

80,572 41 
38,676 14 

16,930 36 
14,563 12 
10,293 25 
28,905 13 

29,385 80 
340,222 81 



51,415 



$5,600 54 
38,261 45 



16,067 19 
6,530 05 



5,525 19 



1,645 00 



59,277 18 



6,093 13 



806 20 

15,387 09 

8,677 80 

9,267 89 
12,315 55 

16,514 99 

430 00 

97 88 

3,014 22 

32,514 04 



11,646 37 
12,586 72 

45,808 33 
13,759 67 

8,330 41 
8,094 03 
3,241 00 
10,576 45 



/ 1 

I 6 

35 



13,220 
140,690 



40,375 29 



62 



3 

20 

14 

20 
I 1 
4 

11 

24 
152 



50 
3,305 

12 

2 

42 
1,357 
3 2 



237 
359 

165 

72 
345 

27 2 



354 

141 

502 
3,421 
32 
792 



57 
465 



,4«)5 



299 
1,500 

112 

10 
557 

112 

2,850 
42 
104 
1,050 

13 
59 

282 
16,735 

7,097 



180 



;v; 



351 

26 

6,421 



465 



:>5 



557 
525 



190 
,864 



2,732 



143 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



116 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 


Speinopield — Con. 
Springfield Rescue Mission, The . 


$105,391 27 


. 


$6,541 93 


$5,932 03 


2 


Springfield Young Men's Christian Association 


659,630 60 


$129,000 00 


121,732 81 


162,116 21 


3 
4 
5 

6 

7 


Springfield Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion ....... 

Travelers Aid Society of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts ...... 

United Courts of Massachusetts Catholic 
Order of Foresters of Springfield, Inc. 

Wesson Maternity Hospital (51 beds) . 

Wesson Memorial Hospital (120 beds) 


221,011 82 

38,599 39 
558,629 76 
857,515 56 


13,000 00 
20,275 00 
38,000 00 


21,933 94 

6,247 00 

3,701 83 
8,154 72 


37,787 41 
227 96 

88,846 43 
123,957 84 


8 


Stockbridoe 
Austen Riggs Foundation Inc. 


150,407 86 


- 


23,730 23 


70,655 80 


9 


Stoneham 
Home for Aged People in Stoneham 


99,532 40 


_3 


1,617 00 


_ 


10 


Stoneham Visiting Nursing Association 


1,588 06 


" 


1,041 29 


1,435 00 


11 


Stouohton 
South Stoughton Community Service, Inc. . 


5,137 43 


2,600 00 


352 00 


314 44 


12 


Stow 
Red Acre Farm, Incorporated 


145,662 02 


- 


2,237 50 


3,551 00 


13 


Sutton 
Wilkinsonville Community Association 


2,122 10 


- 


- 


- 


14 


Swampscott 
Florence Crittenton Rescue League 


18,684 56 


- 


6,899 77 


7,162 52 


15 


Swansea 
Rest House, Inc. ..... 


152,566 38 


- 


3,500 00 


7,043 02 


16 

17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 


Taunton 
Bethlehem Home ..... 

Hebrew Ladies' Helping Hand Society of 
Taunton ...... 

Morton Hospital (75 beds) 
Social Welfare League, Inc. of Taunton l 
Taunton Boys' Club Association of Taunton 1 
Taunton Female Charitable Association 
Taunton Girl's Club, Incorporated, The 


35,514 03 

126 76 
255,810 86 

115,598 64 
17,876 46 


2,000 00 


6,028 91 

266 48 
19,629 16 

1,838 20 
4,027 88 


5,167 20 

55,112 33 

3,745 59 


23 


Taunton Visiting Nurse Association Inc., The 


32,851 28 


309 00 


3,175 95 


8,525 85 


24 


Young Men's Christian Association of Taunton 


50,095 23 


15,000 00 


11,466 50 


4,431 80 


25 

26 


Templeton 
Hospital Cottages for Children (140 beds) 
Woman's Board of the Hospital Cottages for 
Children at Baldwinville, Massachusetts . 


515,956 01 
21,057 99 


- 


5,558 75 
1,466 72 


34,751 53 


27 


TOPSFIELD 

Topsfield Community Club 


3,583 63 


- 


486 00 


1,886 80 


28 


Uxbridge 
Uxbridge Samaritan Society 


7,206 09 


- 


771 09 


2,019 39 


29 
30 
31 


Wakefield 
Elizabeth E. Boit Home for Aged Women 
Wakefield Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Society 
Wakefield Visiting Nurse Association . 


70,029 33 

173 46 

6,701 19 


_3 


3,822 15 

62 50 

3,030 31 


417 57 
2,013 00 


32 


Walpole 

Walpole Visiting Nurse Association 


385 50 


- 


2,784 00 


1,908 51 


33 
34 
35 


Waltham 
Leland Home for Aged Women . 
Mt. Prospect School, The .... 
Waltham Animal Aid Society 


159,221 82 

594,039 66 

6,447 50 


- 


359 62 
2,950 95 


250 00 

1,600 00 

138 05 



- None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



8 Not stated. 



Pt. III. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



n: 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rental- 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Numbei 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 

Free 



Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



$31 00 
16,414 72 



$200 00 



1,000 00 



500 00 



20,002 89 



150 00 



15,000 00 



4,000 00 



2,000 00 J 
8,000 00 



7,483 09 



1,250 00 



4,750 00^ 



$12,509 37 
229,460 85 

64,861 97 

6,478 21 

3,813 83 
106,561 67 
138,482 71 

95,386 03 

7,004 95 
3,030 89 

694 37 

15,099 32 

28 17 

14,307 66 

15,820 05 

11,535 91 

266 48 
81,981 94 

11,281 11 
795 61 

19,386 92 
15,898 30 

62,262 58 
2,700 14 

2,539 97 

2,790 48 



10,418 60 

62 50 

5,274 26 



4,714 82 



7,271 67 
17,842 72 
3,168 31 



$14,308 19 
228,559 91 

65,202 61 

6,347 94 

2,905 02 
106,473 30 
150,658 08 

101,190 25 

3,628 77 
2,809 71 

411 06 

10,865 29 



14,447 47 



12,175 57 



10,639 18 



324 03 
81,293 86 



7,241 94 
767 50 

11,983 55 
14,139 42 

69,833 18 
2,525 79 

2,265 94 

3,207 12 



5,881 32 

83 50 

5,571 89 



5,043 06 



8,099 14 

15,879 17 

1,846 47 



$4,647 42 

109,065 71 

32,581 79 

5,459 49 



49,166 69 
56,399 46 



28,044 90 



2,410 30 



4,522 75 



2,836 00 

4,891 18 

1,677 43 

38,598 65 

2,530 53 
640 00 

9,618 10 
6,302 83 

34,919 42 

1,749 95 

1,850 00 

2,835 43 
2,931 00 

3,511 29 



3,256 60 

8,235 32 

336 00 



20 



22,356 

462 

16,432 

89,566 

8,181 



1,198 
2,997 



3,479 



/ 22 

\ 2,843 



82 

1,454 « 



55 



72 
387 



300 

163 
2,214 

14 

80 

1,981 

42 

876 
173 



3,441 



12 

42 
366 



390 

14 

6 

1,159' 



4,856 

7,532 

21,771 



3,219 



746 



1,350 



188 



118 
29 



30 

675 



110 



1,153 

12 
60 

37 



14 

3 

1,159' 



* Restricted to capital, 



6 Raid officers. 



Animals, 



118 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 


Waltham — Con. 
Waltham Baby Hospital, The (22 beds) 
Waltham District Nursing Association 


$54,597 16 
18,095 69 


- 


$1,387 28 
1,031 00 


$1,188 75 
3,746 15 


3 


Waltham Graduate Nurse Association . 


448 41 


- 


596 50 


_ 


4 
5 
6 


Waltham Hospital (150 beds) 

Waltham Social Service League . 

Young Men's Hebrew Association of Waltham 1 


842,612 82 
198 69 


: 


6,714 42 
3,490 79 


122,571 60 
39 50 


7 


Ware 
Mary Lane Hospital Association (34 beds) . 


762,063 48 


$38,000 00 


38,952 50 


26,418 02 


8 

9 

10 

11 
12 
13 


Watertown 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 

for the Blind 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 

for the Blind (Kindergarten for the Blind) . 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 

for the Blind (Howe Memorial Press Fund) 
Watertown Associated Charities . 
Watertown District Nursing Association 
Watertown Home for Old Folks . 


2,671,649 17 

2,271,288 02 

192,713 59 

1,224 18 

14,305 06 

92,026 89 


- 


109 75 

1,445 74 

421 42 


67,072 04 

45,030 00 

9,770 40 

6,907 99 


14 


Wellesley 
Convalescent Home of the Children's Hospital, 
The 


519,656 43 


. 


20,374 00 


3,893 39 


15 


Wellesley Friendly Aid Association 


10,148 85 


- 


4,768 96 


3,373 70 


16 
17 


Wellesley Hospital Fund, Incorporated 
Wellesley Students' Aid Society, Inc. . 


66,120 11 
111,521 49 


- 


3,150 00 
21,244 89 


1,419 54 
6,362 92 


18 


Westborotjgh 
Kirkside, Inc., The ..... 


80,185 20 


_ 


_ 


1,749 50 


19 


Westborough District Nurse Association 


632 64 


- 


1,172 06 


375 05 


20 


West Boylston 
Ladies Relief Corps of West Boylston, Mass., 
Inc. ....... 


2,640 27 


. 


62 16 


485 33 


21 


Westfield 
Noble Hospital, Trustees of (107 beds) 


422,619 00 


74,000 00 


951 25 


59,718 22 


22 


Sarah Gillett Home for Aged People, The 


60,208 63 


- 


60 00 


7,270 00 


23 

24 


Shurtleff Mission to the Children of the Desti- 
tute, The 

Young Men's Christian Association of West- 
field 


118,944 74 
30,152 08 


17,500 00 


51 00 
7,126 19 


313 00 

2,053 08 


25 


Westford 
Ladies' Sewing Society and Women's Branch 
Alliance of the Unitarian Church 


10,978 81 








26 


Westport 
Wautuppa Grange, No. 365, Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, Incorporated .... 


15,262 26 


4,500 00 


670 75 


1,651 10 


27 

28 

29 


West Springfield 
Springfield Goodwill Industries, Inc. 
West Springfield Neighborhood House Asso- 
ciation ....... 

West Springfield Relief Association, Incorpo- 
rated 7 ....... 


10,254 26 
231 96 


12,300 00 


1,614 15 
13,775 40 


19,942 95 
217 99 


30 
31 


Weymouth 
Weymouth Hospital (50 beds) 
Weymouth Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 6 


98,701 14 
1,296 04 


4,000 00 

-3 


2,756 77 


61,766 37 
2,741 51 


32 


Whitman 
Rogers Home for Aged Women . 

WlLLIAMSTOWN 


33,931 82 


" 


765 35 


15 75 


33 


Williamstown Welfare Association 


6,158 74 


" 


8,787 55 


573 00 


34 
35 


WlNCHENDON 

Winchendon Boys Club, Inc. 
Winchendon Hospital, Incorporated 


17,914 42 
4,698 55 


- 


7,390 14 
920 20 


- 



-None. 1 No report. 2 Organizations aided. 

7 Name changed to West Springfield Neighborhood House Association. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 
















119 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 












Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

, and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$2,659 45 
215 71 


$3,656 27 


$5,235 48 
8,706 68 


$5,214 70 
3,878 33 


$2,755 18 
1,200 00 


4 

1 


848 
443 


790 
138 


- 


1 

2 


- 


- 


596 50 


705 32 


- 


- 


{ V 

3,059 


} - 

310 


- 


3 


17,617 95 
45 34 


43,156 27 4 


146,901 97 
3,575 63 


150,581 24 
4,088 55 


75,027 55 
1,800 00 


75 

_3 


66 


4 
5 
6 


1,910 66 


23,495 11 


55,815 24 


46,512 79 


20,063 15 


17 


746 


17 


- 


7 


119,167 27 


88,157 11 


186,239 31 


159,432 77 


85,448 11 


115 


202 


4 


- 


8 


106,727 55 


5,400 00 4 


151,757 55 


139,317 39 


66,021 71 


49 


126 


- 


- 


9 


15,326 19 

54 39 

603 79 

3,909 57 


100 00 4 
11,250 00 


25,096 59 

164 14 

8,957 52 

15,580 99 


24,722 22 

166 73 

10,364 90 

3,793 47 


2,166 60 

8,097 55 
1,341 77 


7 

9 
3 


35 

7,142 
5 


_3 

854 
5 


_3 


10 
11 
12 
13 


21,508 31 


18,500 00 


64,277 60 


66,776 91 


31,029 78 


35 


f 12 

1 520 


} 356 


- 


14 


67 34 

3,625 10 
4,213 11 


37 01 


8,412 95 

8,194 64 
27,370 30 


9,657 01 

7,497 25 
24,339 97 


4,530 00 
1,982 38 


3 

1 


J 12 
I 1,227 
74 
114 


j 706 
28 


33 

_3 


15 

16 
17 


2,088 77 


- 


3,838 27 


3,340 58 


1,500 00 


2 


8 


_ 


- 


18 


29 63 


- 


1,576 74 


1,740 64 


1,447 26 


1 


I 12 

I 1,686 


} 390 


~ 


19 


- 


- 


547 49 


536 22 


40 00 


1 


_3 


_3 


_3 


20 


5,499 24 


12,767 75 


78,936 46 


77,908 05 


30,774 98 


24 


1,368 


38 


_ 


21 


1,577 62 


1,000 00 


9,925 57 


10,197 88 


3,328 00 


/ I 5 
I 6 


} « 


1 


" 


22 


7,326 34 


6,000 00 4 


7,690 34 


6,036 77 


2,190 00 


2 


10 


9 


- 


23 


100 16 


2,100 00 4 


9,279 43 


9,935 17 


7,370 50 


/ I 5 
\ 5 


} - 


_3 


_3 


24 


483 75 


- 


483 75 


426 80 


- 


- 


5 


5 


" 


25 


2 08 


1,000 00 


3,323 93. 


1,678 01 


144 00 


1 


52 


- 


" 


26 


- 


- 


21,557 10 


23,658 33 


14,979 77 


13 


- 


- 


- 


27 


- 


- 


13,993 99 


14,018 30 


7,353 75 


5 


_3 


_3 


_3 


28 
29 

30 
31 


151 85 
52 66 


- 


61,918 22 
5,550 94 


68,876 85 
6,180 84 


29,802 10 
4,174 00 


19 
3 


1,148 
1,451 


_3 

871 


_3 


1,092 07 


- 


1,848 17 


2,239 78 


839 50 


2 


7 


7 


- 


32 


224 16 


- 


9,584 71 


8,441 05 


3,020 00 


3 


{ »: 


} -' 


_a 


33 


33 93 
257 33 


- 


7,424 07 
1,177 53 


7,688 85 
1,717 00 


5,499 86 


3 


461 

12 


461 


- 


34 
35 



4 Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



Report for 16 months. 



120 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 


Incum- 
brances on 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 
and 






reported 


Real Estate 


Refunds 




Winchester 










1 


Home for Aged People in Winchester . 


$107,316 72 


- 


$5,823 40 


$532 00 


2 


Winchester Hebrew Benevolent Association 












Incorporated . . . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Winchester Visiting Nurse Association (oper- 












ating Winchester Hospital) (75 beds) 


441,010 06 


$69,000 00 


30,109 60 


83,141 32 




WiNTHROP 










4 


Association of the Hawthorne Club 


10,395 21 


5,000 00 


2,737 55 


97 77 


5 


Tifareth Israel Congregation of Winthrop * 










6 


Winthrop Community Hospital Aid Associa- 












tion, Incorporated, The .... 


1,478 28 


- 


955 61 


192 81 


7 


Winthrop Community Hospital, Incorporated 












(34 beds) . . . 


40,775 43 


11,029 20 


286 00 


35,910 76 


8 


Winthrop Visiting Nurse Association, Incor- 












porated . . ... 


513 25 


-3 


1,225 42 


1,877 94 


9 


Winthrop Young Men's Hebrew Association, 












Inc. ....... 


- 


~ 


125 00 


175 00 




WOBTJRN 










10 


Home for Aged Women in Woburn 


122,488 72 


- 


359 00 


1,454 25 


li 

12 


Winning Home ...... 

Woburn Charitable Association (operating 


54,486 81 


~ 


- 


- 




Charles Choate Memorial Hospital) (55 beds) 


246,996 90 


" 


6,782 94 


60,088 47 


13 


Young Men's Christian Association of Woburn 


41,957 27 


~ 


10,923 09 


1,917 00 




Worcester 










n 


Angora Orphan Aid Association, The . 


5,873 15 


- 


1,201 72 


- 


15 


Associated Charities of Worcester 


72,758 08 


- 


52,770 81 


1,144 39 


16 


Association of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy 


329,724 35 


- 


15,395 12 


33,606 39 


17 


Bais Hatveloh ...... 


11,293 29 


6,500 00 


1,630 95 


- 


18 


Board of the Swedish Lutheran Old People's 












Home of Worcester, Mass. 


146,750 01 


- 


11,926 58 


3,688 10 


19 


Fairlawn Hospital, Inc. (45 beds) 


215,229 00 


_3 


7,699 07 


54,421 69 


20 


Fraternit6 Franco-Americaine, Worcester 












Branch, Inc. ...... 


122 09 


— 


2,933 00 


- 


21 


Friendly House, Inc. .... 


263 45 


- 


4,209 92 


64 23 


22 


General Charles Devens Post Number 282, 












Department of Massachusetts, The Ameri- 












can Legion ...... 


890 24 


- 


479 96 


- 


23 


Girls' League for Service, Inc. 


473 38 


- 


2,200 00 


1,034 41 


24 


Girls' Welfare Society of Worcester, Inc. 


27,500 14 


- 


11,074 83 


1,914 52 


25 


Guild of St. Agnes of Worcester . 


142,599 98 


23,000 00 


24,016 02 


11,467 46 


26 


Home Association for Aged Colored People 


9,947 67 


- 


2,441 07 


- 


J 7 


Home for Aged Men in Worcester 


433,091 79 


- 


25,331 15 


6,570 39 


28 


Home for Aged Women in the City of Worces- 












ter, Trustees of .... . 


646,217 66 


- 


60 00 


2,312 95 


29 


Hospital Louis Pasteur (36 beds) 


40,920 84 


19,750 00 


4,742 00 


18,910 97 


JO 


Italian American War Veterans Association, 












Inc. ....... 


- 


- 


305 00 


110 00 


;i 


Jewish Home for Aged and Orphans of Wor- 












cester, Mass., Inc. ..... 


61,141 75 


4,800 00 


26,545 22 


1,591 00 


12 


Lithuanian Charitable Society, The 


6,451 97 


- 


3,172 48 


91 23 


13 


Little Franciscan Sisters of Mary 


163,657 67 


- 


6,597 71 


41,698 81 


14 


Maironis Association Inc. 1 










V, 


Memorial Home for the Blind, The 


149,672 13 


- 


4,500 00 


8,782 14 


in 


Memorial Hospital (215 beds) . . 


1,883,999 12 


- 


7,106 61 


216,354 34 


•;7 


North Worcester Aid Society 


12,712 32 


4,000 00 


2,709 00 


1,138 22 


$8 


Odd Fellows Home of Massachusetts . 


463,167 56 


- 


61,840 11 


8,803 66 


$9 


Quinsigamond Finnish Workingmen's Assn. 

Inc. i 
Rest Home Association .... 










to 


54,985 07 


15,350 00 


8,742 25 


15,334 52 


!1 


Rotary Club Education Fund of Worcester, The 


804 81 


- 


454 00 


- 


12 


St. Anne's French Canadian Orphanage 


359,131 18 


151,156 87 


35,581 35 


38,238 54 


13 


St. Vincent Hospital of Worcester, Massa- 












chusetts (250 beds) .... 


700,162 06 


185,000 00 


23,969 26 


210,546 92 


11 


Southern Worcester County Health Asso- 












ciation, Incorporated .... 


24,647 22 


6,250 00 


3,137 20 


20,849 18 


15 


Temporary Home and Day Nursery Society 


142,151 55 


- 


10,850 50 


1,786 45 


16 


United Jewish Charities, Inc., The 


2,803 81 


_3 


17,750 00 


216 67 


17 


Worcester Animal Rescue League 


21,922 37 


- 


1,628 25 


1,535 35 


18 


Worcester Boys' Club .... 


714,488 01 


- 


38,600 00 


5,628 20 



- None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued 



121 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 
and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 
aided ex- 
clusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$3,049 13 



3,049 13 



13,750 00 
20,000 00 



6,555 00' 
2,383 28 



500 00' 
1,100 00 



6,020 00 



8,035 97 

500 00' 
10,396 92 



7,635 96 
4,382 10 



1,277 18 



18,670 00 

725 00 
150 00 



$12,611 94 

106,586 15 

2,884 44 

1,138 42 

36,698 81 

3,134 94 

300 00 



6,418 22 
2,203 92 



70,980 73 
12,874 05 



1,201 72 
57,526 22 
57,676 13 

1,630 95 

11,740 89 
64,441 14 

2,933 00 
4,274 15 



479 96 

3,259 41 

13,894 24 

34,918 39 

2,441 07 

55,206 02 

43,798 88 

25,063 98 

415 00 

28,795 06 

3,390 24 

58,393 57 

25,453 34 

276,928 56 

4,127 73 

78,296 90 



21,184 17 

878 00 

73,837 10 

234,616 70 

24,321 55 

36,189 02 

18,444 62 

4,575 13 

50,604 19 



$9,711 33 

103,069 35 

2,333 84 

1,050 38 

40,119 21 

3,274 04 

300 00 



5,469 58 
1,899 69 



67,436 05 
8,559 89 



1,850 00 
56,205 98 
42,513 64 

1,382 17 

11,692 52 
66,406 04 

2,813 00 
4,010 70 



2,979 26 
13,870 30 

24,789 15 

2,135 20 

18,288 66 

28,432 69 
24,764 94 

524 71 

20,985 58 

502 09 

41,065 81 

18,708 34 

308,956 99 

12,144 42 

70,220 20 



21,271 90 

3,780 01 

54,300 52 

191,233 38 

24,260 85 

17,571 26 

18,263 38 

2,718 09 

50,672 53 



$5,083 65 


6 


40,543 16 


33 


694 28 


5 


16,380 67 


18 


2,465 41 


2 


1,914 16 


2 


22,786 33 


25 


5,360 50 


3 


12,572 02 

4,014 41 

148 92 


9 
6 

1 


3,633 27 


f l 5 
I 2 
26 


25,148 21 


2,393 31 


6 


1,156 00 


1 


6,228 04 


6 


6,465 90 


20 


546 75 
7,233 79 


2 
9 


12,440 77 


15 


9,541 09 


9,158 37 


9 


6,384 27 


18 


6,980 96 
127,344 64 


8 
156 


25,575 31 


/ 2^ 
1 33 


7,940 57 


12 


14,271 90 


28 


65,975 06 


90 


7,213 89 


4 


7,632 47 


10 


6,138 00 

1,040 00 

11,097 42 


6 

3 

40 



22 

2,471 
180 

12 

942 
2,299 



1,686 
122 
850 



2,442 

494 

50 



1,439 
140 



425 

202 
327 

72 

1,254 

9 

38 

44 
435 



49 
125 

449 

31 
13,505 



163 



60 

185 

5,099 

252 

15 

529 

227 

4,475 

5,386 



16 


_ 


- 


8 


153 


- 


90 


_3 


- 


-3 


431 


_3 


-3 


_3 


14 


_ 


270 


~ 


2,428 
120 
50 


502 
7 


2 


- 


9 


- 


_3 




_3 


_3 


-3 


37 


252 


- 


653 


95 


37 


- 


39 


- 


37 
125 
46 


50 
5 


3 

4,926 


- 


163 


- 


4 


_3 


9 


_3 


177 


- 


252 


- 


249 


238 


227 

_3 


56 


~ 


- 



Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



6 Animals. 



122 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 


Worcester — Con. 
Worcester Children's Friend Society 1 










2 


Worcester City Missionary Society 


$58,083 36 


_3 


$1,533 38 


- 


3 


Worcester Civic League .... 


12,342 80 


_3 


1,200 00 


- 


4 


Worcester County Association for the Blind, 
Inc. ....... 


5,319 25 


_ 


472 00 


$3,885 16 


5 


Worcester Employment Society, The . 


81,682 41 


- 


7,060 15 


3,926 58 


6 

7 
8 


Worcester Garden City, Inc. 

Worcester Girl's Club House Corporation 

Worcester Hahnemann Hospital (100 beds) . 


53 32 

83,271 57 

726,730 74 


$10,500 00 


3,500 00 
9,000 00 
5,264 05 


2,251 14 
103,815 55 


9 


Worcester Lions Club Charitable Corporation 


1,046 55 


- 


571 90 


585 73 


10 
11 


Worcester Society for District Nursing 
Worcester Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals, The 


253,334 49 

3,286 54 


; 


57,277 84 
434 64 


37,591 08 


12 


Worcester Swedish Charitable Association 


25,828 23 


- 


8,347 52 


44 00 


13 


Young Men's Christian Association 


989,594 09 


5,000 00 


70,593 75 


144,163 63 


14 


Young Women's Christian Association of 
Worcester ...... 

Yarmouth 


805,288 23 


15,000 00 


31,098 75 


60,412 33 


15 


Friday Club 


8,742 13 


- 


58 00 


513 93 


16 


South Yarmouth Woman's Club, Inc. . 
Headquarters Outside of Commonwealth. 


2,701 59 


" 


165 70 


569 04 


17 


Albanian-American School of Agriculture 


64,473 03 


- 


35,238 69 


- 


18 


American Association of Hospital Social 
Workers, Inc. ..... 


6,068 30 


_ 


13,603 15 


_ 


19 


American Baptist Foreign Mission Society . 


10,564,714 64 


- 


873,546 42 


20,337 22 


20 


American Peace Society .... 


16,746 07 


- 


46,094 45 


1,716 99 


21 
22 

23 


Boy's Club Federation, Inc. 
Palou Reconstruction Union, The 
Woman's American Baptist Foreign Mission 
Society ....... 

Totals 


10,121 93 
5,434 02 

2,119,743 29 


-3 


62,956 00 
611 28 

521,496 01 


120 21 
6,426 56 




$287,348,069 45 


$10,067,293 32 


$16,915,826 77 


$23,344,658 91 



None. 1 No report. 2 Organizations aided. 3 Not stated. 

* Restricted to capital. 5 Paid officers. 



Pt.pl. 

Charitable Corporations 



123 



Concluded. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 

aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 
aided 
exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 




$3,774 96 


$121 15 


$5,429 49 


$3,888 41 


$3,360 00 


/ 25 
I 2 


22 

_3 


\ -• 


8 


1 
2 


4 37 


- 


1,204 37 


1,261 57 


530 00 


2 


r 22 

I 75 


} » 


19 


3 


405 39 


_ 


4,762 55 


2,050 81 


220 00 


1 


10 


_3 


- 


4 


4,154 14 


1,250 00 ; 


15,169 73 


14,511 18 


1,797 25 


2 


/ 182 

\ 147 

936 

1,183 

2,057 


} "' 


54 


5 


1,536 47 
10,180 11 


29,417 10 < 


3,500 00 

11,516 84 

114,159 71 


3,435 06 

10,387 68 

114,864 17 


1,879 43 

7,025 64 

37,921 87 


1 

14 
38 


_3 

83 


- 


6 
7 
8 


58 50 


- 


1,216 13 


432 99 


- 




/ 3 2 
\ 50 
14,540 


1 50 


93 


9 


13,220 29 


8,948 66 4 


108,225 53 


108,953 97 


72,866 48 


59 


5,525 


8,979 


10 


80 00 


- 


514 64 


608 57 


300 00 


15 


- 


- 


- 


11 


- 


- 


8,391 52 


8,442 50 


200 00 


{ 1' 


} 310 


- 


75 


12 


4,045 00 


/ 54,471 16< 
{ 50,885 85 


J 262,773 01 


260,898 76 


109,924 20 


80 


7,061 


- 


_3 


13 


14,329 31 


111,515 68 


105,840 39 


107,245 12 


52,587 23 


50 


_3 


_3 


_3 


14 


98 64 


280 00 


950 57 


860 15 


_ 


_ 


{ T 


} - 3 


4 


15 


120 00 


- 


854 74 


868 63 


62 87 


1 


102 


- 


2 


16 


558 82 


24,166 27 4 


35,797 51 


35,523 35 


_3 


{ '-• 


} 1 


" 


- 


17 


- 


- 


13,603 15 


12,864 55 


6,364 17 


3 


- 


- 


- 


18 


498,124 00 


120,000 00 


1,720,622 52 


1,677,400 92 


1,013,256 45 


/ 55 
\ 45 


} - 


_3 


_3 


19 


481 29 


- 


58,292 73 


47,463 06 


27,811 52 


f 15 

1 5 

12 


} 


- 


- 


20 


92 46 


- 


65,139 25 
611 28 


72,020 69 
31 10 


45,288 94 


2772 
200 


_3 


~ 


21 
22 


109,283 63 


15,428 16 


600,022 02 


404,306 33 


-3 


/ 45 

I 213 


} " 


_3 


_3 


23 


$9,023,121 57 


($5,077,568 91*\ 

184,877,874 90 j 


S52, 162,287 95 


349,138,283 08 


316,186,683 90 


/ 328 5 
1 20,259 


6,7202\ 
3,006,383 6 J 


1,612,296 ' 


54,847 





6 Total includes: 1,861,110 individuals, 958,961 animals, 2,058 visits, 1,160 memberships 

7 Total includes: 735,826 individuals, 836,080 animals, 390 visits, 40,000 attendance. 



183,094 attendance. 



124 P.D. 17 

Part III. 
THE CITY AND TOWN INFIRMARIES 

AND 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 

Francis Bardwell, Inspector of Infirmaries. 
Laws Relating to Infirmaries. 

{General Laws, Chapter 47, as amended by Chapter 203, Acts of 1927.) 

For the information of boards of public welfare, superintendents of infirmaries 
and others concerned, certain laws relating to infirmaries are here summarized. 

The Department of Public Welfare is required to visit annually all city and 
town infirmaries, and to include in its annual report a statement of their condition 
and management, with its suggestions and recommendations relative thereto. 
(General Laws, ch. 121, sect. 7.) 

The master of every infirmary must keep a register, in the form prescribed by 
the Department of Public Welfare, of the names of the persons received or com- 
mitted, the cities or towns to which they belong, and the dates of their reception 
and discharge. (General Laws, ch. 47, sect. 8.) 

Every inmate of an infirmary able to work shall be kept diligently employed in 
labor. If he is idle and does not perform such reasonable task as is assigned, or if 
he is stubborn and disorderly, he shall be punished according to the orders and 
regulations established by the directors. (General Laws, ch. 117, sects. 21 and 
22. See also opinion of Attorney-General given to State Board of Charity Novem- 
ber 21, 1904.) 

The only children who can be lawfully supported in a city or town infirmary for 
a period of more than two months are:' (1) those who are so defective in body or 
mind as to make their retention in an infirmary desirable; (2) those who are under 
two years of age; and (3) those who are under three years of age, with mothers who 
are infirmary inmates and suitable persons to aid in taking care of them. In cases 
of failure of boards of public welfare to remove children illegally in infirmaries, the 
Department of Public Welfare is required to remove them and provide for them 
otherwise, at the expense of the city or town concerned. (General Laws, ch. 117, 
sects. 36-38.) 

Provision is made that tramps and vagrants, as well as criminals, shall be con- 
fined in separate and distinct quarters in all infirmaries and shall not be permitted 
to associate or communicate with other inmates. It should be noted also that 
tramps and vagrants, if physically able, shall parforna labor of sons kind, and 
shall be lodged under conditions prescribed by the State Departmant of Public 
Health. (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 20.) 

The Department of Public Welfare is authorized to advise with and assist local 
boards of public welfare in preparation of plans for infirmary buildings. (General 
Laws, ch. 121, sect. 38.) 

Inspection of Infirmaries. 

As required by law every infirmary has been visited once by the department's 
Inspector. Seventeen (17) have been visited twice, 4 three times, and 1 four 
times. Conferences have been held with various municipal officers — mayors of 
cities, local boards of public welfare, and special committees — concerning matters 
of importance relative to the management and administration of infirmaries or 
for discussion of improvements or new construction. There are in Massachusetts 
122 infirmaries which cared for 9,244 inmates during the past municipal year. 

Infirmaries Closed. 

The infirmary at Groton was closed and the inmates provided for at the Fitch- 
burg infirmary. 

Recommendations Made. 

Charlton. — That there is still an urgent need for hospital accommodations 
not only because of the need of caring for those who suffer from chronic illness, 



Pt. III. 125 

but to relieve present congestion, so that no one will be obliged to sleep above the 
second floor. 

Dedham. — That additional rooms should be provided and suggestion that a 
hospital ward was needed. 

Hingham. — The attention of the local board of public welfare was called to 
the condition of a man suffering from epilepsy and a recommendation made that 
the patient be committed to the state hospital at Monson. 

Manchester. — That the Infirmary Register should be kept at the Infirmary. 

Marlborough . — That a patient be examined to ascertain if he is suffering from 
tuberculosis and if this is found to be the case, asking for his transfer to a sana- 
torium. 

Northbridge. — That the electricity for lighting be installed, even if it necessi- 
tated the maintenance of a small home plant as has been successfully tried at Barn- 
stable and North Brookfield. 

Quincy. — That considering the crowded condition of the infirmary and that 
several patients who should be cared for at the infirmary are boarded either at the 
State Infirmary or other infirmaries, that some plan should be undertaken either 
to increase the size of the present building or to build a new one. As the present 
wooden building has been built nearly, if not quite, fifty years; as rooms on the 
third floor are in almost constant use, it would seem advisable to consider the 
erection of a new building to suit the needs of a growing city and to take care of 
its increasing infirmary population. 

Rockland. — That a woman inmate be examined with a view of having her com- 
mitted to a hospital for the insane. 

Springfield. — The presence of a child in residence at the infirmary for a period 
beyond the time allowed by law was called to the attention of the local department 
of public welfare and a request that this case be at once removed and placed. 

Uxbridge. — That if possible plans be made so that an aged man now at the 
infirmary may be kept on, and in case he was not a settled case he might remain 
as a boarder by place of settlement. 

Construction — New and Contemplated. 

Attleboro. — No move has been made, either to erect a new infirmary or to 
renovate the present building. 

Barnstable. — The addition of a new wing and complete renovation of the older 
building giving a total of 22 rooms with four bathrooms and two large sun rooms. 
Cost $20,000. 

Beverly. — Extensive alterations to provide a more conveniently planned insti- 
tution with the heating plant removed from the building; repairs still in progress. 

Dedham. — Extensive repairs are to be made. 

Leominster. — With the exception of the central portion of the old building a 
complete demolition and the construction of two new wings, with four large sun 
rooms and a modern kitchen, increasing the inmate capacity to serve the city's 
needs for future housing. Cost $43,100. 

Maiden. — Construction of a one-story brick building in process — probable 
date of completion, July, 1930. 

Stoneham. — New construction providing two large sun parlors and general 
renovation of the bathrooms and sleeping rooms. 

Webster. — Extensive remodelling with a new dining-room, a new laundry, a 
men's smoking room and additional sleeping quarters. 

Although matters have not come to the decisive point as yet, it is probable that 
additional accommodations must be provided in the following infirmaries: Brock- 
ton, Holyoke, Lawrence, New Bedford, and Quincy. To this list might possibly 
be added Marlborough, where the capacity has been reached on several recent 
occasions, and Westfield, where a new house is needed. 

It is pertinent for the Department to urgently recommend that in all infirmaries 
built of wood no inmate other than the able-bodied be housed above the second 
floor. It is hoped that in all future construction this point shall be kept in mind 
and if possible sleeping rooms for all inmates will not be planned above the second 
floor. 



126 P.D. 17. 

Improvements. 

The following major improvements and repairs, other than those recorded above, 
have been made in the various infirmaries: 

Adams, new floor coverings in dining-room, kitchen, and hall. Athol, new 
cement floor in laundry, kitchen completely renovated, floors painted, and com- 
plete renovation in three bedrooms and dining-room. Braintree, interior painting 
and papering, repairs to plumbing system. Brockton, addition to men's smoking 
room and furnishings for same at a cost of 83,000. Billerica, barn shingled and 
new water pipe installed. Brookline, new piping for steam heating and plumbing. 
Cohasset, new heater. Chicopee, electric refrigerator, new bathtubs all over, 
buildings painted, inside painting and general repairs, at a cost of §4,204.49. 
Charlton Home Farm Association, smoking room and porch (8673.59), lightning 
rods, all buildings (8475.00), general repairs (8234.93). auto truck (8700). Doug- 
las, buildings painted. East Bridgewater, new roof on house. Falmouth, barn 
shingled, electric wiring and general repairs ($250.12). Grafton, electric refriger- 
ator. Haverhill, repairs and painting (81,000), three-box refrigerator with Frigid- 
aire equipment (82.500), new water heater for laundry, new bath in nurses' 
quarters. Holyoke, general repairs, hay barn painted, steam pipes replaced, metal 
ceilings, etc. Ipswich, new piazza. Lynn, upstairs kitchen, office and dispensary 
renovated. Lowell, new rest house for men in out-patient department, new sun- 
porch women's hospital, improved plumbing in laundry, sun-porch men's hospital, 
new cement run-way to facilitate handling wheel-chair patients. 450 feet of new 
fire hose and three large extinguishers provided, radio for female ward. Lawrence, 
entire male department of infirmary painted, new entrance to female ward, im- 
provements in nurses' quarters and lecture room for nurses arranged. Mansfield, 
renovation in warden's quarters, two new bedrooms planned. Manchester, cess- 
pool and drainage (8977). Methuen, electric refrigerator. Marblehead, build- 
ings painted outside and in. Medford, men's smoking room renovated, linoleum on 
most of the floors downstairs. North Brookfield, connection made with Warren 
Electric Company, thus doing away with the individual plant. Milford, new oil 
heater (8785), extensive improvements in the plumbing and general renovation 
at total cost of $1,608.86. Middleboro, new heater given by the Trustees of the 
Pierce Fund (81 ,400) , also, by the town, a new piazza and ordinary repairs. Natick, 
shingling barn. Xorthbridge, new engine for the water pump. Xorth Adams, 
general renovation of house and barns at a cost of 81,034.69. North Attleboro, 
new furnishing, cesspool and drain, eight rooms painted and repairs at barn. Nan- 
tucket, general repairs. North Andover, outside painting and shingling, general 
repairs (81,113.95). New Bedford, new granolithic walk from street to infirmary, 
hospital painted, new kitchen equipment. Pittsfield, interior renovations ($437.18) . 
Provincetown, new fire escape (S300). Oxford, electric refrigerator. Quincy, 
new gas range, water laid on to men's smoking room, women's dining-room planned 
and furnished, general repairs costing 81,000. Randolph, new screens, repairs to 
piazza, papering and painting at a cost of S450, also a new refrigerator. Rockport, 
general exterior repairs and painting (8891.59). Saugus, steam heat installed 
(81,025). South Hadley, new heaters installed. Spencer, new piazza, barn and 
sheds shingled. Stoughton, buildings painted and a new washing machine pur- 
chased ($471.76). Salem, extensive exterior repairs and some rooms renovated. 
Sutton, new cattle linter and improvements in infirmary (81,000). Somerville. 
electric refrigerator, new fence about the property, new furniture, heating and 
plumbing repairs. Springfield, extensive repairs to the heating S3*stem and new 
fire escapes. Taunton, interior repairs amounting to 8992.52. Winchendon, new 
heater (8700) . Weymouth, new garage. Wakefield, new oil heater and chimney 
(81,319.94). Westford, new farm machinery. Worcester, installation of sprin- 
kler system at a cost of $9,559, two new bathrooms, fire pipe at a cost of $712.07, 
additional farm machinerv, tractors, etc., the total cost of improvements being 
$16,820.74. 

Infirmary Visitors. 

The infirmary visitors are local residents, giving their services under the Com- 
missioner's appointment. Those in office now are: Adams, Mrs. W. C. Plunkett; 
Amesbury, Mrs. George W. Crowther; Andover, Mrs. Frank L. Brigham; Athol, 
Miss Hattie M. French; Boston, Miss Theresa M. Lally; Charlton, Mrs. Edgar 



Pt. III. 127 

W. Preble; Easthampton, Mrs. George L. Munn; Easton, Mrs. Myrtie A. Spooner; 
Fall River, Mrs. Joseph E. Barre, Mrs. Jonathan T. Lincoln and Mrs. Charles H. 
Warner; Falmouth, Mrs. Alfred F. Kelley; Gloucester, Mrs. J. E. Anderson; 
Greenfield, Mrs. Henry F. Nash; Holyoke, Mrs. John M. James; Lancaster, Miss 
Mary Belle Bailey; Lawrence, Mrs. Lewis A. Foye; Maiden, Mrs. Harvey L. 
Boutwell, Mrs. Catherine A. Lovejoy and Mrs. Ellen Woolfson; Manchester, Mrs. 
Grace L. Porter; Marlborough, Mrs. L. H. Tourtellotte; Milton, Mrs. William 
H. Sias; Monson, Mrs. Herbert M. Smith; Montague, Mrs. Richard R. Lyman; 
Nantucket, Mrs. Josephine S. Brooks and Miss Ella F. Sj'lvia; Natick, Mrs. 
James E. White; Newburyport, Mrs. Frederick Tigh; Newton, Mrs. Winnifred 
W. Hills and Mrs. Arthur W. Chamberlain; North Adams, Mrs. Lida A. Kimball 
and Miss lone Northrup; Northampton, Miss Clara C. Allen; North Attleborough, 
Mrs. George A. Livingston; Pittsfield, Miss Mary C. Galbraith and Miss Frances 
D. Robbins; Provincetown, Mrs. Ruth S. Snow; Randolph, Mrs. Daniel F. Flynn; 
Somerville, Mrs. Marguerite E. Kauler; Springfield, Mrs. Wendell S. Mowry and 
Mrs. Mildred T. Parsons; Ware, Mrs. Andrew Campion; Warren, Mrs. Edna 
Deland; Waltham, Mrs. Pryor Fulton; Westborough, Mrs. Andrew B. Adams; 
Winchendon, Mrs. Frank B. Spalter; Worcester, Miss Nellie E. Barrett and Mrs. 
Charles F. Darling. 

Reports from Infirmaries. 
Tabulated information relating to the various infirmaries follows. There has 
been a reorganization of the Charlton Town Farm Association, twenty-four towns 
now being united in this joint infirmary. A list of these towns will be found in the 
tabulation. 



128 



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132 P.D. 17. 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 

Numbers Relieved. 

The following information covers public relief, whether rendered in institutions or 
outside, and aid rendered by all public agencies, whether State or local. 

The tables given below are arranged to show numbers relieved and their analysis 
by age, sex and nativity. The tabulations are concluded by figures for cost of all 
relief. 

Table I shows the number supported or relieved by the several cities and towns 
during the year beginning April 1, 1928, and ending March 31, 1921. All persons 
are included, regardless of settlement. The total number receiving aid in any 
form, exclusive of vagrants and wayfarers, was 149,523. Of this number, 12,358 
were aided in institutions and 137,165 — the remainder — outside, either in pri- 
vate families or in their own homes. Of the persons aided in institutions, 8,100 
were relieved in the various city and town infirmaries, leaving 4,258 who were 
cared for in other institutions. It should be noted that certain cities which have 
city hospitals have not reported persons aided therein under "poor relief." To in- 
clude these would add approximately twenty-two thousand to the persons aided 
in "other institutions." Of the outside aid, 3,465 cases were aided in private 
families other than their own, while 133,700 were reported as having been aided in 
their own homes. This last figure comprises practically all city and town aid 
usually known as local public outdoor relief, including that under Chapter 118 of 
the General Laws. 

There is an increase of 520 over the preceding year in the number aided in in- 
stitutions, and an increase of 19,480 in the number aided outside. 

Table II supplies the same data for persons aided or relieved by the Common- 
wealth as are shown in Table I for local relief. In addition to aid rendered directly 
by the Commonwealth, this table includes also all those cases included in Table I, 
in which the relief has been rendered by cities and towns in the first instance and 
reimbursed by the Commonwealth as required by law. This table shows 34,899 
persons aided by the Commonwealth, an increase of 2,265 over 1928. Of this 
number, the aid in 30,214 cases was first rendered by the several cities and towns. 
The remaining 4,685 cases were aided by the Commonwealth; 3,559 of them at 
the State Infirmary; 224 in the Infirmary Ward at the State Farm; and 902 at 
the Massachusetts Hospital School. 

Table III affords a rapid glance at the movement of population in the dependent 
group during the year under analysis. Thus it appears that 72,882 cases repre- 
sented approximately the total number of persons receiving aid April 1, 1928. 
About 77 per cent of these were receiving relief locally. During the year 81,326 
new cases were admitted to relief; 23 per cent of this figure were aided either di- 
rectly or through reimbursement by the Commonwealth. The persons who passed 
out of care during that same period number 76,628; viz., city and town cases, 
57,750; state cases, 18,878. Those in this total released by death number 2,641 
and 2,738 persons were transferred. At the close of the year, therefore, the cities 
and towns had 61,559 persons in receipt of relief, and the Commonwealth had 
16,021, making a total of 77,580. 

Table IV begins classification of the whole number of persons aided, and shows 
the analysis by color, nativity and sex. Of the 154,208 persons so aided, 74,600 
were males and 79,608 females. The colored races furnished only 3,477 of the 
whole number. The native born whites — 114,842 — number more than three 
times the foreign born of the white races, the 34,461 of this latter group repre- 
senting a proportionate increase of 16 per cent over last year. The females of the 
total native born outnumber the males by only 1.8 per cent, while of the total 
foreign born the females outnumber the males by 24.4 per cent. 

Table V gives a further interesting analysis of the native-born persons aided 
during the year classified by parent nativity. 

The parents of 41,254 were both native; 50,869 were children of foreign-born 
parents; 22,317 were of parents one of whom was foreign born or unknown; while 
the nativity of parents in 3,879 cases remained unascertained. It appears from 
this table, therefore, that of the 154,208 persons receiving aid in Massachusetts 
in the year ending March 31, 1929, there were at least 85,878 who were either 
foreign born or were of the first generation in our citizenship. 



Pt. III. 133 

By Table VI it appears that of the 154,208 cases aided, 15,174 were under five; 
68,513 were under fifteen; 85,134, or 55 per cent, including the above, were under 
twenty; 51,327, or 33 per cent, were between twenty and sixty; and 16,306, or 
10.5 per cent, were over that age. The ages of 1,444 were unknown. 

Among the poor persons relieved are always a considerable number of mental 
defectives who for one reason or another have not been committed and are there- 
fore not cared for in the special institutions, such as the asylums for the insane, 
maintained for that purpose. In regard to this class it is to be noted further that 
since no court has passed upon their mental condition, their classification here is 
made only because, in the opinion of the respective authorities making the returns, 
there is no doubt of their defect. Table VII affords a rough classification into three 
groups, according to the nature of the defect, and a division by sex. The total 
number thus cared for was 331, namely, 188 males and 143 females. Two hundred 
seventy-one (271) of these cases were relieved by the cities and towns; the remain- 
ing 60 having no settlement, were aided at the expense of the Commonwealth. 
One hundred sixty-one (161) of the whole number were classed as "insane," mostly 
the senile and mildly insane to be found in the infirmaries. This total includes 91 
males and 70 females. One hundred twenty-four (124) were called "idiotic," 
namely, 67 males and 57 females. The "epileptics" totaled 46, of whom 30 were 
males and 16 were females. 

Table VIII calls attention more pointedly to the sex and the nature of discharge 
from relief of those persons who passed out of aid during the year. Of the 76,628 
cases so dismissed, 38,705 were males and 37,923 were females. Forty-seven per 
cent (47 per cent) or 36,468, were released to the care of relatives or friends. About 
3.5 per cent, or 2,738, of the whole number were transferred to other institutions, 
while 45 per cent of the aggregate were discharged without relatives or friends or 
other authorities agreeing to look after them. The great majority in this last 
group were persons assisted through illness, after which they became self-support- 
ing again. 

As appears from Table IX the foreign born who were receiving public relief 
during the year numbered 35 ; 009, or 22.6 per cent of the entire number of persons 
aided. This percentage is 8.8 per cent less than the proportion of foreign born in 
the population generally, — 31.4 per cent. Canada furnished 9,725 of this num- 
ber; England and Wales, 2,190; Germany, 324; Ireland, 6,232; Italy, 4,618; 
Russia and Poland, 3,262; Scandinavia, 466; Scotland, 595; and all other coun- 
tries, 7,597. 

Table X shows the percentage of the various classes aided to the whole number 
relieved. Thus, of the 154,208 persons relieved, 77.37 per cent were settled cases, 
receiving their assistance out of local taxes; 22.63 per cent were unsettled, and 
though relieved by the respective cities and towns in the first instance in a majority 
of cases were ultimately aided out of the state tax. As to the place in which relief 
was given, 11.05 per cent of the total were aided in institutions, namely, 5.25 per 
cent in .infirmaries, 3.04 per cent in state institutions; and 2.76 per cent in other 
institutions, mostly under private management. Outdoor relief, designated as aid 
"outside," was given in 88.95 per cent of all the cases. Most of these, namely 
86.70 per cent, were relieved in their own homes. Aid was given in private families 
other than the recipient's own — mostly boarded cases — in 2.25 per cent instances. 
Percentages of age show that 56.36 per cent were minors, 32.13 per cent were be- 
tween the ages of twenty-one and sixty, and 10.57 per cent were sixty or over. 
The ages of .94 per cent were unknown. Sexes differ slightly, males rating 48.38 
per cent and females 51.62 per cent. 

The number of colored persons was very small, totaling only 2.63 per cent. 

By reason of thoroughgoing classification in the care of defectives, the per- 
centage of those mentally deficient persons still cared for as poor relief cases is 
exceedingly small, and tends always to decrease. The mental condition of all the 
cases aided shows, on analysis, that 99.79 per cent were sane, .10 per cent were 
insane, .08 per cent were idiotic, and .03 per cent were epileptic. The proportion 
of sane persons in last year's returns was 99.77 per cent. 

It is of further interest to view at a glance the numerical relationship to the whole 
population of the persons relieved at public expense as appears in Table XI, which 
exhibits the number of each class in every thousand of the population of the Com- 



134 P.D. 17. 

monwealth on a basis of the census of 1925. Thus it is shown that in each thou- 
sand of the population there were 37.21 indigent persons relieved at public expense. 
Of these 18.00 were males and 19.21 were females. The native born numbered 
28.55 in the thousand; foreign born, 8.45; native born of foreign parentage, 12.27 
and those of unknown nativity, .21. The proportion of vagrants reported was 2.1 
in the thousand. 

Cost of Poor Relief. 
The funds laid out by the several cities and towns for all poor relief within their 
respective fiscal years are shown in Table XII. The aggregate is classified as 
"ordinary," or maintenance, and "extraordinary," or special. Together with the 
ordinary outlays are shown the receipts on account of maintenance, and the differ- 
ence, set out under "net ordinary expenditures." The ordinary outlay is classified 
as expenses in institutions and outside. This subdivision follows the classifica- 
tions in Table I regarding the nature and the place of aid. The grand total in 
Table XII shows that an aggregate of $13,389,936.44 was laid out by the several 
cities and towns. Of this sum, $12,582,359.43 was ordinary outlay, or maintenance ; 
the remainder, or $807,577.01, was expended for sundry improvements, all of it 
at the city and town infirmaries. Of the money expended for maintenance, 
$2,301,061.49 was expended for infirmary care and $881,280.14 for relief in other 
institutions. Care in private families took $526,894.95, and relief in the recipients' 
own homes, i.e., outdoor poor relief, totaled $8,151,546.66. The cost of adminis- 
tration, including salary and office expenses of the local public welfare boards, but 
exclusive of institution administration, came to $721,576.19. The total receipts 
on account of ordinary expenditures were $2,204,049.16 — classified as receipts on 
account of institutions, $472,991.23; and all other, $1,731,057.93. This latter 
portion of the receipts is made up mostly of reimbursements by cities and towns 
ultimately liable and from the state treasury is unsettled cases. Subtracting re- 
ceipts leaves $10,378,310.27 as the net ordinary outlay. 

In Table XIII the analysis shown for cities and towns by Table XII is carried 
out for cases aided out of the State funds. Of the $2,519,489.59 expended for this 
purpose, $2,473,461.24 was on account of ordinary expenditures, laid out as follows: 
At the State Infirmary, $501,556.53; at the State Farm, $41,221.28; at the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital School, $102,397.37, and all other expenditures outside of insti- 
tutions, $1,828,286.06. Extraordinary expenditures totaled $46,028.35 — all ex- 
pended for special improvements at the several institutions just enumerated. In- 
asmuch as it is impossible to trace institution expenditures to the separate indi- 
viduals receiving the aid, the figures set out under the State tables of cost are 
arrived at by taking from net cost of maintenance that proportion which the 
average number relieved in the institution bears to the average inmate population 
of the institution. 

In Table XIV State and local outlays are added, showing that of the $13,705,- 
376.87 expended for public poor relief, $12,851,771.51 was for ordinary outlays, 
of which $3,354,525.58 went for institutional relief and $9,497,245.93 was for relief 
outside. The total of extraordinary expenditures was $853,605.36. 



Pt. III. 135 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 











Aggregate 


In Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND TOWNS 




















In In- 


In Other 




In 


In 






Total 


firmary 


Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


Private 
Families 


Own 
Homes 


Abington .... 


177 


8 




8 


169 


12 


157 


Acton . 








12 


2 


— 


2 


10 


6 


4 


Acushnet 








383 


21 


_ 


21 


362 


5 


357 


Adams 








572 


19 


16 


3 


553 


8 


545 


Agawam 








143 


6 


- 


6 


137 


6 


131 


Alford 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Amesbury 








454 


25 


20 


5 


429 


— 


429 


Amherst 








73 


8 


— 


8 


65 


3 


62 


Andover 








196 


14 


11 


3 


182 


3 


179 


Arlington 








298 


8 


— 


8 


290 


14 


276 


Ashburnham 


1 






84 


5 


— 


5 


79 


3 


76 


Ashby 








12 


1 


1 


- 


11 


1 


10 


Ashfield 








8 


— 


— 


— 


8 


— 


8 


Ashland 








38 


5 


3 


2 


33 


5 


28 


Athol . 








253 


26 


23 


3 


227 


20 


207 


Attleboro 








522 


20 


17 


3 


502 


13 


489 


Auburn 1 








139 


2 


_ 


2 


137 


3 


134 


Avon . 








77 


3 


- 


3 


74 


- 


74 


Ayer . 








62 


6 


5 


1 


56 


1 


55 


Barnstable 








324 


25 


19 


6 


299 


25 


274 


Barre . 








16 


5 


5 


— 


11 


2 


9 


Becket 








17 


1 




1 


16 


_ 


16 


Bedford 








8 


1 


_ 


1 


7 


_ 


7 


Belchertown 








7 ■ 


3 


2 


1 


4 


4 




Bellingham 








32 


2 


_ 


2 


30 




30 


Belmont 








77 


4 


— 


4 


73 


8 


65 


Berkley 








10 


- 


- 


- 


10 


_ 


10 


Berlin > 








16 


1 


— 


1 


15 


4 


11 


Bernardston 








6 


- 


- 




6 


1 


5 


Beverly 








1,143 


85 


55 


30 


1,058 


22 


1,036 


Billerica 








118 


3 


2 


1 


115 


10 


105 


Blackstone 








72 


— 


_ 


_ 


72 


_ 


72 


Blandford 








1 


1 


_ 


1 




_ 




Bolton 








9 


1 


_ 


1 


8 


3 


5 


Boston 








23,325 


1,823 


1,712 


111 


21,502 


1,023 


20,479 


Bourne 








55 


— 


— 


— 


55 


4 


51 


Boxborough 








2 


2 


_ 


2 


_ 




_ 


Boxford 








3 


3 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Boylston ! 








14 


1 


1 




13 


_ 


13 


Braintree 








352 


28 


22 


6 


324 


29 


295 


Brewster 








35 


2 


_ 


2 


33 


4 


29 


Bridgewater 








124 


8 


4 


4 


116 


5 


111 


Brimfield 








11 


— 






11 


1 


10 


Brockton 








2,867 


172 


152 


20 


2,695 


64 


2,631 


Brookfield » 








10 


1 


_ 


1 


9 


2 


7 


Brookline 








491 


23 


14 


9 


468 


_ 


468 


Buckland 








16 


— 


_ 




16 


6 


10 


Burlington 








24 


1 


- 


1 


23 




23 


Cambridge 








5,077 


810 


177 


633 


4,267 


48 


4,219 


Canton 








66 


1 


_ 


1 


65 


13 


52 


Carlisle 










_ 


_ 










Carver 








38 


1 


_ 


1 


37 


6 


31 


Charlemont 








4 


1 


_ 


1 


3 




3 


Charlton i 








20 


1 


1 




19 


_ 


19 


Chatham 








21 


2 




2 


19 


3 


16 


Chelmsford 








174 


10 


8 


2 


164 


5 


159 


Chelsea 








3,101 


366 


1 


365 


2,735 


16 


2,719 


Cheshire 








43 


— 


— 


_ 


43 


1 


42 


Chester 








19 


— 


_ 


_ 


19 


1 


18 


Chesterfield 










_ 


_ 


_ 








Chicopee 








1,862 


124 


73 


51 


1,738 


26 


1,712 


Chilmark 








_ 


— 


_ 










Clarksburg 








46 


1 


_ 


1 


45 


f3 


42 


Clinton 








361 


19 


14 


5 


342 


4 


338 


Cohasset 








84 


12 


7 


5 


72 


• 1 


71 


Colrain 








9 


3 


3 


_ 


6 


r 1 


5 


Concord 








87 


5 


4 


1 


82 


11 


71 


Conway 








15 


1 




1 


14 


4 


10 


Cummington 








2 


2 


_ 


2 








Dalton 








86 


4 


2 


2 


82 


4 


78 


Dana * 








5 


3 


_ 


3 


2 


1 


1 


Danvers 








343 


10 


_ 


10 


333 


18 


315 


Dartmouth 








799 


25 


13 


12 


774 


6 


768 


Dedham 








379 


19 


17 


2 


360 


5 


355 


Deerfield 








29 


- 






29 


8 


21 


Dennis 








44 


3 


_ 


3 


41 


4 


37 


Dighton 








71 


- 


- 




71 


5 


66 



Charlton Home Farm Association. 



136 



Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during 
March 81, 1929 — Continued. 



P.D. 17. 

Year ending 











Aggregate 


In 


[nstitutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND TOWNS 




















In In- 


In Other 




In 


In 






Total 


firmary 


Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


Private 
Families 


Own 
Homes 


Douglas .... 


32 


6 


5 


1 


26 




26 


Dover 




2 


2 


1 


1 


— 


— 


— 


Dracut 




220 


5 


- 


5 


215 


2 


213 


Dudley 




155 


— 


— 


— 


155 


5 


150 


Dunstable 






5 


— 


— 


— 


5 


— 


5 


Duxbury 








67 


8 


8 


- 


59 


4 


55 


East Bridgewater 








72 


8 


8 


— 


64 


1 


63 


East Brookfield i 








20 


1 


— 


1 


19 


3 


16 


East Longmeadow 








52 


1 


- 


1 


51 


1 


50 


Eastham 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Easthampton 








332 


26 


15 


11 


306 


2 


304 


Easton 








125 


9 


6 


3 


116 


2 


114 


Edgartown . 








25 


1 


- 


1 


24 


4 


20 


Egremont 








1 


- 


— 


- 


1 


1 


- 


Enfield 








10 


— 


— 


— 


10 


4 


6 


Erving 








48 


10 


2 


8 


38 


19 


19 


Essex . 








9 


1 


— 


1 


8 


4 


4 


Everett 








1,755 


29 


— 


29 


1,726 


48 


1,678 


Fairhaven . 








561 


9 


8 


1 


552 


1 


551 


Fall River . 








9,403 


602 


422 


180 


8,801 


6 


8,795 


Falmouth 








216 


9 


9 


_ 


207 


2 


205 


Fitchburg 








4,022 


162 


72 


90 


3,860 


15 


3,845 


Florida 








6 


1 


— 


1 


5 


2 


3 


Foxborough 








109 


— 


_ 


— 


109 


1 


108 


Framingham 








628 


23 


2 


21 


605 


2 


603 


Franklin 








49 


10 


10 


— 


39 


— 


39 


Freetown 








15 


3 


— 


3 


12 


3 


9 


Gardner 








571 


42 


32 


10 


529 


7 


522 


Gay Head . 








2 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Georgetown 








39 


5 


4 


1 


34 


4 


30 


Gill . 








6 


— 


— 


— 


6 


3 


3 


Gloucester . 








1,139 


72 


68 


4 


1,067 


2 


1,065 


Goshen 








5 


2 


— 


2 


3 


— 


3 


Gosnold 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Grafton 








147 


7 


5 


2 


140 


1 


139 


Granby 








11 


11 


9 


2 


- 


- 


- 


Granville 








8 


3 


1 


2 


5 


— 


5 


Great Barrington 








98 


3 


— 


3 


95 


25 


70 


Greenfield 








260 


32 


17 


15 


228 


4 


224 


Greenwich . 








1 


1 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


Groton 








51 


5 


5 


— 


46 


— 


46 


Groveland . 








24 


1 


— 


1 


23 


1 


22 


Hadley 








59 


1 


- 


1 


58 


- 


58 


Halifax 








2 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


Hamilton 








39 


1 


_ 


1 


38 


1 


37 


Hampden 








15 


- 


- 


- 


15 


- 


15 


Hancock 








3 


1 


— 


1 


2 


— 


2 


Hanover 








38 


7 


7 


— 


31 


— 


31 


Hanson 








53 


3 


3 


- 


50 


2 


48 


Hardwick x . 








47 


2 


2 


— 


45 


2 


43 


Harvard 








6 


— 


— 


- 


6 


3 


3 


Harwich 








50 


7 


6 


1 


43 


1 


42 


Hatfield 








23 


2 


— 


2 


21 


— 


21 


Haverhill 








4,326 


1,108 


236 


872 


3,218 


- 


3,218 


Hawley 








8 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


8 


Heath 








3 


1 


— 


1 


2 


2 


— 


Hingham 








107 


13 


10 


3 


94 


7 


87 


Hinsdale 








26 


— 


— 


— 


26 


— 


26 


Holbrook 








18 


— 


— 


— 


18 


— 


18 


Holden l 








77 


8 


1 


7 


69 


1 


68 


Holland J 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Holliston 








80 


14 


14 


— 


66 


— 


66 


Holyoke 








3,622 


412 


308 


104 


3,210 


22 


3,188 


Hopedale 








43 


- 


- 


- 


43 


4 


39 


Hopkinton . 








38 


3 


- 


3 


35 


4 


31 


Hubbardston l 








25 


4 


— 


4 


21 


3 


18 


Hudson 








229 


18 


12 


6 


211 


2 


209 


Hull . 








58 


8 


3 


5 


50 


15 


35 


Huntington . 








23 


- 


- 


- 


23 


1 


22 


Ipswich 








308 


11 


9 


2 


297 


7 


290 


Kingston 








118 


4 


— 


4 


114 


17 


97 


Lakeville 








6 


1 


— 


1 


5 


3 


2 


Lancaster 








49 


4 


3 


1 


45 


— 


45 


Lanesborough 








18 


— 


— 


— 


18 


— 


18 


Lawrence 








4,319 


631 


618 


13 


3,688 


36 


3,652 


Lee 








70 


6 


— 


6 


64 


6 


58 


Leicester l 








164 


3 


2 


1 


161 


3 


158 



Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Pt. III. 137 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 31, 1929 — Continued. 



CITIES AND TOWNS 



Aggregate 



In Institutions 



Total 



In In- In Other 
firmary Insti- 
tutions 



Outside 



In In 

Total Private Own 
Families Homes 



Lenox . 








66 








66 


3 


63 


Leominster . 






989 


37 


30 


7 


952 


17 


935 


Leverett 






10 


2 


1 


1 


8 


2 


6 


Lexington . 






117 


17 


7 


10 


100 


2 


98 


Leyden 






1 


— 


— 


_ 


1 


1 


— 


Lincoln 






7 


2 


2 


_ 


5 


_ 


5 


Littleton 






15 






_ 


15 


1 


14 


Longmeadow 






2 


2 


_ 


2 






- 


Lowell 






7,410 


S37 


733 


104 


6,573 


19 


6,554 


Ludlow 






360 


6 


— 


6 


354 


14 


340 


Lunenburg . 






35 


- 


- 




35 


7 


28 


Lynn . 






3,786 


239 


167 


72 


3,547 


63 


3,484 


Lynnfield 






4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


3 


1 


Maiden 






1,033 


141 


97 


44 


892 


14 


878 


Manchester . 






30 


5 


5 




25 




25 


Mansfield 






226 


14 


4 


10 


212 


8 


204 


Marblehead 






220 


21 


21 




199 


5 


194 


Marion 






40 


1 


1 


_ 


39 


1 


38 


Marlborough 






791 


56 


51 


5 


735 


34 


701 


Marshfield . 






48 


9 


9 




39 


1 


38 


Mashpee 






30 


1 




1 


29 


1 


28 


Mattapoisett 






56 


7 


5 


2 


49 


- 


49 


Maynard 






187 


4 


2 


2 


183 


4 


179 


Medfield 






21 


3 


_ 


3 


18 


4 


14 


Medford 






924 


37 


26 


11 


887 


4 


883 


Medway 






72 


— 




_ 


72 


3 


69 


Melrose 






226 


19 


_ 


19 


207 


7 


200 


Mendon 






11 


_ 


_ 




11 


1 


10 


Merrimac 






79 


5 


1 


4 


74 


7 


67 


Methuen 






682 


33 


15 


18 


649 


1 


648 


Middleborough 






441 


39 


30 


9 


402 


12 


390 


Middlefield . 


















_ 


Middleton . 






30 


_ 


_ 


_ 


30 


11 


19 


Milford 






460 


53 


44 


9 


407 


22 


385 


Millbury i . 






310 


13 


2 


11 


297 


15 


282 


Millis . 






3 








3 




3 


Millville 






28 


5 


2 


3 


23 


2 


21 


Milton 






73 


16 


4 


12 


57 


6 


51 


Monroe 




















Monson 






56 


4 


4 


_ 


52 


_ 


52 


Montague . 






145 


20 


11 


9 


125 


7 


118 


Monterey 






1 








1 


1 




Montgomery 






1 


1 


_ 


1 






_ 


Mount Washington 










_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


Nahant 






9 


_ 


_ 


_ 


9 


_ 


9 


Nantucket . 






38 


14 


13 


I 


24 


3 


21 


Natick 






553 


30 


24 


6 


523 


8 


515 


Needham 






131 


1 




1 


130 


20 


110 


New Ashford 






_ 




_ 










New Bedford 






11,117 


546 


425 


121 


10,571 


82 


10,489 


New Braintree * . 






10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


10 


_ 


10 


New Marlborough 






21 


1 


_ 


1 


20 


2 


18 


New Salem . 






6 


_ 


_ 




6 


1 


5 


Newbury 






21 


1 


_ 


1 


20 




20 


Newburyport 






367 


36 


36 




331 


3 


328 


Newton 






712 


23 


19 


4 


689 


2 


687 


Norfolk 






24 


3 




3 


21 




21 


North Adams 






731 


118 


45 


73 


613 


_ 


613 


North Andover 






118 


11 


10 


1 


107 


5 


102 


North Attleborough 






323 


29 


29 




294 


8 


286 


North Brookfield . 






87 


7 


6 


1 


80 


5 


75 


North Reading 






42 


3 




3 


39 


1 


38 


Northampton 






683 


62 


36 


26 


621 


1 


620 


Northborough 






52 


2 


_ 


2 


50 


10 


40 


Northbridge 






432 


23 


11 


12 


409 


1 


408 


Northfield . 






36 


— 


_ 


_ 


36 


10 


26 


Norton 








67 


3 


_ 


3 


64 


7 


57 


Norwell 








20 


6 


4 


2 


14 




14 


Norwood 








257 


2 




2 


255 


22 


233 


Oak Bluffs 








84 


2 


_ 


2 


82 


4 


78 


Oakham 1 








2 


2 


1 


1 








Orange 








98 


2 




2 


96 


9 


87 


Orleans 








16 


_ 


_ 




16 


2 


14 


Otis . 








4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


4 




Oxford 








141 


22 


21 


1 


119 


3 


116 


Palmer 








336 


25 


15 


10 


311 


5 


306 


Paxton 1 






9 


2 




2 


7 


2 


5 



1 Charlton Home Farm Associati 



138 P.D. 17. 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 81, 1929 — Continued. 



CITIES AND TOWNS 



Aggregate 



In Institutions 



In In- In Other 
Total firmary Insti- 
tutions 



Octside 



In In 

Total Private Own 
Families Homes 



Peabody 








5S6 


53 


43 


10 


533 


16 


517 


Pelham 








9 


— 


— 


— 


9 


1 


8 


Pembroke 








12 


4 


2 


2 


8 


- 


8 


Pepperell 








72 


- 


- 


- 


72 


- 


72 


Peru . 








1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Petersham . 








5 


2 


— 


2 


3 


1 


2 


Phillipston . 








26 


2 


- 


2 


24 


2 


22 


Pittsheld 








1,666 


218 


98 


120 


1,468 


15 


1,453 


Plainfield . 








— 


— 


- 


— 


- 


— 


— 


Plainville 








19 


— 


— 


— 


19 


— 


19 


Plymouth 








357 


18 


17 


1 


339 


7 


332 


Plympton 








5 


— 


— 


— 


5 


1 


4 


Prescott 








1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Princeton l . 








1 


1 


_ 


1 


— 


- 


— 


Prqvineetown 








60 


6 


5 


1 


54 


2 


52 


Quincy 








734 


57 


44 


13 


677 


12 


665 


Randolph 








80 


14 


14 


— 


66 


4 


62 


Raynham 








47 


- 


- 


- 


47 


3 


44 


Reading 








175 


2 


— 


2 


173 


14 


159 


Rehoboth 








23 


3 


- 


3 


20 


5 


15 


Revere 








700 


4 


— 


4 


696 


37 


659 


Richmond , 








5 


— 


_ 


- 


5 


— 


5 


Rochester 








26 


— 


_ 


— 


26 


4 


22 


Rockland 








183 


17 


17 


- 


166 


8 


158 


Rockport 








85 


10 


9 


1 


75 


3 


72 


Rowe . 








3 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Rowley 








30 


3 


- 


3 


27 


1 


26 


Royal ~ton 








51 


— 


— 


— 


51 


9 


42 


Russell 








9 


2 


— 


2 


7 


3 


4 


Rutland i . 








38 


2 


1 


1 


36 


— 


36 


Salem . 








3.564 


156 


108 


4< 


3,408 


37 


3,371 


Salisbury 








51 


5 


- 


5 


46 


5 


41 


Sandisfield . 








1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


Sandwich 








62 


— 


— 


— 


62 


2 


60 


Saugus 








329 


10 


5 


5 


319 


15 


304 


Savoy . 








14 


4 


- 


4 


10 


- 


10 


Scituate 








72 


3 


— 


3 


69 


2 


67 


Seekonk 








59 


1 


- 


1 


58 


1 


57 


Sharon 








36 


1 


— 


1 


35 


3 


32 


Sheffield 








17 


1 


- 


1 


16 


8 


8 


Shelburne 








3 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Sherborn 








17 


1 


— 


1 


16 


4 


12 


Shirley 








65 


11 


2 


9 


54 


— 


54 


Shrewsbury 








213 


- 


- 


- 


213 


3 


210 


Shutesbury . 








14 


1 


— 


1 


13 


3 


10 


Somerset 








269 


3 


2 


1 


266 


3 


263 


Somerville . 








1,802 


214 


61 


153 


1,588 


43 


1,545 


South Hadley 








1S7 


12 


7 


5 


175 


1 


174 


Southampton 








11 


1 


- 


1 


10 


- 


10 


Southborough 








15 


— 


— 


— 


15 


— 


15 


Southbridge 








737 


33 


IS 


15 


704 


22 


682 


Southwick . 








3^ 


1 


— 


1 


37 


2 


35 


Snencer 








112 


13 


13 


— 


99 


5 


94 


Soringfield . 








4.061 


718 


626 


92 


3,343 


13 


3.330 


Sterling « 








27 


3 


— 


3 


24 


1 


23 


Stockbridge . 








21 


- 


- 


- 


21 


2 


19 


Stoneham 








148 


21 


19 


2 


127 


14 


113 


Stoughton . 








124 


12 


10 


2 


112 


16 


96 


Stow . 








20 


3 


2 


1 


17 


1 


16 


Sturbridge . 








38 


5 


4 


1 


33 


1 


32 


Sudbury 








32 


e 


- 


6 


26 


1 


25 


Sunderland . 








28 


l 


— 


1 


27 


— 


27 


Sutton 








88 


6 


6 


— 


82 


3 


79 


Swampscott 








128 


5 


2 


3 


123 


4 


119 


Swansea 








22 


— 


— 


— 


22 


1 


21 


Taunton 








1,395 


96 


80 


16 


1,299 


9 


1,290 


Temoleton . 








62 


— 


— 


— 


62 


— 


62 


Tewksbury . 








40 


3 


- 


3 


37 


- 


37 


Tisbury 








6 


— 


— 


- 


6 


— 


6 


Tolland 








- 


— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


Topsfield 








16 


1 


— 


1 


15 


5 


10 


Townsend . 








58 


7 


5 


2 


51 


1 


50 


Truro . 








5 


— 


— 


- 


5 


— 


5 


Tyngsborough 








53 


1 


- 


1 


52 


- 


52 


Tyringham . 








2 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


Upton 






24 


3 


3 


— 


21 


— 


21 


Uxbridge 




95 


19 


19 


" 


76 




76 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Pt. III. 139 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 81, 1929 — Concluded. 













Aggregate 


In Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND TOWNS 




















In In- 


In Other 




In 


In 






Total 


firmary 


Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


Private 
Families 


Own 
Homes 


Wakefield .... 


308 


22 


18 


4 


286 


3 


283 


Wales . 










8 


— 


— 


— 


8 


— 


8 


Walpole 










78 


8 


- 


8 


70 


8 


62 


Waltham 










935 


73 


41 


32 


862 


1 


861 


Ware . 










187 


7 


7 


— 


180 


7 


173 


Wareham 










129 


10 


9 


1 


119 


6 


113 


Warren l 










136 


17 


1 


16 


119 


1 


118 


Warwick 










4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


3 


Washington 










1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


Watertown 










613 


31 


13 


18 


582 


41 


541 


Wayland 










48 


1 


- 


1 


47 


- 


47 


Webster 










583 


33 


24 


9 


550 


2 


548 


Wellesley 










57 


2 


- 


2 


55 


5 


50 


Wellfleet 










12 


— 


— 


— 


12 


8 


4 


Wendell 










16 


- 


- 


- 


16 


- 


16 


Wenham 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


West Boylston l 








37 


2 


- 


2 


35 


- 


35 


West Bridgewater 








59 


— 


— 


— 


59 


— 


59 


West Brookfield 1 








13 


7 


4 


3 


6 


— 


6 


West Newbury 








35 


- 


- 


- 


35 


4 


31 


West Springfield 








613 


3 


- 


3 


610 


19 


591 


West Stockbridge 








23 


— 


— 


— 


23 


2 


21 


West Tisbury 








1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


Westborough 








166 


18 


11 


7 


148 


4 


144 


Westfield 








424 


40 


25 


15 


384 


9 


375 


Westford 








70 


6 


6 


- 


64 


1 


63 


Westhampton 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Westminster i 








70 


17 


3 


14 


53 


— 


53 


Weston 








3 


1 


— 


1 


2 


2 


— 


Westport 










129 


11 


8 


3 


118 


1 


117 


Westwood 










13 


1 


— 


1 


12 


— 


12 


Weymouth 










783 


21 


20 


1 


762 


13 


749 


Whately 










24 


6 


1 


5 


18 


1 


17 


Whitman 










102 


1 


— 


1 


101 


20 


81 


Wilbraham 










135 


- 


- 


- 


135 


5 


130 


Williamsburg 








35 


3 


- 


3 


32 


4 


28 


Williamstown 








61 


1 


— 


1 


60 


3 


57 


Wilmington . 








76 


10 


- 


10 


66 


- 


66 


Winchendon 








395 


43 


21 


22 


352 


10 


342 


Winchester . 








275 


6 


- 


6 


269 


18 


251 


Windsor 








1 


1 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


Winthrop 








117 


9 


8 


1 


108 


11 


97 


Woburn 








679 


40 


39 


1 


639 


1 


638 


Worcester 








7,329 


283 


271 


12 


7,046 


506 


6,540 


Worthington 








5 


4 


- 


4 


1 


- 


1 


Wrentham . 








29 


12 


11 


1 


17 


2 


15 


Yarmouth . 








79 


- 


- 


- 


79 


5 


74 


Grand total . 


149,523 2 


12,358 


8,100 


4,258 


137,165 


3,465 


133,700 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 

2 Added to this number will be 4,685 aided in State institutions shown in Table II. 



140 P.D. 17. 

Table II. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by the State in Insti- 
tutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes, during the Year ending 
March 81, 1929. 

Aggregate _ 34,899 

In institutions: 

Total . 6,200 

State Infirmary ........... 3,559 

Infirmary Ward, State Farm ......... 224 

Massachusetts Hospital School ......... 902 

Town or City Infirmary .......... 461 

Other institutions ........... 1,054 

Outside: 

Total 28,699 

Private families ........... 338 

Own homes 28,361 



Table III. — Movement during the Year ending March 81, 1929, of the Poor 

Supported or Relieved. 



Source of Support or Relief 



Cities 

and 

Towns 

Number supported or relieved April 1, 1928 56,730 16,152 

Number admitted to support or relief during the year . . . 62,579 18,747 

Number who died, were discharged from support, or were transferred to 
other institutions during the year: 

Total 57,750 

Died 2,050 

Discharged 54,370 

Transferred 1,330 

Number remaining April 1, 1929 61,559 



State 



18,878 

591 

16,879 

1,408 

16,021 



Total 

72,882 
81,326 



76,628 
2,641 

71,249 
2,738 

77,580 



Table IV. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year end- 
ing March 31, 1929, classified by Color, Nativity and Sex. 

Cities 
Source of Relief and State Total 

Towns 
Aggregate 
Male 
Female 
White . 
Native: 

Total 

Male 

Female 
Foreign: 

Total 

Male 

Female 
Unknown: 

Total 

Male 

Female 
Colored. 
Native : 

Total 

Male 

Female 
Foreign: 

Total 

Male 

Female 
Unknown: 

Total 

Male 

Female 



119,309 
56,414 
62,895 

116,239 


34,899 
18,186 
16,713 
33,912 


154,208 
74,600 
79,608 

150,151 


91,114 
44,614 
46,500 


23,728 
12,305 
11,423 


114,842 
56,919 
57,923 


24,607 
10,149 
14,458 


9,854 
5,202 
4,652 


34,461 
15,351 
19,110 


518 

242 

276 

3,070 


330 

188 
142 
987 


848 

430 

418 

4,057 


2,626 
1,214 
1,412 


851 

424 
427 


3,477 
1,638 
1,839 


418 
178 
240 


130 
64 
66 


548 
242 
306 


26 
17 
9 


6 
3 
3 


32 
20 
12 



Table V. — Number of Native-born Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during 
the Year ending March 31, 1929, classified by Parent Nativity. 

Cities 

Source of Relief and State Total 

Towns 

Total native born 93,740 24,579 118,319 

Parents: 

Native 33,078 8,176 41,254 

Foreign ' 40,090 10,779 50,869 

Mixed 17,619 4,698 22,317 

Unknown 2,953 926 3,879 



Pt. III. 

Table VI. 



Aggregate 

Under 5 

5 to 9 

10 to 14 

15 to 19 

20 to 24 

25 to 29 

30 to 34 

35 to 39 

40 to 44 

45 to 49 

50 to 54 

55 to 59 

60 to 64 

65 to 69 

70 to 74 

75 to 79 

80 to 84 

85 to 89 

90 to 94 

95 to 99 
100 and over 
Unknown 



141 

Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year end- 
ing March 31, 1929, classified by Present Age. 

Cities 
Sotjece of Relief and State Total 

Towns 



19,309 


34,899 


154,208 


11,732 


3,442 


15,174 


20,651 


6,087 


26,738 


20,670 


5,931 


26,601 


12,926 


3,695 


16,621 


4,860 


1,392 


6,252 


4,421 


1,314 


5,735 


5,592 


1,801 


7,393 


6,968 


2,173 


9,141 


6,367 


2,011 


8,378 


4,666 


1,541 


6,207 


3,268 


1,055 


4,323 


2,959 


939 


3,898 


2,827 


920 


3,747 


3,179 


855 


4,034 


2,945 


645 


3,590 


2,338 


462 


2,800 


1,184 


185 


1,369 


501 


78 


579 


125 


20 


145 


31 


4 


35 


4 


3 


7 


1,095 


346 


1,441 



Table VII. — Number of Mentally Impaired Persons Supported or Relieved as 
Poor Persons during the Year ending March 31, 1929, classified by Mental 
Defect and by Sex. 



Source of Relief 

Aggregate ...... 

Male 

Female ...... 

Insane: 

Total 

Male 

Female ...... 

Idiotic: 

Total 

Male 

Female ...... 

Epileptic: 

Total 

Male 

Female ...... 



Cities 






and 


State 


Total 


Towns 






271 


60 


331 


150 


38 


188 


121 


22 


143 


110 


51 


161 


58 


33 


91 


52 


18 


70 


117 


7 


124 


63 


4 


67 


54 


3 


57 


44 


2 


46 


29 


1 


30 


15 


1 


16 



State 



Total 



Table VIII. — Number of Poor Persons Discharged from Support or Relief during 
the Year ending March 31, 1929, classified by Character of Discharge and Sex. 

Cities 
Source of Relief and 

Towns 

Aggregate ........... 57,750 

Male 28,440 

Female 29,310 

To care of relatives and friends: 

Total 28,342 

Male 14,245 

Female . _ 14,097 

To other institutions: 

Total 1,330 

Male 726 

Female 604 

To care of self: 

Total 26,028 

Male 12,266 

Female 13,762 

Died: 

Total 2,050 

Male 1,203 

Female 847 



18,878 

10,265 

8,613 


76,628 
38,705 
37,923 


8,126 
4,090 
4,036 


36,468 
18,335 
18,133 


1,408 
806 
602 


2,738 
1,532 
1,206 


8,753 
4,965 
3,788 


34,781 
17,231 
17,550 


591 

404 
187 


2,641 
1,607 
1,034 



Cities 






and 


State 


Total 


25,025 


9,984 


35,009 


6,455 


3,270 


9,725 


1,679 


511 


2,190 


245 


79 


324 


4,620 


1,612 


6,232 


3,204 


1,414 


4,618 


2,401 


861 


3,262 


366 


100 


466 


440 


155 


595 


5,615 


1,982 


7,597 



142 P.D. 17. 

Table IX. — Number of Foreign-born Persons who Received Public Relief during 
the Year ending March 31, 1929, classified by Countries of Birth. 

Soubce of Relief 

Total foreign-born , . . . 

Number born in: 

Canada ........... 

England and Wales ......... 

Germany ........... 

Ireland ........... 

Italy 

Russia and Poland ......... 

Scandinavia .......... 

Scotland ........... 

Other countries .......... 

Table X. — Percentage of the Various Classes of Persons Relieved at Public Ex- 
pense during the Year ending March 31, 1929, to the Whole Number so Relieved. 

Source of Relief 
Total number of persons relieved ........... 154,208 

Percentage: 

Local 77.37 

State 22.63 

Place of Relief: 
In institutions: 

Total 11.05 

Infirmaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.25 

Other institutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . 76 

State institutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . 04 

Outside: 

Total 88.95 

Private families . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . 25 

Own homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86.70 

Age: 

20 and under . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56.36 

21 to 59 32.13 

60 and over 10.57 

Unknown ............... .94 

Sex: 

Male 48.38 

Female 51.62 

Color: 

White 97.37 

Colored ._ 2.63 

Mental condition: 

Sane 99.79 

Insane ............... .10 

Idiotic .08 

Epileptic .03 

Table XI. — Numerical Relation to the Whole Population of the Several Classes 
of Persons Relieved at Public Expense during the Year ending March 31, 1929. 

Population, 1925 4,144,205 

Number per 1,000 of population: 

Of all persons relieved . . . . . . . . . . . . 37.21 

Of males 18.00 

Of females 19.21 

Of native born 28.55 

Of foreign born . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . 45 

Of native born of foreign parentage . . . . . . . . . . 12.27 

Of unknown birth ............. .21 

Of vagrants .............. 2.71 



Pt. III. 



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152 P.D. 17. 

Table XIII. — Net Cost to the State of Supporting and Relieving Poor Persons 
in Institutions and in Families. 

Aggregate $2,519,489 59 

Ordinary expenditures 2,473,461 24 

In institutions . . $645,175 18 

State Infirmary $501,556 53 

State Farm 41,221 28 

Massachusetts Hospital School . . . 102,397 37 

Total, outside institutions 1,828,286 06 

Extraordinary expenditures on account of institutions ....... 46,028 35 

Table XIV. — Total Net Cost of Public Poor Relief in Massachusetts during the 

Year ending March 81, 1929. 

summary of relief 

Cities and 

Soubce of Relief Towns State Total 

Aggregate $11,185,887 28 $2,519,489 59 $13,705,376 87 

Ordinary expenditures: 

Total 10,378,310 27 2,473,461 24 12,851,771 51 

In institutions 2,709,350 40 645,175 18 3,354,525 58 

Outside 7,668,959 87 1,828,286 06 9,497,245 93 

Extraordinary expenditures: 

Total 807,577 01 46,028 35 853,605 36 

Account of institutions 807,577 01 46,028 35 853,605 36 

All other 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Adoptions ............... 24 

Adult poor provided for in families, The settled ......... 51 

Advisory Board, Present members of .......... 2 

Aid and Relief, Division of ............ 5 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid ........... 8 

See Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of. 

Subdivision of Settlements . .......... 5 

See Settlements, Subdivision of. 

Subdivision of Social Service ........... 12 

See Social Service, Subdivision of. 

Supervision of wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses ...... 7 

Vocational Education ............ 7 

Boarding homes for aged persons, licensing of ........ . 50 

Boarding homes for infants, licensed ........... 24 

Boys' Parole Branch ............. 30 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 

Burials ................ ^7 

Canton, Massachusetts Hospital School .......... 38 

Capacity of Institutions .............. 43 

Child Guardianship .............. 17 

Adoptions .............. 24 

Applications for discharge ............. 26 

Boarding homes, Summary of infants under two years of age reported .... 28 

Causes for reception of children . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 19 

Children in care and custody of division ......... 17 

Children in custody during year, Summary of all . . . . . . . . 25 

Children over three years of age ........... 22 

Children over three years of age, Summary of ....... . 25 

Children received ............. 17 

Children under three years of age, Summary of . . . . . . . 24 

Collections for support received from cities and towns and directly from parents . . 24 

Disposition by the courts of cases of delinquent and wayward children .... 26 

Disposition by the courts of neglected children ........ 27 

Disposition of children held on temporary mittimi ....... 26 

Feeble-minded Group . . . . . . . . . . . ; 23 

Infants under care ............. 20 

Investigation, Subdivision of ........... 20 

Licensed boarding homes for infants .......... 27 

Licensed lying-in hospitals ............ 28 

Localities from which children were received ........ 27 

Mortality rate in detail ............ 20 

Status of children over three years of age .......... 26 

Tuition of children under the care and control of the Department ..... 29 

Children with settlement provided for in infirmaries, Dependent minor ..... 52 

Children with settlement provided for outside of infirmaries, Dependent minor ... 52 
City and town infirmaries, The ........... 124 

Cities and towns, Penalty incurred for failure to make returns during the month of April, 1929 53 

Cities and towns which have been zoned .......... 35 

City and town poor, The ............. 51 

Commissioner of Public Welfare, Report of ........ . 3 

County Training Schools, The ............ 50 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence ......... 50 

Hampden County Training School, Springfield ........ 50 

Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford ....... 50 

Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School, Walpole 50 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale ........ 50 

Dangerous Diseases ............. 6 

Delinquent and wayward children, Disposition by the courts of cases of ... . 26 

Department of Public Welfare: 

Members of Advisory Board ........... 2 

Principal duties of ............ 4 

Report of Commissioner ............ 3 

Department's finances, The ............ 58 

Dependent minor children: 

With settlement provided for in infirmaries ......... 52 

With settlement provided for outside of infirmaries ....... 52 

Discharge, Applications for ............ 26 

Disposition by the courts of cases of delinquent and wayward children ..... 26 

Disposition by the courts of cases of neglected children ....... 27 

Division of Aid and Relief ............ 5 

See Aid and Relief, Division of. 

Division of Child Guardianship . . . . . . . . . . . 17 

See Child Guardianship, Division of. 

Division of Juvenile Training ............ 30 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 

Divisions of the Department ............ 2 

Duties of the Department ............ 4 

Finances, the Department's 58 

Girl's Parole Branch ............. 31 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 

Hospital School at Canton, Massachusetts .......... 38 

Hospitals, Licensed lying-in ............ 28 



154 



P.D. 17. 



PAGE 

Housing and Town Planning ............ 32 

Amending zoning by-laws ............ 32 

Boards of Appeal ............. 33 

Cities and towns which have been zoned ......... 35 

Effect of main highways on village life ......... 34 

Housing experiment at Lowell ........... 35 

Planning boards ............. 32 

Value of zoning ............. 33 

Zoning administration ............ 33 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley, ........... 41 

Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster .......... 42 

Infant mortality .............. 20 

Infants under care .............. 20 

Infants, Licensed boarding homes for .......... 27 

Infants under two years of age, Summary of Boarding Homes ...... 28 

Infirmary department at State Farm, Bridgewater ........ 37 

Infirmaries, Dependent minor children with settlement provided for in . . . . . 52 

Infirmaries, The city and town . . . . . . . . . . ... 124 

Construction, new and contemplated .......... 125 

Improvements .............. 126 

Infirmaries closed ............. 124 

Inspection of ............. 124 

Laws relating to ............. 124 

Recommendations made ............ 124 

Reports from .............. 127 

Visitors 126 

Institutions, Supervision of ............ 43 

Institutions under supervision of the Department . . . . . . . . 2, 35 

County Training Schools ............ 50 

Supervision of institutions ............ 43 

Capacity, population and inventory ......... 43 

Expenditures ............. 46 

Inventory .............. 43 

Maintenance, net weekly per capita cost ......... 48 

Payroll 49 

Receipts .............. 45 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley .......... 41 

Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster .......... 42 

Infirmary Department of State Farm, Bridgewater ....... 37 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough ......... 40 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton ......... 38 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury ........... 36 

See State Infirmary. 
Investigation, Subdivision of . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 30 

Juvenile Training, Division of ........... . 30 

Boys' Parole Branch ............. 31 

Girls' Parole Branch 31 

Lancaster, State Industrial School for Girls ......... 42 

Laws of 1929 affecting the Department: 

Appropriation for a survey of crippled children ........ 55 

Relative to consent and notice upon petitions for adoption of children .... 55 

Relative to the licensing and supervision of boarding homes for aged persons ... 55 
Relative to investigation of laws affecting dependent, delinquent, neglected and other 

children requiring special care ........... 56 

Licensed boarding homes for infants ........... 27 

Licensing of boarding homes for aged persons ......... 50 

Localities from which new children were received ........ 28 

Lying-in hospitals, Licensed ............ 28 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough .......... 40 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton .......... 38 

Members of Advisory Board ............ 2 

Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of ........... 8 

Distribution .............. 11 

Duration of Mothers' Aid Cases ........... 10 

Factors in Dependency ............ 8 

Number of cases active at end of each year ......... 9 

Reasons for closing Mothers' Aid cases ......... 9 

State appropriations to date ........... 8 

Distribution of Mothers' Aid cases .......... 11 

Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 

Neglected Children, Disposition of, by the court ........ 27 

Occupational Therapy ............. 13 

Past members of State Board of Charity .......... 56 

Poor relief, Penalty for failure to make returns of ....... . 53 

Poor relief, Statistics of 132 

Private charitable corporations ........... 62 

Annual reports of ............ . 63 

Endorsement of ............ . 64 

Inspection of . . . . . . . . . . . 63 

Investigation of charitable organizations seeking incorporation ..... 62 

Number and classification of .......... . 63 

Summary of statistical returns ........... 66 

Recommendations for legislation: 

Repeal of wife-setth ment law ........... 53 

Requirement of annual reports of charitable trusts ....... 53 

Regulation of foreign charitable corporations ........ 54 

Repeal of law relating to transportation of children under care of department . . 54 

Licensing of boarding homes for aged persons ........ 54 

Removals ............... 7 

Report of the Commissioner of Public Welfare ......... 3 



Ft.pl. 155 

PAPE 

Settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towns, Supervision of . . . . . 51 

City and town poor ............. 51 

Dependent minor children with settlement provided for in infirmaries . . . 52 

Dependent minor children with settlement provided for outside of infirmaries ... 52 
Penalty of certain cities and towns for failure to make their returns during the month of 

April, 1929 ... 53 

Settled adult poor provided for in families ......... 51 

Settlements, Subdivision of ........... . 5 

Audit 7 

Burials ............... 7 

Dangerous diseases ............. 6 

Removals .............. 7 

Shipwrecked seamen ............. 6 

Sick State Poor 6 

Temporary Aid ............. 5 

Vocational Education ............ 7 

Wife-settlement ............. 6 

Shirley, Industrial School for Boys ........... 41 

Sick State Poor 6 

Social Service, Subdivision of ........... 12 

Children 14 

General summary ............. 17 

Men 12, 16 

Occupational Therapy ............ 13 

Statistics 15, 16, 17 

Summary of court work ............ 16 

Summary of placement work ........... 16 

Supervision and Placement ........... 14 

Women ............... 13 

Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary during the year .... 15 

Women and children discharged from the State Infirmary during the year ... 15 

State Board of Charity, Past members of ......... 56 

State Farm, Bridgewater, Infirmary department at ....... 37" 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury ............ 36 

Statistics of Poor Relief 132 

Cost 134, 143 

Numbers relieved ............. 132, 135 

Subdivision of Investigation ............ 20 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid ............ 8 

Subdivision of Settlements ............ 5 

Subdivision of Social Service ............ 12 

Supervision of institutions ............ 43 

Supervision of the settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towns .... 51 

Supervision of wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses ....... 7 

Temporary aid .............. 5 

Tewksbury, State Infirmary ............ 36 

Town Planning, Housing and ............ 32 

Training Schools, County ............ 50 

Trustees, Massachusetts Hospital School .......... 38 

Trustees, State Infirmary ..".......... 36 

Trustees, Training Schools ............ 40 

Tuition of children under the care and control of the department ..... 29 

Vocational education ............. 7 

Wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses, Supervision of ...... 7 

Westborough, Lyman School for Boys ........:. 40 

Wife-settlement .............. 6 



Public Document No. 17 



QJlje QjDtnmnnuiealtlj of MussmifrntttB 
ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT 

OF 

Public Welfare 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1930 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2800 6-*31 Order 2709 






€t)e Commtmtoeatti) of ffia$$act>n$ttt$ 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Richard K. Conant, Commissioner, 

To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives: 

The Eleventh Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare covering the 
year from December 1, 1929, to November 30, 1930, is herewith respectfully 
presented. 
Members of the Advisory Board of the Department of Public Welfare. 

Date of 

^PPoiSint 1 Name Residence Expiration 

December 10, 1919 AC. Ratshesky . Boston . 

December 10, 1919 Jeffrey R. Brackett Worcester' 

December 10, 1919 George Crompton SoSnafteS 

December 10, 1919 *GeorgeHMcClean Cambridge 

December 10, 1919 Mrs. Ada Eliot Sheffield .... ^m bridge 

December 10, 1919 Mrs. Mary P. H. Sherburne . . . Brooklme . 

October 9, 1929 John J. O'Connor Holyoke . 



December 10, 1931 
December 10, 1931 
December 1, 1933 
September 19, 1929 
December 10, 1932 
December 10, 1932 
December 1, 1933 



Divisions of the Department of Public Welfare. 

Boston 
Division of Aid and Relief: Room 30, State House 
Frank W. Goodhue, Director 
Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor of Social beryice 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor of Mothers Aid 
Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor of Settlements 

Division of Child Guardianship: Room 43, State House 
Miss Winifred A. Keneran, Director 

Division of Juvenile Training: 41 Mt. Vernon Street 
Charles M. Davenport, Director 

Robert J. Watson, Executive Secretary , , ■ . ^ , 
Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent, Girls' Parole Branch 
John J. Smith, Superintendent, Boys' Parole Branch 

Subdivision of Private Incorporated Charities: Room 37, State House 
Miss Caroline J. Cook, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Miss Florence G. Dickson, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Miss Alice M. Mclntire, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 

Subdivision of Housing and Town Planning: Room 37, State House 
Edward T. Hartman, Visitor to City and Town Planning Boards 

Supervision of Boarding Homes for the Aged and Infirmaries: Room 37, 
State House 
Francis Bardwell, Supervising Inspector of Infirmaries 

Institutions under the Supervision of the Department of Public Welfare. 

State Infirmarv Tewksbury. John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent 
ftaSKiMtal ScLol, Canton. John E Fish M.D M^t 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. Charles A. Keeler bupenntendent 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. George P Campbell, Supenntendent 
Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. Miss Catharine M. Campbell, bupenn- 
tendent 

*Deceased. 



2 P. D. 17 

Part L 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

The solution of the question of old age assistance, which was arrived at this 
year, places Massachusetts in the front rank in care and protection for its aged 
citizens. Unlike the laws of most of the states which had gone into effect pre- 
viously, the Massachusetts law is state-wide and compulsory. It requires local 
boards of public welfare to give adequate assistance to deserving citizens seventy 
years of age or over who are in need. This new law opens the way for a develop- 
ment of social service for aged persons which should become as widespread and as 
generally effective as has been the development of social service for children. It 
is as noteworthy an advance in our relief laws as was the Mothers' Aid Law. The 
administration of this law upon good social service principles, with medical social 
service and careful case work, will be of far greater importance than the admittedly 
great benefit which the money and assistance will provide. We must provide the 
necessary social service for an estimated number of 8,000 persons over seventy 
years of age at an estimated cost of about $2,500,000 a year, in addition to what 
the cities and towns are already spending for the care of aged persons. Unlike 
the laws of some other states, this statute does not fix a maximum of $7.00 a week. 
It has the important advantage of elasticity. We expect that this elasticity, the 
new standards of adequacy, and the good case work which will result for persons 
over seventjr }^ears of age will, in a few years, so affect the method of assisting all 
aged applicants of whatever age that the same principles will be applied to their 
care. The assistance is to be given by city or town boards of public welfare under 
the supervision of the State Department. The State will reimburse one-third of 
the cost in settled cases and the whole cost in unsettled cases. The law goes into 
effect July 1, 1931. The underlying principles of the measure are adequate assist- 
ance at home, individualized treatment of each case, and local administration with 
state supervision. 

On December 1, 1930, the Department presented a preliminary report of its 
survey of crippled children and asked for further time in which to file a complete 
study. This survey is not to be regarded as an attempt to enumerate all children 
with physical defects which ordinarily are classed as crippling; hence the figures 
are not to be compared with such as might be obtained by the routine examination 
of all children and the recording of every physical defect found. Surveys of 
crippled children have generally attempted to list every child with a defect of the 
bones or muscles, regardless of whether this was sufficient to be a real handicap, 
including, for example, children whose only defect was a slight case of rickets or 
the loss of a finger. In this survey, however, it was deemed better to make a more 
intensive study of those children who were so crippled as to interfere seriously with 
their education or work, and to assist as far as possible in providing proper care 
and education for those who were not already receiving it. This ought to give a 
picture of the children in the state who are really crippled. 

In order to have the decision as to whether or not the children should be included 
in the survey made uniformly by one investigator, it was necessary to extend the 
study over a longer period of time than would have been the case if we had been 
willing to reh r upon less careful and uniform standards of decision. Up to Novem- 
ber 1, 1930, it has been possible to cover approximately three-fourths of the children 
reported, and among these children 4,135 were found who were seriously enough 
handicapped to be included in this survey. In regard to these 4,135 children, a 
few of the significant facts were presented in the preliminary report (House Docu- 
ment No. 7). 

During the progress of the survey, the Legislature of 1930 enacted a law which 
will be of much use in perpetuating this work in behalf of crippled children. Chap- 
ter 368 of the Acts of 1930 requires cities and towns to make an annual census of 
crippled children, under the supervision of the Departments of Education and 
Public Welfare. This should in the future prevent crippled children from escaping 
unnoticed when they are in need of treatment or education. Merely to perpetuate 
this survey, as this act has done, is a great forward step. In addition, the law 
provides for home teaching of crippled children in towns where there are five or 



Pt. I. 3 

more so crippled as to make attendance at a public school not feasible and who 
are not otherwise provided for. The organization of these classes and the approval 
of the home instruction in each instance is to be approved by the Departments of 
Education and Public Welfare. This provision will give an opportunity for the 
two departments to develop a system of special education and social service to 
meet the needs of crippled children. For the sake of securing the necessary infor- 
mation to guide the departments in this supervision, the completion of the present 
survey is essential. The individual reports have already proved of the most 
definite value in providing the necessary information about the children who have 
been listed by the towns for home teaching, subject to the approval of the depart- 
ments. If the initial complete state-wide survey can be completed at this time, 
it will make much easier for the cities and towns the work of carrying on the 
required annual surveys. 

The legislation of 1930 seems to us sufficient for the present. In another year, 
if its operation points to necessary changes, they can be recommended by the 
supervising departments. The value of the present survey will lie in the complete 
discovery of the facts about crippled children, and in the establishment of a system 
of case work to provide for all those who need further care and treatment. 

For two years a special commission, upon which this Department was repre- 
sented by its Commissioner, has been studying the laws relative to dependent, 
delinquent and neglected children and children otherwise requiring special care. 
Its report to the Legislature (House Document No. 1200 of 1931) recommends 
many changes in our laws. After a painstaking study of the laws of this and 
other states, we have gone as far as it seemed practicable to go in each field of 
inquiry towards setting up an ideal system of child welfare laws and administration. 
The most important recommendations which affect the work of the Department 
of Public Welfare are as follows : 

Dependent Children. 

1. For the purpose of securing better protection for children between two and 
seven years of age who are placed in foster homes, away from their own families 
or blood relatives, supervision by the Department of Public Welfare should be 
extended to cover children so placed up to the age of seven years. 

2. To secure protection for children brought into Massachusetts from other 
states for placement in foster homes, and to guard against their becoming public 
charges, the Department of Public Welfare should be authorized to regulate such 
importation of children and to require security for their proper care and support. 

Mothers' Aid. 

3. The age limit for mothers' aid should be advanced from fourteen to sixteen 
years in order that children in families receiving this aid may remain in school, 
if they can profit by such further instruction, instead of being compelled to go to 
work when they become fourteen years of age and are eligible for a working cer- 
tificate. 

Neglected Children. 

4. In order to embrace within the legal definition of neglected children those 
whose want of proper care is due to the mental incapacity of their parents, the 
present classification of parental irresponsibility should be broadened so as to 
include mental defect as well as insanity. 

5. In proceedings affecting neglected children, if the court placed such children 
during continuance or pending appeal in the care of the Department of Public 
Welfare, the court's protective purpose should not be allowed to be thwarted by 
the furnishing of surety or bail. 

Delinquent Children. 

7. To conform to the laws and practice in the majority of states, and in accord- 
ance with well-settled opinion here and throughout the country that youthful 
offenders should be treated on a non-criminal basis, it is strongly recommended 
that our juvenile law age should be raised from seventeen to eighteen years. 

10. To assist in determining the wisest treatment of children brought into court, 
and to save them from further delinquency, physical and mental examinations of 
all juvenile offenders should be made before commitment to an institution. 



4 P. D. 17 

11. To avoid the commitment to jail of juvenile delinquents over fourteen years 
of age held in default of bail pending examination, trial or appeal, and for whom 
such restraint is not held to be requisite, especially those whose physical condition 
needs attention, the court should be authorized to place such children in the care 
of the Department of Public Welfare with its consent. 

12. In the specialized treatment of juvenile offenders, the finding of delinquency 
and its treatment should be separated by permitting appeal only as to the fact of 
delinquency. Treatment should be reserved to the Juvenile Court and the juvenile 
sessions of the district courts. 

Adoptions. 

22. Investigation of all petitions for adoption of children under fourteen years 
of age should be required, to enable the court to decide the petition on the basis 
of full knowledge as to its desirability. . 

23. Before the adoption of a child under fourteen years is allowed it should 
be required, subject to waiver by the court for good cause, that the child shall 
have resided with the petitioners for at least six months, so as to prevent hasty 
and ill-advised adoptions. 

Illegitimacy. 

26. In order to protect more fully the rights and safeguard the welfare of illegit- 
imate children and their mothers, notice of such births should be given promptly 
by maternity hospitals to the Department of Public Welfare, whose duty it shall 
be to assure itself that the rights and interests of the child and his mother are safe- 
guarded. 

DUTIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

The State Department of Public Welfare has the following principal duties: 

1. Supervision over the five state institutions of the Department: 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury. 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton. 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. 
State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. 

2. Direction of public relief, both indoor and outdoor, given to unsettled persons 

by cities and towns. 

3 Supervision of mothers' aid rendered by cities and towns. 

4 Care and maintenance of delinquent, neglected and dependent children coming 

into the custody of the Department through court commitment or otherwise. 

5 Institutional custody and treatment of juvenile offenders committed by the 

courts to the three State Training Schools, and the care of these children m 
families when on parole. . 

6. General supervision of the work of the city and town Planning Boards. _ 

7. Visitation and inspection of private incorporated charitable agencies; investiga- 

tion of petitions for the incorporation of private charities; and the require- 
ment and reception of annual returns from domestic and foreign charitable 
trusts and from foreign charitable corporations. 
Among the other supervisory and inspectional duties of the Department may be 
mentioned the following: 

1. Visitation and inspection of city and town infirmaries. 

2. Visitation and inspection of the five county training schools. 

3. Visitation and investigation of care given to all children supported by the 

several cities and towns. . 

4. Visitation and investigation of care given to all adults supported in lammes, 

other than their own, by cities and towns. 

5. Reception and classification of the annual returns of cities and towns relative 

to poor persons supported and relieved and the cost thereof. 

6. Visitation and inspection of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses. 

7. Investigation of legal settlement of persons, possibly State charges, who have 

been supported, relieved, or buried by cities and towns, and of sane inmates 
of State institutions. 



Pt. I. 5 

8. Sending poor persons to the places within and without the Commonwealth 

where they belong. 

9. Execution of the laws concerning infants and the licensing of infant boarding 

houses. 

10. Licensing maternity hospitals. 

11. Licensing boarding homes for the aged. 

RICHARD K. CONANT, 

Commissioner of Public Welfare. 



DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 

Fkank W. Goodhue, Director. 
Subdivision of Settlements. 

Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor. 

The subdivision of settlements investigates the legal settlement of all persons 
officially called to the attention of the division by the boards of public welfare and 
boards of health; investigates the settlement of patients admitted to the State 
Infirmary, State Farm (infirmary department), state sanatoria, and the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital School; and supervises public relief rendered in homes and hos- 
pitals by cities and towns to persons without legal settlement. The subdivision 
also discharges inmates of the State Farm (infirmary department), visits poor per- 
sons supported by cities and towns in families, and investigates, upon request of 
the Division of Vocational Education, the circumstances of persons receiving 
vocational training, who apply for aid during rehabilitation. 

The following table is a summary of the work done during the year in the exam- 
ination and investigation of settlements of inmates of the state institutions: 













Settle- 


No 


Orders 


Total 






Examina- 


Orders 


ments 


Settle- 


With- 


Cases 


Institution 






tions 


Issued 


Found 


ment 


drawn 


Returned 


State Infirmary- 






3,401 


937 


616 


161 


39 


816 


State Farm .... 






43 


31 


24 


5 


2 


31 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 






161 


136 


116 


8 


- 


124 


North Reading State Sanatorium 






282 


230 


212 


7 


— 


219 


Rutland State Sanatorium 






70 


57 


62 


4 


— 


66 


Westfield State Sanatorium 






196 


150 


152 


10 


— 


162 


Massachusetts Hospital School 






64 


64 


58 


5 


41 


63 


Totals .... 


4.217 


1,605 


1,240 


200 


1,481 


Cases pend 


ng 


Nov 


30, 1929 






. 385 






Cases pend 


ng 


Nov 


30, 1930 






. 509 







Temporary Aid (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 18, as amended by ch. 221, Acts of 
1924). — Cities and towns are authorized by statute to furnish adequate assistance 
to poor persons having no lawful settlements, if so ordered by the Department of 
Public Welfare. 

On December 1, 1929, there were 2,512 continued cases including 10,299 persons, 
and during the year 9,133 notices were received from 256 cities and towns con- 
cerning 44,568 persons. 

Causes of Aid. 



1928 1929 1930 





1928 


1929 


1930 


Orphans 


17 


16 


9 


Insanity 


23 


13 


23 


Blindness 


13 


12 


10 


Non-support . 


95 


84 


71 


Miscellaneous . 


7 


4 


23 



Illness . 
Desertion 
Widowhood 
Old Age . 
Unemployment 
Insufficient Income . 
Husband in correctiona 
institution . 



1,082 
300 
237 
105 

2,844 
522 

206 



1,128 
343 
203 
134 

2,327 
487 

200 



1,036 
375 
223 
175 

6,260 
768 

160 



Totals 



5,451 4,951 9.133 



The amounts annually appropriated by the Legislature are necessarily for cur- 
rent and previous years. The following tabulation shows the actual amounts 
reimbursed for aid rendered by cities and towns during the years designated: 



Year 



1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 (January 1 to June 30) 

1927-28 (July 1 to June 30) 

1928-29 (July 1 to June 30) 



Number of 
Cases 
2,847 
3,131 
4,848 
7,305 
5,165 
5,664 
4,358 
3,756 
3,223 
8,093 
6,472 
4,320 
5,765 
6,182 
5,584 
4,118 
6,406 
7,099 



Number of 
Persons in 

Families 

12,339 

13,434 

20,714 

32,056 

21,043 

22,258 

17,701 

15,668 

13,313 

32,372 

29,124 

19,370 

27,279 

28,429 

25,720 

18,611 

30,428 

27,126 



P. D. 17 



Amounts 
Reimbursed 
$48,192 85 

63,203 05 
108,337 29 
178,762 28 
159,205 53 
227,831 59 
261,217 44 
311,148 30 
334,565 05 
635,585 63 
586,296 43 
432,334 70 
642,439 34 
661,219 39 
622,201 80 
398,383 23 
883,565 02 
991,207 47 



Chapter 241 of the Acts of 1926 provides that claims against the Commonwealth shall be rendered to 
the department on or before the first day of October annually, and shall be for the twelve months ending 
on the thirtieth day of June preceding. 

Shipwrecked Seamen (General Laws, ch. 102, sect. 5). — During the year two 
notices were received, one each from Chatham and Truro, which included 3 persons. 

Sick State Poor (General Laws, ch. 122, sect. 17, 18). — The sick law provides 
that no persons shall be sent to the State Infirmary whose health would be endan- 
gered by removal. 

Cities and towns are reimbursed for the support of persons having no legal settle- 
ment who are ill in their homes or in public or privately controlled hospitals, infir- 
maries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb, or blind, provided such persons are not 
in suitable condition for removal to the State Infirmary when applying for assist- 
ance. 

On December 1, 1929, there were 403 continued cases, and during the year notices 
were received from 144 cities and towns concerning 6,354 persons represented as 
too ill to be removed. 

Dangerous Diseases (General Laws, ch. Ill, sect. 116). — The law provides that 
a board of health shall retain charge, to the exclusion of the board of public welfare, 
of any person ill with a disease defined by the Department of Public Health as 
dangerous to the public health. 

If any member of a family is ill with a disease declared dangerous to the public 
health, the aid required by the other members of the family is furnished by the 
board of public welfare, unless the family is quarantined as provided in chapter 111, 
section 95, General Laws, in which event the board of health furnishes all aid 
required. In hospital cases, reimbursement by the Commonwealth is governed by 
the provisions of chapter 122, section 18, General Laws. 

On December 1, 1929, there were 292 continued cases, and during the year notices 
were received from boards of health of 102 cities and towns concerning 1,784 per- 
sons ill with diseases declared dangerous to the public health. 

Wife Settlement (General Laws, ch. 122, sect. 12). — The law provided that "If 
a man who has no legal settlement and is in need of aid has a wife who is receiving 
aid and who has a legal settlement in the Commonwealth, he shall be supported 
by the town where his wife has her settlement." 

On December 1, 1929, there were 96 continued cases, and up to May 27, 1930, 
when the law was repealed, 397 notices were received from 57 cities and towns. 

The wife-settlement law was repealed by Chapter 66 of the Acts of 1930. 

The original wife-settlement law was enacted in 1855 to prevent the separation 
of husband and wife, if the wife had a legal settlement and the husband had no 
settlement, and the place where the wife had a settlement was required to send 
notice to the state. 

Under modern methods of administering relief, where aid is given in the home 
rather than at an institution, the danger of separation has disappeared and the 
need for a wife-settlement law has ceased to exist. 

Since May 27, 1930, relief in such cases has been given under the temporary aid 
law, and boards of public welfare granting the aid have been able to deal directly 
with the state regarding notice and reimbursement for the husband's share of the aid. 



Pt. I. 7 

Burials (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 17, as amended by chapter 298, Acts of 
1923). — The law provides that if the expense of burial is not paid by kindred, 
"An amount not exceeding $40 for the funeral expenses of each person over 12 
years of age, and not exceeding $20 for the funeral expenses of each person under 
that age, shall be paid by the Commonwealth; provided that the board of public 
welfare shall file with each claim an affidavit of the undertaker stating the total 
amount of his bill, the amount received from the town, and the amount received 
from all other sources, and provided, further, that if the total expense of the burial, 
by whomsoever incurred, shall exceed the sum of $100 no payment therefor shall 
be made by the Commonwealth." 

The number of burial claims received during the year was 324 from 62 cities 
and towns. 

Vocational Education (General Laws, ch. 74, sect. 22B). — The law provides 
that the Department of Public Welfare shall, upon request of the State Board of 
Vocational Education, make an investigation of the circumstances of persons 
actually in training afforded by said board, who apply for aid during rehabilitation, 
and shall make a report of its finding to said board. 

During the year 11 applications were received and investigated, 10 of which were 
approved. 

Audit. — The number, amount, and allowance of the bills examined on account 
of cases of temporary aid, sick state poor, dangerous diseases, wife-settlement, 
burial, and mothers with dependent children are shown in the following tabulation. 
It is to be noted that the total shown in this table may vary somewhat from the 
total paid out of the treasury during the fiscal year from the appropriation in ques- 
tion. This possible variance arises from the fact that bills audited by this depart- 
ment are in some cases not actually paid during the year for which the audit is 
shown. For actual expenditures from these respective appropriations see page 60. 

Classes of Cases 
Temporary Aid 
Sick State Poor 
Dangerous Diseases 
Wife- Settlement 
Burial . 
Mothers with Dependent Children 



Removals. — The department is charged with the duty of removing sane poor 
persons to cities and towns within the Commonwealth, or, when not belonging in 
Massachusetts, to the state or place where they belong. The following table 
shows the removals made during the year: 

1928 1929 1930 

To other countries .......... 57 45 92 

To other states .......... 212 203 240 

To towns of residence 1,343 1,153 1,351 



Bills 


Claims 


Allowances 


Deductions 


5,874 


$1,130,785 67 


$1,000,748 83 


$130,036 84 


3,251 


87,270 


66 


72,475 47 


14,795 


19 


1,046 


85,740 


54 


77,998 86 


7,741 


68 


377 


12,874 


47 


12,038 73 


835 74 


264 


7,129 


12 


6,085 62 


1,043 


7,0 


3,174 


889,057 


85 


851,963 61 


37,094 


24 


3,986 


$2,212,858 31 


$2,021,311 12 


$191,547 


19 



1,612 1,401 1,683 

Supervision of Wayfarers' Lodges and Cheap Lodging Houses. 

Boston and Springfield are the only two cities which maintain municipal lodging 
houses. Each has in connection a municipal wood yard where work is required 
for food and lodging and where a work test is in operation for those men with 
families who are receiving relief from the municipal welfare department. Because 
of the unemployment situation this year, the population of these municipal lodging 
houses has increased considerably. 

In the class of lodging houses maintained by charitable corporations there have 
been increases in numbers during the year, particularly with the coming of winter. 
The largest one of this class located in Boston shows a material increase due to the 
reduction in price charged, the fee having been reduced from twenty-five cents to 
ten cents. 

Of the commercial type the reverse must be noted. One large Boston house has 
been closed, while another shows fewer occupied beds during the winter than in 
the summer months. A third shows less numbers housed in November, 1930, than 
during the corresponding month in 1929. 



8 P. D. 17 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid. 

(General Laws, Chapter 118) 

Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor. 

Statistics. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year, on December 1, 1929, there were 2,603 mothers 

with 7,304 dependent children under fourteen years of age receiving Mothers' Aid. 

They were classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 392 mothers with 992 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 2,211 mothers with 6,312 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 2,085 mothers with 5.74S dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 518 mothers with 1,556 dependent children. 

Note. — The 518 living husbands classified as follows: 
241 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
79 were insane, and 
162 had chronic illness. Of these 
68 had tuberculosis and 
94 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
198 were deserting husbands. 
37 were divorced or legally separated. 
42 were in jail. 

During the year 649 new cases were aided and 457 cases w T ere closed, so that 
there were 2,795 mothers in receipt of Mothers' Aid at the close of the fiscal year 
(November 30, 1930). 

The new cases that were received during the fiscal year included 649 mothers 
with 2,189 dependent children, and were classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlements: 

1. Without legal settlement: 71 mothers with 229 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 578 mothers with 1,960 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 418 mothers with 1,436 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 231 mothers with 753 dependent children. 

Note. — The 231 living husbands classified as follows: 
104 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
17 were insane, and 
87 had chronic illness. Of these 
34 had tuberculosis and 
53 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
78 were deserting husbands. 
28 were divorced or legally separated. 
21 were in jail. 



State Appropriations and Reimbursements for Mothers' Aid. 



Sept. 1, 1913, to Nov. 30, 1914 
Dec. 1, 1914, to Nov. 30, 1915 
1,1915, to Nov. 30, 1916 
1, 1916, to Nov. 30, 1917 
1, 1917, to Nov. 30, 1918 
1, 1918, to Nov. 30, 1919 
1, 1919, to Nov. 30, 1920 
1, 1920, to Nov. 30, 1921 
1, 1921, to Nov. 30, 1922 
1, 1922, to Nov. 30, 1923 
1, 1923, to Nov. 30, 1924 
1, 1924, to Nov. 30, 1925 
1, 1925, to Nov. 30, 1926 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



Dec. 1, 1926, to Nov. 30, 1927 



appropriations 
8175,000 00 
250,000 00 
300,000 00 
400,000 00 
475,000 00 
550,000 00 
775,000 00 
900,000 00 
S50.000 00 
900,000 00 
950,000 00 
1,080,000 00 
900,000 00 
1 850,000 00 

1 1,050,032 66 
861,857 49 
871,134 25 



Reimbursements 

S174.999 36 

249,999 62 

299.998 78 

399.999 79 
474,999 63 
549,999 56 
775,028 78 

899.998 94 

849.999 48 
899,999 43 
949,999 97 

1,079,997 87 
900,000 00 

2 359,967 34 
661,175 17 
830,723 24 
851,963 61 



Dec. 1, 1927, to Nov. 30, 1928 
Dec. 1, 1928, to Nov. 30, 1929 
Dec. 1, 1929, to Nov. 30, 1930 

1 Unexpended balance used for ensuing year. 

2 Affected by Chapter 241, Acts of 1926, which changed the period rendering claims against the Com- 
monwealth. 

Number of Mothers' Aid Cases Active at End of Each Fiscal Year since the Enact- 
ment of the Law in 1918. 

3,092 
2,900 
2,870 
2,633 
2,592 
2,602 
2,603 
2,795 



1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 



2,334 


1923 


2,798 


1924 


3,035 


1925 


3,242 


1926 


3,366 


1927 


3,743 


1928 


3,330 


1929 


3,407 


1930 


3,371 





Pt. I 9 

Of the 649 new Mothers 1 Aid cases 91 were reopened cases as follows : 
Families removed from one town to another, 20. Insufficient income, 49. 
Woman home from hospital, 3. Conformity with policies, 7. Husband returned 
to sanitarium, 1. Husband returned to jail, 1. Husband deserted, 1. Second 
husband divorced, 1. Second husband died, 5. Second husband unable to work, 
2. Separated husband not supporting family, 1. Total, 91. 

Reasons for closing Mothers 1 Aid cases: 

Sufficient income, 195. Applicant remarried, 44. Family moved, 39. Husband 
resumed support of family, 26. Non-conformity with policies, 36. Youngest 
child fourteen years of age, 10. Youngest child sixteen years of age, 12. Unfitness 
of mother, 36. Transferred to other sources of relief, 23. Applicant died, 11. 
One dependent child, 5. Male lodger, 3. Disbandment of home, 5. All children 
under fourteen in hospital, 3. Applicant in hospital, 7. Unsuitable housing, 2. 
Total, 457. 

Duration of Mothers 1 Aid cases closed between December 1, 1929, and November 30, 
1930: 

Less than 1 year, 116. Less than 2 years, 55. Less than 3 years, 45. Less 
then 4 years, 38. Less than 5 years, 29. Less than 6 years, 26. Less than 7 years, 
32. Less than 8 years, 19. Less than 9 years, 11. Less than 10 years, 16. Less 
than 11 years, 25. Less than 12 years. 26. Less than 13 years, 6. Less than 14 
years, 8. Less than 15 years, 5. Total, 457. 

There are 39 cities and 316 towns in Massachusetts. At the end of the fiscal 
year all of the 39 cities and 156 of the 316 towns had active Mothers' Aid cases. 
2,190 cases were located in the cities 
605 cases were located in the towns. 



total 2,795. 

The following tables give the population according to the United States Census 
of 1930 and the number of Mothers' Aid cases in each cityjand town. 



List of Cities — arranged according to population — U. S. Census of 1930 with number 


of Mothers 1 Aid Cases active on November 30, 1930. 




Popu- M. A. Popu- M. A> 


City 


lation Cases City lation Cases 


Boston 


781,188 886 Salem .... 43.353 40 


Worcester . 


195,311 100 *Fitchburg . 






40,692 40 


Springfield 


149,900 41 Waltham . 






39,247 46 


*Fall River . . . 


115,374 53 Taunton . 






37,355 14 


Cambridge 


113,643 114 Revere 






35,680 18 


*New Bedford 


112,597 67 Beverly 






25,086 19 


Somerville . 


103,908 53 Northampton 






24,381 8 


Lynn 


102,320 66 Gloucester . 






24,204 8 


*Lowell 


100,234 134 Melrose 






23,170 3 


^Lawrence . 


85,068 50 Leominster 






21,819 14 


Quincy 


71,983 25 Attleboro . 






21,769 11 


Newton 


65,276 31 North Adams 






21,621 5 


*Brockton . 


63,797 28 Peabody . 






21,345 10 


Medford 


59,714 25 Westfield . 






19,775 6 


Maiden 


58,036 12 Woburn . 






19,434 16 


*Holyoke 


56,537 36 Gardner . 






19,399 7 


Pittsfield . 


49,677 8 Marlborough 






15,587 9 


*Haverhill . 


48,710 52 *Newburyport 






15.084 9 


Everett 


48,424 26 


, 


Chelsea .... 


45,816 61 Total 


2.190 


Chicopee .... 


43,930 39 









■Cities which have decreased in population since the U. S. Census of 1920. 



10 



P. D. 17 



List of 156 Towns — arranged alphabetically with population according to the U. 
Census of 1930 and number of Mothers 1 Aid Cases active Nov. 30, 1930. 



S. 



Towns 
Abington 
Acton . 
Adams 
Amesbury 
Andover 
Arlington 
Ashburnham 
Ashland 
Athol 
Auburn 
Barnstable 
Bedford 
Bellingham 
Belmont 
Billerica 
Blackstone 
Bolton 
Bourne 
Brain tree 
Bridge-water 
Brookline 
Burlington 
Canton 
Chatham 
Chelmsford 
Chester 
Clarksburg 
Clinton 
Concord 
Conway 
Dalton 
Danvers 
Dartmouth 
Dedham 
Douglas 
Dracut 
Dudley 
Duxbury 
East Bridgewater 
Easthampton 
Easton 
Essex . 
Fairhaven . 
Falmouth 
Foxborough 
Framingham 
Franklin 
Georgetown 
Grafton 
Greenfield 
Groton 
Groveland 
Hadley 
Hamilton 
Hanover 
Hanson 
Hatfield 
Hawley 
Hingham 
Hinsdale 
Holbrook 
Holliston 
Hopedale 
Hopkinton 
Hubbardston 
Hudson 
Huntington 
Ipswich 
Kingston 
Lancaster 
Lanesborough 
Lee 

Leicester 
Lexington 
Mansfield 
Marblehead 
Marshfield 
Mashpee 
Maynard 
Medway 



Popu- M 


.A. 


lation Cases 


5,872 


5 


2,482 


1 


12,697 


21 


11,899 


6 


9,969 


4 


36,094 


8 


2,079 


1 


2,397 


3 


10,677 


2 


6,147 


5 


7.271 


2 


2,603 


3 


3,189 


1 


21,748 


5 


5,880 


2 


4,674 


2 


764 


1 


2,895 


1 


15,712 


7 


9.055 


1 


47,490 


22 


1,722 


1 


5,816 


2 


1,931 


1 


7,022 


5 


1,464 


1 


1,296 


2 


12,817 


9 


7,477 


5 


900 


1 


4,220 


6 


12,957 


8 


8,778 


1 


15,136 


11 


2,195 


2 


6,912 


6 


4,265 


1 


1,696 


1 


3,591 


3 


11,323 


3 


5,298 


2 


1,465 


1 


10,951 


2 


4,821 


1 


5,347 


1 


22,210 


lit 


7,028 


2 


1,853 


1 


7,030 


9 


15,500 


2 


2,434 


2 


2,336 


1 


2,682 


3 


2,044 


3 


2,808 


1 


2,184 


1 


2,476 


1 


313 


2 


6,657 


1 


1,144 


. 1 


3,353 


1 


2,864 


3 


2,973 


2 


2,563 


1 


1,010 


1 


8,469 


5 


1,242 


1 


5,599 


3 


2,672 


2 


2,897 


3 


1,170 


1 


4,061 


3 


4,445 


2 


9,467 


5 


6,364 


5 


8,668 


6 


1,625 


2 


361 


1 


7,156 


8 


3,153 


4 



Towns 

Methuen 

Middleborough 

Middleton 

Milford 

Millbury 

Millville 

Milton 

Monson 

Montague 

Nahant 

Nantucket 

Natick 

Needham 

Newbury 

Norfolk 

No. Andover 

No. Attleborough 

No. Brookfield 

Northbridge 

Northfield 

N orwood 

Oak Bluffs 

Oxford 

Palmer 

Paxton 

Pembroke 

Pepperell 

Plymouth 

Provincetown 

Randolph 

Reading 

Rockland 

Rowley 

Rutland 

Sandwich 

Saugus 

Scituate 

Sharon 

So. Hadley 

Southbridge 

Spencer 

Sterling 

Stockbridge 

Stoneham 

Sunderland 

Sutton 

Swampscott 

Templeton 

Tewksbury 

Tisbury 

Tyngsborough 

Upton 

Uxbridge 

Wakefield 

Walpole 

Ware . 

Watertown 

Webster 

Welleslev 

Wellfleet 

West Newbury 

West Springfield 

Westborough 

Westford 

Westminster 

Weymouth . 

Whately 

Whitman 

Wilbraham . 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Wilmington 

Winchendon 

Winchester . 

Winthrop 

Yarmouth . 

Total 



Popu- 


M. A. 


lation 


Cases 


21,069 


15 


8,608 


9 


1,712 


1 


14,741 


25 


6,957 


5 


2,111 


5 


16,434 


1 


4,918 


1 


8,081 


2 


1,654 


1 


3,678 


2 


13,589 


15 


10,845 


6 


1,530 


1 


1,429 


2 


6,961 


7 


10,197 


5 


3,013 


4 


9,713 


3 


1,888 


1 


15,049 


13 


1,333 


2 


3,943 


2 


9,577 


10 


672 


1 


1,492 


1 


2,922 


6 


13,042 


3 


3,808 


1 


6,553 


1 


9,767 


6 


7,524 


4 


1,356 


2 


2,442 


3 


1,436 


1 


14.700 


7 


3,118 


2 


3,351 


2 


6,773 


3 


14,264 


11 


6,272 


2 


1,502 


1 


1,762 


1 


10,060 


3 


1,159 


3 


2,147 


1 


10,346 


2 


4,159 


1 


5,585 


3 


1,541 


1 


1,358 


1 


2,026 


2 


6,285 


10 


16,318 


2 


7,273 


1 


7,385 


2 


34,913 


27 


12,992 


9 


11,439 


2 


823 


1 


1,549 


1 


16,684 


3 


6,409 


4 


3,600 


2 


1,925 


1 


20,882 


18 


1,136 


1 


7,638 


2 


2,719 


1 


1,891 


2 


3,900 


2 


4,013 


2 


6,202 


2 


12,719 


7 


16,852 


2 


1,794 


1 



605 



Pt. I. 11 

Unemployment. 

During the past year lack of steady work has lowered the earning power of 
children of working age in Mothers' Aid families so that they have contributed 
much less to the support of their families. In some cities and towns factories 
have been closed down altogether for months at a time. In other places they have 
operated on half-time. 

It has been practically impossible to find work for the sixteen-year old boy or 
girl who is ordinarily expected to leave school and find regular employment, and 
the boards of public welfare have permitted many of these children to continue 
at high school rather than have them remain at home idle. To make up for the 
deficit caused by the reduced earnings in Mothers' Aid families, boards of public 
welfare have been obliged to continue to aid many families that would be self- 
supporting under normal business conditions. 

Central Index. 

The Social Service Exchange is the general clearing house. The Boston Social 
Service Exchange, now known as the Central Index, is the only state-wide exchange. 
There are smaller local exchanges in Fall River, New Bedford, Lowell, Lawrence, 
and Lynn, all of which register with the Central Index. Last year 70,000 inquiries 
were received by the Central Index, nearly one-third of which were from state, 
city, or town tax-supported agencies. 

The Index furnishes to an inquiring welfare agency a list of the other agencies 
which have had contact with a given case (or which have inquired about it) with 
the dates of contacts or inquiries. It does not give information about a case, but 
it indicates the sources of information. A letter, a telephone call, or a visit to the 
office of a listed agency (to read the case record there on file or to consult the visitor 
who has known the case) secures the desired information. If several agencies are 
actively interested in the case a conference may be arranged. 

Recently in the Town of S. such a conference was held in the Town Hall. It 
was attended by the Chairman of the Board of Public Welfare, the Secretary of 
the local Welfare League, the District Agent for the Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children, the Mothers' Aid Visitor, and the Mothers' Aid Supervisor. 

Instead of merely increasing the amount of Mothers' Aid in the case, as was at 
first proposed, a much more comprehensive plan was adopted. The mother of the 
family was sent to the Massachusetts Memorial Hospital for a surgical operation, 
and arrangements were made through the Department of Mental Diseases for a 
mental examination for her. She was found to be unable to care for her seven 
children and, through the co-operation of the Division of Child Guardianship, they 
were placed in foster homes. The mother was boarded in a private home, her 
family paying for her board. The maternal relatives also agreed to be responsible 
for part of the expense of the children's board, and the Board of Public Welfare 
agreed to furnish the remainder. Several years ago her relatives had bought a 
house for the use of the family and this was recently sold to make use of the pro- 
ceeds for the board of the mother and children. Mothers' Aid was continued 
until the details of the plan were worked out. The fact that the mother was 
known to the Welfare League, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, 
and the State Department of Mental Diseases was shown by the Central Index 
report. Every Mothers' Aid case is recorded with the Central Index as a matter of 
office routine. 

Subdivision of Social Service. 

Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor. 

The State Infirmary is a good indicator of the sore spots in outside social condi- 
tions, the end results of which are concentrated in the overcrowded wards. 

This past year the State Infirmary has been filled to capacity — a daily average 
of 2,826, or 259 more than in 1929. The largest daily census was 3,058 on February 
21st, and the lowest census 2,633 on June 17th, contrasted with 2,375 the lowest 
in 1929. Why this continued and constant increase? There are two reasons. 
The first cause is undoubtedly unemployment. The majority of our patients are 
unskilled laborers with irregular work for small wages, always the first to be laid 
off and the last to be re-employed. The greatest number of admissions were men 



12 P. D. 17 

between 40 and 60 years, not aged, but not wanted in the working world. This 
group increased noticeably from 671 in 1929 to 1,003 in 1930. Not only does 
unemployment hit our people directly, but it reaches the relatives and friends 
whose homes in normal times offered shelter and assistance to those temporarily 
out of work. Many have come for the first time to the Infirmary rather than be a 
burden to a struggling household. 

The second cause for increase is the large number of chronic sick persons seeking 
hospital care. Tenement houses and apartments are not adapted for the care of 
the sick. Chronic illness is very expensive, years of savings are depleted in the 
long search for health. The patient often has many years to live after his resources 
are gone and free care becomes essential. Massachusetts has very few free beds 
for the chronic sick, outside of the three Boston hospitals for Boston residents and 
the Holy Ghost Hospital, Cambridge, which accommodates a limited number. 
For this reason there is a great demand to admit such patients to the State Infir- 
mary. As they come only after all other resources are exhausted, they remain 
with us for many years. The number will be reduced only as the cities and towns 
in combinations provide their own chronic hospitals or nursing homes. On Decem- 
ber 1st 272 cases with legal settlements -were in the State Infirmary wards. In 
the last two years, several cities have taken a forward step in opening wards in their 
local infirmaries, well equipped with nursing and medical service. Patients from 
other communities and those able to pay are accepted. Those patients who have 
friends and relatives able to bring cheer and encouragement are better cared for in 
a good local infirmary near their homes than at the State Infirmary. The local 
care of the chronic sick will greatly increase the usefulness of the infirmaries and 
fulfill a community need. 

Men. 

With the increase in the number of patients entirely on the men's side of the 
hospital, the work of the two social workers for men has been greatly increased. 
In ordinary times every man is interviewed by the social worker within the first 
week after admission to determine the social service needed before he is discharged. 
For the last three months, however, because of the pressure of work, the men who 
are able-bodied have been sent directly to the Lodge and have not been seen until 
they come for discharge. 

Young men, of whom 139 were between 20 and 30 years and 147 between 30 and 
40 years, receive the first consideration. Another group of special interest is the 
1,169 admitted for the first time. 

Even in this unusual year every patient was interviewed by a social worker 
before he was discharged from the institution. Five hundred sixty-three (563) 
were made social service cases, which means social investigation and social planning 
for the man after discharge. The innumerable bedside services and friendly visits 
mean much to those handicapped by illness and adversity. To give quality service 
in mass quantity is the challenge in public social work and the test of the social 
worker. 

An example of the work which our visitors do at the time of discharge is the 
service which was rendered in the case of a Dutchman who had been in this country 
twenty years and was seventy-eight years old. He was well educated and had 
traveled widely as a salesman, but he had no family here and his nieces and nephew 
in Holland who had some property did not want him. The Dutch Consul was 
asked by the visitor to investigate, and after four months it turned out that our 
patient had a right to a small amount of property in Holland and a home. A check 
was obtained from his relatives in Holland to pay for his transportation. 

Women. 
The census of the women's wards remains about the same as last year, 690 admis- 
sions and 680 discharged. Several patients have come supposedly penniless, only 
to find on investigation that relatives had secured their savings just previous to 
admission. It is very hard to adjust such difficulties because no legal records or 
receipts are available. Usually the relatives, if there are any, are kind and inter- 
ested, but are unable to help financially. The patients seldom have life insurance, 
as it has been cashed in before they reach the infirmary. 



Pt. I. 13 

The Fiske Ward for the tuberculous women was so crowded during the winter 
months that for the first time patients were refused. The fact that tuberculosis 
is taking a heavy toll among young women, nineteen to thirty-nine years of age, 
is evident at Fiske. Many remain for months and need more occupational therapy 
and simple diversions. 

The younger women and girls are socially as difficult within the hospital as with- 
out. The number of patients treated for venereal disease was 215, and many were 
obliged to stay for six or eight months, or even a year, for treatment. They nat- 
urally become restless and impatient and some run away. It would seem that 
some scheme of occupation and training should be worked put for these months 
which would be an asset to the girls when they return to the" community. A year 
in the institution might not only improve the health but would develop the indus- 
triousness and the usefulness of the individual. Such a plan should fit into the 
necessary work of the hospital and help the discipline. 

Routine mental tests for all the younger women would be helpful in social 
treatment. Now the visitor requests a mental examination if the social history 
indicates it. Oftentimes supervision proves the need of such an examination, 
but it is difficult to get a girl to go to the Psychopathic Hospital, whereas she would 
think little of such an inquiry at the infirmary. Even for the normal or super- 
normal girl, treatment would be more intelligent and understandable if based on 
her intelligence and vocational aptitudes. 

One hundred nine (109) women were admitted because of illegitimate pregnancy 
and convalescence. Of the 59 first offenders, 40 came for confinement, and 19 
with their babies came for convalescence; of the 47 women having a second illegit- 
imate child, 26 came for confinement and 21 with their babies for convalescence, 
and 3 women came for a third illegitimate confinement. Seventeen (17) women 
were married and illegitimately pregnant, and 11 married women were admitted 
for legitimate confinement. Thirty-one (31) of the girls admitted from the State 
Industrial School and 23 of the women admitted from the Reformatory for Women 
came for confinement. 

Childeen. 

On December 1, 1929, there were at the State Infirmary 225 children, of which 
70 were between the ages of 15 and 21 years and 155 were under 15 years of age. 
The older group may be classified as follows: 17 pregnant or convalescent from 
confinement, 20 with venereal diseases, 13 with tuberculosis, 3 feeble-minded, 1 
with chronic heart disease, 3 with congenital syphilis, 1 with encephalitis, 1 with 
infantile paralysis, 1 with diabetes, 2 with nervous disorders, and 8 well who were 
awaiting discharge. 

The younger group may be classified as follows : 52 feeble-minded, 7 with gonor- 
rheal infection, 2 with diabetes, 1 with muscular distrophy, 1 with tracheotomy, 
10 with miscellaneous ailments, and 82 infants with their mothers, 60 of whom 
were ready for discharge but whose mothers were under treatment or were awaiting 
social disposition. 

Of the whole number, 55 children were wards of the Division of Child Guardian- 
ship and 24 (21 girls and 3 boys) were wards of the Division of Juvenile Training. 

The ward for tuberculous children has been closed as the State Department of 
Public Health has opened nurseries at its institutions at North Reading and West- 
field. 

Supervision and Placement. 

In checking up the faults and failures of the Division, it is the unanimous com- 
ment that there is too little time for follow-up work and supervision of the girls, 
especially of those who are doing well. The difficult girls are seen often because 
they are always in trouble, out of work, and demanding shelter, but the girl who is 
struggling on quietly gets too little encouragement when she deserves all we can 
give her. Then again, failures in supervision and treatment are often traced back 
to poor investigations and wrong diagnoses which were made hurriedly under the 
pressure of work. 

To really understand a person, first hand information as to her social background 
is essential, and that knowledge should be obtained by the visitor who is to be the 
responsible friend and advisor in the community. The continuous contact of the 



14 P. D. 17 

visitor with the girl and with all her associations becomes invaluable to the girl 
and to her development. 

An example is given of the work of the visitors to girls. N. came to the State 
Infirmary with a second illegitimate child. She had lived with her widowed 
mother and an older sister and brother in a miserable tenement on a shabby street 
in a large city. Since the father's death the family had received public assistance. 
The older sister had also had an illegitimate child who was being boarded by a 
private agency. N.'s first child, three years old, was likewise boarded by a private 
agency. N. had fainting seizures which seemed hysterical and made it impossible 
for her to work. After four months at the Infirmary, her health improved and the 
seizures almost ceased. A good home was found for her where she could do general 
work and the baby was boarded in a foster home. The mother was antagonistic, 
consistently upsetting plans and wanting her to return home to the old environment 
where everyone knew her. On her visits she tried to persuade N. that her work 
was too hard and that she was not being fairly treated. Fortunately N. recognized 
her opportunity to live decently and she has now been in one wage home for two 
years, has had no more hysterical seizures, and visits her children and her mother 
regularly. If this girl had received the benefit of social service when her first 
child came, it is possible that she might have been spared the second misfortune. 

Applications at Office. 

The Social Service Division handles many emergency cases. Many men looking 
for work in Boston, because no work was available in New York, Philadelphia, 
Cleveland, and other cities, have been stranded here without funds. Temporary 
lodgings were provided until telegrams could be sent and received to verify resi- 
dence and then transportation was provided. The Travelers Aid Society, the 
Jewish Welfare Centers, and other agencies sometimes have stranded persons for 
whom they make the investigations and then request the transportation of us. 
Most of these applications mean investigation by letters, visits, telegrams, and 
temporary shelter until satisfactory acknowledgements are received. Two hun- 
dred thirty-eight (238) such applicants for transportation came to the office and 
were assisted, 57 of whom went to other countries. 

One hundred fifty (150) men, some of whom may have been at the State Infir- 
mary at one time, came to ask for work which could not be provided, but often a 
meal or reference to employment agencies or to cheap lodging houses was given. 

Old ladies and middle-aged women, who had walked the city looking for work 
without success, applied at this office and were referred to the Bureau of the Aged, 
the Board of Public Welfare, the Chardon Street Home, or the Rutland Corner 
House. Some few were given work. 

Social agencies, maternity homes and hospitals have referred to us unmarried 
mothers for convalescence and social treatment. This immediate contact often 
prevented an admission to the Infirmary. Thirty-three (33) cases were received. 

Mary Jones was referred to us by the maternity ward of the City Hospital on 
the day when she was ready to leave. She had consistently given a false story 
to the hospital worker and to a social worker from a private agency. Her story 
could not be verified in any respect. We suggested that she be sent with her baby 
to a convalescent home where our visitor would call on her. In a friendly manner 
the visitor explained why she had come, and Mary after a while admitted that she 
had come from the Provinces where her mother was living in a comfortable home. 
She had come to Boston to look for work and lived in a nearby city with a cousin. 
The father of her baby was a man somewhat older than she, who had wanted to 
marry her but she had refused. Because of her love for the baby she felt that she 
might change her mind about marriage. The visitor saw the father, the cousin, 
and the mother, and arranged for the marriage. Our visitor had acquired from a 
wide experience with this kind of social problem a certain skill in the method of 
approach which won co-operation from an unwilling client. 

Note should be made of the 12 girls over twenty-one years of age, formerly wards 
of the Division of Child Guardianship or the Division of Juvenile Training, who 
have been received for placement and supervision. Several have been received 
in the past, but never as many as were received this year. Because a girl becomes 
twenty-one, she is not necessarily able to meet society without aid and advice 



Pt. I. 



15 



from an older person. Many of our wards are extremely lonely, without family 
relationships, and there should be continued assistance offered to those who need it. 

Women and Children admitted to the State Infirmary during the Year ending 

November 30, 1930. 



Ages of Ad 



Under 1 
1 to 7 
8 to 16 
17 to 21 
Over 21 



Total admissions .... 

Sources of Admission. 
Under 1: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Boards of Health ..... 

Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

Division of Child Guardianship 



to 7: 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Boards of Health . 

Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

Division of Child Guardianship 



8 to 16: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Boards of Health 

Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Industrial School for Girls 

Industrial Schools for Boys 

State Farm ...... 



17 to 21: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Boards of Health .... 

Institutions Registration Department 
Boston ...... 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Industrial School for Girls 

Industrial Schools for Boys 

State Schools for Feeble-minded 

Reformatory for Women 

Other institutions .... 



Over 21: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Boards of Health ..... 

Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

State Schools for Feeble-minded 

Reformatory for Women 

Other institutions ..... 



76 

35 

52 

142 

385 

690 



70 



35 



13 

16 
3 

1 

52 

56 
6 

50 
2 

15 
5 
2 
5 
1 

142 

190 
10 

153 

4 

22 



Diseases at Admission. 
Under 1: 
Infancy 
Tuberculosis . 
Gonorrhea 
Syphilis 

Feeble-mindedness 
Miscellaneous diseases 
No disease 



to 7: 

Tuberculosis . 
Gonorrhea 
Syphilis 

Feeble-mindedness 
Mental observation 
Miscellaneous diseases 
No disease 



8 to 16: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Pregnancy 

Mental observation 

Miscellaneous diseases 



17 to 21: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Pregnancy 

Miscellaneous diseases 

Mental observation 

No disease 



Over 21: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Pregnancy 

Cancer . 

Mental observation 

Arteriosclerosis 

Epilepsy 

Morphine 

Miscellaneous diseases 

Feeble-mindedness 

No disease 



22 

18 

2 

59 

39 

1 

1 

142 



385 



385 

Births, 147 (136 illegitimate — Illegitimate). 
Deaths, 483 (113 women and 47 children). 



16 



Men admitted to the State Infirmary during the Year 



P. D. 17 

November 30, 1930. 



21 to 40 
41 to 60 
Over 60 



Ages at Admission. 



323 
1,003 



2,215 



Sources of Admission. 
21 to 40: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Boards of Health ..... 

Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

House of Correction .... 



41 to 60: 

Boards of Public Health 
Boards of Health . 
Institutions Registration 
Boston 



Over 60: 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Boards of Health . 
Institutions Registration 
Boston 



Department, 



L32 

19 



171 
1 

323 



U2 



;,s.-, 



Department, 



1.01)3 



152 

1 

136 



Diseases at Admiss 
21 to 40: 
Tuberculosi 
Gonorrhea 
Syphilis 
Alcoholism 
Cancer . 
Mental 
Morphine 
Blind . 

Miscellaneous diseases 
No disease 



41 to 60: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Alcoholism 

Arteriosclerosis 

Cancer . 

Mental 

Morphine 

Blind . 

Miscellaneous diseases 

No disease 



Over 60: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Alcoholism 

Arteriosclerosis 

Cancer . 

Mental 

Blind . 

Miscellaneous diseases 

No disease 



99 

40 

10 

5 

1 
2 
1 
1 
159 
5 

323 

76 

8 

12 

70 

40 

6 

4 

1 

2 

758 

20 

1,003 

23 
1 
5 

29 
370 

20 

1 

3 

425 

12 

889 



Men discharged from the State Infirmary during the Year ending November 30, 1930. 



To relatives .... 
To place of settlement 

To Court 

To employment 

To other states 

To other countries 

Deported by United States Immigration 



110 
86 

54 

25 

6 

1 



To other institutions . 
Insane Ward (commitments) 
Without investigation but interviewed 
Absconded . 



Social Service for Men. 



Number of men admitted to the State Infirmary .... 

Number of cases receiving social service consideration (short service, 438; in 
Miscellaneous services to patients in wards ..... 

Number of men discharged ........ 

Number of men discharged without investigation, but interviewed 
Social service cases supervised in community ..... 

Employment found ..... ... 

Number of men assisted in community while looking for work 



e service, 125) 



17 

23 

588 

496 

1,408 



2,215 

563 

2.500 

1,408 

588 

16 

50 

200 



Women and Children discharged from State Infirmary during Year ending 

November 30, 1930, 



Discharged to: 

Relatives (203 women and 8 children) 

Husband ..... 

Employment .... 

Employment with child (20 children) . 

Private agencies .... 

Place of Settlement 

Deported by United States Immigration (16 
women and 3 children) 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Girls Parole Department (17 women and 6 
children) ..... 

Boys Industrial School 



J! I 
47 
47 
10 
12 
35 

19 
84 

23 
8 



Boards of Health . 

Court 

Reformatory for Women (14 women and 10 

children) .... 
Sanatoria .... 
State Schools for Feeble-minded 
Other states .... 
Insane Ward of State Infirmary 
Other institutions . 
Absconded (57 women and 5 children) 



Summary of Court Work. 



Warrants on illegitimacy complaint .... 

Cases appealed to Superior Court .... 

Adjudications of paternity ..... 

Agreements for support of illegitimate children . 
Adoption of children (by relatives, 1); (by strangers, 1) 
Commitments to schools for feeble-minded 
Conservatorships ....... 

Money collected for support of illegitimate children . 
Money paid out for support of illegitimate children 
Number of accounts for illegitimate children 
Balance on hand for illegitimate children, Nov. 30, 1930 



3 

14 

24 
8 
7 

17 

17 
2 

62 

680 



$7,486 43 

$3,649 62 

70 

$17,494 42 



Pt. I. 



17 



Summary of Placement Work. 



Persons under active supervision, Nov. 30 

1930 

96 mothers with 96 children at work 
77 mothers boarding children in 
foster homes .... 
Other women and girls under super- 
vision ..... 
Other children under supervision 
Girls temporarily in institutions 
Visits to girls in own homes 
Visits to girls at employment 
Visits to girls elsewhere ... 
Visits of girls to clinics of hospitals . 
Cases referred to private agencies 
Children referred for supervision to Division 
of Child Guardianship 



192 



119 
24 
17 



429 



368 
121 



285 
6 



26 



Girls over 21, accepted for supervision from 
Division of Child Guardianship and Girls 
Parole Department .... 12 

Adoptions — (relatives, 1; strangers, 1) . 2 

Marriages ...... 14 

Recidivists ...... 5 

Replacements — (with baby, 42; without 

baby, 52) 94 

Places of employment investigated . . 96 

Fifty-six savings accounts for girls at 

work $7,840 06 

Applications at office — 

(Transportation, 238; placement for 
mother and baby, 33) 271 



General Summary. 

Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary ........ 690 

Births at the State Infirmary 147 

Women and children discharged from the State Infirmary ........ 680 

Deaths at the State Infirmary 483 

Women and children discharged directly to other divisions ........ 146 

Women and children discharged by the subdivision of social service ...... 534 

Men admitted to the State Infirmary ........... 2,215 

Men discharged by the subdivision of social service ......... 1,408 

Applications for assistance at office . . . . . . . . . . . .271 

Persons under supervision in the community, Nov. 30, 1930 ....... 429 

Total number assisted by the Subdivision of Social Service during the year ending Nov. 30, 1930 3,805 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 

Miss Winifred A. Keneran, Director. 
Children in Care and Custody of the Division. 

The number of children in the care and custody of the Division of Child Guar- 
dianship on December 1, 1929, was 6,135. There were 1,267 new children received 
during the ensuing year, viz.: 535 dependent, 628 neglected, 96 delinquent, and 
8 wayward, making the total number for the year, 7,402. 

Nine hundred forty (940) children were discharged from custody, viz.: 423 
dependent, 424 neglected, 9 wayward, and 84 delinquent. On November 30, 
1930, therefore, there were in the care of the division, 6,462 x children: classified as 
dependent, 3,102; neglected, 3,157; wayward, 13; delinquent, 190. The increase 
in population for the year was 327 or 5.3%. 

These children were cared for as follows : Placed in families and fully supported 
by the Commonwealth, 4,442; in families and partly supported, 196; in families 
free of expense, 531; receiving wages, 790; in hospitals, 320; in United States 
service, 55; married, 45; whereabouts unknown, 83. 

A large majority of the children were born in Massachusetts or in one of the 
other New England States, but there are 117 of foreign birth, representing the 
following countries: Austria, 1; Russia, 3; Hawaii, 1; Italy, 25; Greece, 4; 
Armenia, 2; Poland, 6; Portugal, 5; Finland, 1; Syria, 1; China, 1; Canada, 48; 
England, 14; Mexico, 1; Scotland, 4. 

Fifteen hundred ninety-one (1,591) were children of foreign-born parents and 
1,351 had one parent of alien birth. 

There are 390 colored children under care. 

The number of known illegitimate children is 1,591 or approximately 25% of 
the total number supported. This proportion varies little from year to year. 

Two hundred forty-five (245) of our children are full orphans. In 1,073 cases 
the mother is dead and in 498 cases, the father. 



1 In addition to these 6,462 children, the Department had under its supervision and visitation November 
30, 1930, 488 boys at the Lyman School for Boys; 305 girls at the Industrial School for Girls; 315 boys at 
the Industrial School for Boys; 2,675 boys and 664 girls in the custody of the Trustees of the Massachu- 
setts Training Schools, outside the schools; 112 boys and 100 girls, patients at the Massachusetts Hospital 
School; and 177 children, patients at the State Infirmary, who are either young infants with their mothers 
or else under hospital treatment, making a total of 11,308 children in the care and custody or under the 
supervision of the department. There were also 1,187 children supported at the expense of cities and towns 
who were subject to the department's visitation, reported upon at page 53. 



18 P. D. 17 

Children Received. 

The number of applications for admission to support continues to increase and 
this year we received 96 more than in the previous year. The following figures 
show the fluctuation in the number of applications received for the past ten years. 
They also give the number of children received under the provisions of General 
Laws, chapter 119, section 38, as compared with the number of applications for 
the same period. 

New Children Percent New Children Percent 



Year 


Applications 


Accepted 


Accepted 


Year 


Applications 


Accepted 


Accepted 


1920-21 


1,220 


321 


26.3 


1925-26 


1,096 


307 


28.0 


1921-22 


1,149 


329 


28.7 


1926-27 


1,162 


263 


22.6 


1922-23 


1,026 


257 


25.1 


1927-28 


1,338 


303 


22.6 


1923-24 


1,016 


304 


29.9 


1928-29 


1,267 


334 


26.4 


1924-25 


1,033 


351 


33.9 


1929-30 


1,363 


359 


26.3 



The industrial depression which is acutely felt at this time, causing lack of 
employment to great numbers of people, has slighth r affected the number of appli- 
cations and the number of children received during the past two years, but, as 
the cause of breaking up a family is never dependency alone, there is not so great 
an increase here as might naturally be expected. 

The contributions to support from parents and relatives show a falling-off of 
$3,528.30, which may be attributed to unemployment. These collections for the 
past year amounted to $30,381.87, while $33,910.17 was contributed the previous 
year. 

Infants Under Care. 

The number of children under three years of age on December 1, 1929, was 466. 
Three hundred thirty-six (336) were received, making the total number supported 
during the year, 802. This number includes 16 foundlings who were committed 
under provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, section 22, and 8 infants removed 
from unsuitable boarding homes under the provisions of section 28 of the same 
chapter. 

Two hundred twenty-two (222) infants were transferred to the sub-division for 
older children at the age of three, 17 died, 4 were legally adopted, 36 were discharged 
to parents and relatives, 24 were discharged to court, and 9 were discharged to 
places of settlement, so that on November 30, 1930, there were 490 infants under 
care. 

Five nurses made 9,447 visits to infants placed in foster homes. This number 
includes 6,176 visits to our infant wards and 3,271 visits of inspection, investigation, 
and supervision of licensed boarding homes and infants boarded privately. 

Mortality Rate in Detail. 

Birth to one year ......... 

One year to two years ........ 

Two years to three years ........ 

S02 17 2.12% 

It will be noted that the total number of infants, 802, under care for the year is 
83 greater than that of the previous year and is the largest number we have had 
to report. The rate of mortality for the whole group (2.12%), is the lowest thus 
far reported. This is also true in the case of children under one year of age, — 
mortality rate 4.1%. 

Details of Mortality of Infants under One Year of Age, 

Placed in Hospitals. 

Length of Time 
Under Care in Hospital Age at Death Cause 



Under Care 
195 
246 
361 


Died 
8 
7 
2 


Rate 

4.10% 

2.84% 

.55% 



OS. 


Days 


Mos. 


Days 


Mos. 


Days 




3 


19 


_ 


18 


6 


21 


Syphilis 


1 


9 


1 


o 


1 


22 


Intestinal Grippe 


2 


21 


- 


2 


4 


— 


Illiocolitis 




6 




6 


2 


18 


Chronic Intestinal Indigestion 
and Atrophy of Cerebral Cor- 
tex 


- 


12 


- 


12 


4 


7 


Hydrocephalus 


1 


23 


1 


23 


2 


10 


Spina Bifida 



Pt.l. 



19 









Boarded in Foster 


Homes 










Under Care 




Age at Death 




Ca 


ase 






Mos. 


Days 




Mos. 


Days 








A. 






5 




8 


6 




Gastro 


-enteritis 


B 




- 


8 




1 


15 




Lobar-pneumonia 




Details of Mortality of Infants Between One and Three Years of Age. 








Placed 


in Hospitals 














Length of Time 












Under 


Care 




n Hospital 


Age at Death 


Cause 




Yrs. Mos 


Days 


Yrs 


Mos. 


Days 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


Days 




A 


1 


4 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


16 


Illiocolitis 


B 


11 


6 


_ 


— 


1 


1 


6 


29 


Pneumonia 


C 


10 


5 


- 


- 


1 


1 


4 


12 


Pneumonia and Con- 
vulsions 


D 


2 


13 


- 


2 


13 


1 


- 


3 


Hydrocephalus and 
Hilum Tuberculosis 


E 


7 


5 


- 


7 


5 


2 


6 


23 


Tuberculosis 


F 


11 


2 


- 


11 


2 


1 


6 


12 


Measles and Bronchial 
Pneumonia 


G 


1 6 


14 


1 


5 


28 


9 


1 


4 


Measles and Idiocy 


H 


4 


28 


- 


4 


28 


1 


- 


23 


Idiocy and pneumonia 


I 


7 


27 


" 


7 


27 


1 


1 


25 


Microcephalus and 
Convulsions 



Nine (9) of the infants in the above table died at the State Infirmary, 6 in local 
hospitals, and 2 in foster homes. 

The following table shows the rate of mortality among infants under three years, 
also under one year — for the past ten-year period : 















Under One Year 


Under Three 


Years 




Total 


Died 


Percentage 


Total 


Died 


Percentage 


1921 


170 


16 


9.41 


614 


30 


4.88 


1922 












155 


9 


5.8 


588 


20 


3.4 


1923 












106 


9 


8.5 


616 


20 


3.2 


1924 












98 


6 


6.12 


571 


13 


2.27 


1925 












98 


15 


15.3 


592 


22 


3.7 


1926 












110 


o 


4.5 


637 


16 


2.5 


1927 












131 


8 


6.1 


531 


6 


2.1 


1928 












86 


9 


10.45 


645 


18 


2.79 


1929 












97 


11 


11.3 


719 


21 


2.92 


1930 












195 


8 


4.1 


802 


17 


2.12 



Children over Three Years of Age. 

In the children's group there are 2,875 boys and girls between the ages of 3 and 
12 years. Two additional visitors were appointed during the year, and there are 
now eighteen visitors in this group. As will be seen, each worker must care for 
an average number of 160 children, which is too great a load. We hope that by 
the appointment of additional visitors a better adjustment can be made and the 
visitor can be enabled to give to each child the individual attention which his case 
requires. 

During the year 1,960 foster-home applications for children were received, — 
490 for older girls, 55 for older boys, 1,145 for children, and 270 for babies. 

We attribute to the financial depression the fact that we are receiving fewer 
applications offering wage, free, or partly free homes. It is particularly difficult 
to find homes of this class for our older boys. It is well known that there is little 
or no opportunity for them in industry at the present time, and the farmers in 
general are not hiring any help. This makes it necessary for us to pay board for a 
large number of these older boys who under other conditions would be self- 
supporting. 

We have been fortunate in securing boarding homes of a high standard for 
younger children, especially for single children. Investigation of an unusually 
large number of prospective foster homes reveals the fact that many people having 
no income at present have sought to board children and thus help their situation. 
Such homes could not be considered. 



20 P. D. 17 

Four hundred seventy-six (476) of the total number were found suitable and 
approved, as follows: For older girls, 150; for older boys, 32; for children, 244; 
for babies, 50. 

In the group of girls between the ages of 12 and 21 years, we have 1,464, an in- 
crease of 101 over the number in care December 1, 1929. One new visitor was 
appointed January 1, 1930. Fifteen visitors are now caring for an average of 88 
girls each. 

The majority of girls not in school are employed at housework at a wage varying 
from $4 to $12 a week. Two hundred forty-seven (247) girls are in high school; 
73 of them are earning board and clothes, 89 board only with this division con- 
tinuing to pay for clothing; 7 are in trade schools, taking courses in millinery, 
commercial art, hair-dressing, etc.; 15 are training to be nurses; 7 are in normal 
school, 1 in art school, 4 in business college, and 2 in college. 

Forty-one (41) girls have married during the year and are established in homes 
of their own. 

Seventy-two (72) girls who reached their majority had savings of from $4.10 
to $650.38, showing a total of $11,853.91. 

We are noting a gradual change in the character of the foster home, and with 
it the disappearance of the old-fashioned New England foster mother. In her 
place has come the modern young housewife with her apartment dwelling, club 
life, and varied interests outside the home. Hand-in-hand with this condition, 
our high school girls are trying to meet the demand for more and more extravagant 
dress and a desire to participate in the clubs and plays of the school in an effort 
to be on a par with their more fortunate mates. Add to this the sex problems of 
today and the oft-encountered apathy towards religion, and one may have some 
idea of this increasingly difficult problem. 

The character of new girls received here for care reflects the spirit of the times. 
Whereas formerly these girls were more or less unsophisticated, they are today 
frequently more worldly-wise than their prospective foster mothers. 

There are 1,538 boys between the ages of 12 and 21 years under the supervision 
of 15 men visitors. Included in this group are (A) 409 boys who are under 14 
years of age, and (B) 1,129 who are over 14 years. Four hundred forty-eight (448) 
of this number are attending school, as follows: 

Elementary Schools .... 226 Preparatory School .... 1 

Junior High Schools .... 83 Colleges ...... 5 

High Schools 132 Business College ..... 1 

In addition to the above, 8 boys are students in evening classes at business colleges, 
15 are at trade schools, and 47 are pupils at the Wayside Inn Trade School for 
Boys at South Sudbury. Ten (10) boys, having completed the course at this 
school, are now receiving training in the Ford School at Detroit. Reports of their 
scholarship and progress are received regularly and indicate that their work is 
satisfactory. 

The Wayside Inn Trade School for Boys at South Sudbury is in its third year 
and offers to fifty of our boys, ages 12 to 15, a wonderful opportunity. The experi- 
ment is now evidently upon its way to very great success. With fourteen teachers, 
full-time or part-time, it gives a large variety of practical and interesting educational 
projects in such excellent home surroundings that it may be said to be a new 
combination of educational methods and ideals. That its methods are successful 
is quite evident from the great change which it has made in the boys' interest .and 
appearance, and this form of training is obviously producing excellent results. 

_ The state is fortunate to be the beneficiary of Mr. Ford's experiment, and to 
give such an opportunity to boys under the care of this division is a very important 
contribution to our work, not only in caring for and developing these particular 
boys, but as a demonstration of what is possible. 

Wage boys have chosen many and varied types of employment. The largest 
number (168) are on farms, 76 are in mills and factories, 39 in stores, and 16 in 
offices. The others are employed in many and varied kinds of unskilled labor. 

The Feeble-Minded Group. 
In the process of caring for nearly 7,000 children, recognition of the presence 
of many mentally deficient children is inevitable, and the development of a 



Pt. I. 21 

separate unit has been found necessary in order that the recommendations of the 
psychiatrist may be carried out and a special program arranged, based on an under- 
standing of the needs of the mentally handicapped child at home, in the commu- 
nity, and in industry. 

On December 1, 1929, there were 148 children in this group, and during the year 
182 were added, having been transferred by their visitors who, observing their 
inability to adjust to their environment, sought the aid of the Walter E. Fernald 
State School at Waverly and found the solution of the problem in the doctors' 
diagnosis of mental defect. This makes a total of 330 children, many of whom 
were the type requiring institutional care. Contact was made with the three 
state schools for the care of the feeble-minded, resulting in the commitment of 
55 girls and 15 boys to the school at Belchertown, 6 girls and 15 boys to the Walter 
E. Fernald State School, and 1 girl and 6 boys to the Wrentham State School, 
making a total of 98 commitments during the year. 

At the end of the year, there remain in this group 241 children, of whom 100 
boys and girls are receiving foster-home care. With a few exceptions, these boys 
and girls are attending school where special class work is available, hand-work 
being stressed and scholastic subjects given to the extent commensurate with 
their mental equipment. 

Thirty (30) girls are employed at domestic work in private homes, earning 
wages ranging from $3.50 to $8.00 a week. Each girl has a bank account and 
deposits are made regularly. The visitor and employer confer frequently, resulting 
in co-operative supervision of the girl. 

Twelve (12) boys and 1 girl are placed at the Hospital Cottages for Children at 
Baldwinville, most of them having a physical as well as a mental handicap. Special 
class work is available and it is expected that these children will later be committed 
to one of the state schools for the feeble-minded. 

There are 18 boys and 12 girls at the Waverly and Wrentham Schools who are 
receiving training but have not been legally committed; some of this group may 
later be returned for placement in the community. 

At the State Infirmary, there are 22 boys and 20 girls. During the year, 4 girls 
were removed from this institution and committed to state schools; 3 girls were 
placed at wages in the community; and 4 boys were placed in foster homes. The 
majority of cases now at the Infirmary are of the idiot and imbecile classification 
awaiting an opportunity for admission to the state schools for the feeble-minded. 

Nine (9) boys and 16 girls were placed at the Monson State Hospital for the 
treatment of epilepsy. 

Subdivision of Investigation. 

Investigations made during the year by the Subdivision of Investigation cul- 
minated in the discharge of 151 children. Many of these were the result of family- 
follow-up which revealed the fact that dependency no longer existed and that the 
parents had suitable homes for the children. In some cases a parent had remarried 
and established a home, but a little pressure was needed to make him realize that 
the children should take their places in that home. Without a little pressure of 
this sort they are often too willing to allow the arrangement to continue under 
which we are boarding the children as long as they can visit them and are free 
from personal responsibility. 

The subdivision finds that the question of settlement sometimes complicates a 
situation. The settlement may change with the marriage of the mother so as to 
impose the obligation upon a new city or town. It is only in rare instances that 
the local boards fail to co-operate with the decisions of this division. In cases 
where the local authorities demand a discharge to an unapproved home, it is our 
policy to deliver the children to the authorities and not to the parents. 

Many abandoned children find their way to the care of this division. Often the 
parents are located and a way is planned for them to provide for their children 
under our supervision. In flagrant cases this may be accomplished by court 
action, although it is often done entirely by friendly contact. 

The ordinary work of the subdivision in reuniting families is illustrated by a case 
where the court had removed the children from the parents for neglect because of 
the drunkenness of the father and the inability of the mother to carry on under 



22 P. D. 17 

his intimidations. ^ After the children had been in our custody for some time, the 
father was killed in an accident and the mother was visited and made aware of 
the possibility of obtaining her children, Eventually with the assistance of 
Mothers' Aid the mother and children were reunited. 

It also happens occasionally that when children are found to have legal residence 
in some other state, the subdivision obtains the necessary data and makes arrange- 
ments for their transfer. If continued home supervision should be considered 
necessary, arrangements are often made whereby local organizations assume this 
responsibility. 

In court committed cases, whether neglected or delinquent, it is considered 
inadvisable to discharge the children outright. They are allowed to remain at 
home under close supervision of the visitor. If, after a year's trial in their own 
home, conditions remain satisfactory, the children may be formally discharged. 
During this trial period, the visitor may remove them at any time if the situation 
works out badly. Dependent children are usually discharged at once and taken 
back only by means of a new application. 

In an application for the return of children, the first step is to ascertain whether 
or not the condition which caused removal has been remedied. Then follows an 
investigation of the general home conditions and of the ability to support. 

The following are the statistics of the Subdivision of Investigation: 

Applications pending December 1, 1929 ......... 410 

Applications received December 1, 1929, to November 30, 1930 (involving 141 re- 
applications) ............. 1,363 

Total 1,773 

Applications withdrawn ............ 92 

Advised only .............. 23 

Assumed by relath es ........... . 365 

Assumed by private agencies .......... 70 

Assumed by public agencies ........... 372 

Received Section 38, Chapter 119, General Laws ....... 359 

Pending December 1, 1930 492 

Total .... 1.773 

Applications for discharge pending December 1, 1929 ... 62 

Applications for discharge received December 1, 1929, to November 30, 1930 . . 187 

Total 249 

Disposition as follows: 

Discharged ... .......... 151 

Refused 19 

Withdrawn 19 

Pending December 1 , 1930 60 

Total 249 

After Care. 

Cases pending December 1, 1929 .......... 32 

Cases added December 1, 1929, to November 30, 1930 53 

Total 85 

Dispositions as follows: 

Cases closed ............. 33 

Investigation leads to discharge .......... 8 

Withdrawn ............. 1 

Pending December 1, 1930 43 

Total 85 

Adoptions. 

Applications for children for adoption: 

Pending at beginning of year .......... 12 

New applications ............ 92 

104 

Disapproved without investigation ......... 10 

Withdrawn 19 

Investigated ............. 68 

Pending .............. 7 

104 

Homes investigated: 

Approved .............. 39 

Disapproved ............. 29 

68 

Twenty-six (26) children have been placed for adoption during the year. Twenty- 
five (25) children have been adopted — 12 girls and 13 boys. The oldest child 



Pt. I. 



23 



Barnstable 


1 


Middlesex . 


Bristol .... 


3 


Norfolk 


Essex .... 


3 


Plymouth . 


Hampden .... 


1 


Suffolk 


Hampshire 


1 


Worcester . 



adopted was a girl twenty years old and the youngest a girl fifteen months old. 
There are now on trial for adoption 41 children. 

The twenty-five adoptions allowed during the year were granted in the following 
counties : 

5 

3 

i 

4 

3 

The usual satisfactory results were observed in the adoption work of the Depart- 
ment. Each adoption was carefully investigated by the Department and in each 
case evidence was produced before the court to the effect that it would be for the 
best interests of the child that the adoption be allowed. In this way many children 
have permanent homes and recognized places in the community. 

Collections received from Cities and Tovms and directly from Parents. 



1913 . 

1914 . 

1915 . 

1916 . 

1917 . 

1918 . 

1919 . 

1920 . 

1921 . 

1922 . 

1923 . 

1924 . 

1925 . 

1926 . 

1927 . 

1928 . 

1929 . 

1930 . 

Summary of Children under Three Years of Age in Custody during the Year. 





Cities and 




Direct 


Towns 


Total 


$6,999 30 


$9,240 71 


$16,240 01 


8,017 75 


11,496 87 


19,514 62 


7,106 88 


17,959 41 


25,066 29 


12,528 02 


21,828 07 


34,356 09 


16,620 52 


24,651 03 


41,271 55 


25,936 02 


28,545 45 


54,481 47 


34,084 65 


44,816 77 


78,901 42 


41,492 42 


57,433 73 


98,926 15 


33,258 83 


62,771 26 


96,030 09 


29,847 30 


62,623 99 


92,471 29 


31,800 51 


83,775 21 


115,575 72 


32,779 61 


77,703 60 


110,483 21 


29,521 11 


88,827 06 


118,348 17 


30,357 82 


112,790 55 


143,148 37 


30,947 17 


119,954 97 


150,902 14 


28,388 42 


134,348 16 


162,736 58 


33,910 17 


133,944 65 


167,854 82 


30,381 87 


147,683 38 


178,065 25 





Dependent 


Neglected 






Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Grand 
Total 


Number Dec. 1, 1929 

Received Dec. 1, 1929, to Nov. 30, 1930 

Total number in charge 
Number transferred to division for 

older children . ... 
Number discharged and died 


194 
122 
316 

85 
33 


146 

93 

239 

70 

22 


340 
215 
555 

155 
55 


64 

66 

130 

32 

24 


62 

55 

117 

35 
11 


126 
121 

247 

67 
35 


466 
336 
802 

222 
90 


Number remaining Dec. 1, 1930 . 


198 


147 


345 


74 


71 


145 


490 



24 



P. D. 17 



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Pt. I. 



25 



Disposition of Children held on Temporary Mittimi, pending further Order of the 

Court. 







Received 


Perma- 








Dis- 






Pending 


During 


nently 








charged 


Pending 




Dec. 1, 


the 


Com- 


Died 


Bailed 


Defaulted 


to 


Dec. 1, 




1929 


Year 


mitted 








Court 


1930 


Neglected 


94 


311 


134 


3 


12 


1 


140 


115 


Wayward 


— 


7 


— 


— 


1 


— 


6 


- 


Delinquent 


5 


53 


13 





7 


2 


34 


2 


Total 


99 


371 


147 


3 


20 


3 


180 


117 



Status of Children over Three Years of Age in Custody during the Year ending 

November 30, 1930. 







Girls 


Boys 


In families, receiving wages 




378 


412 


In families, free of expense to Commonwealth ....... 


224 


295 


In families, clothing only provided . 




151 


45 


In families, board and clothing provided 




1,813 


2,163 


In hospitals ..... 




160 


148 


In United States Service 




— 


55 


Married ..... 




39 


6 


Whereabouts unknown . 


, 1930 


29 


54 


Total number in charge November 30 


2,794 


3,178 


Died 




6 


9 


Of age ...... 




113 


136 


Transferred to Lyman School for Boys 




- 


6 


Transferred to Industrial School for Girls 




5 


— 


Transferred to Industrial School for Boys 




_ 


2 


Committed to Lvman School for Boys 




- 


21 


Committed to Industrial School for Girls 




9 


— 


Committed to Industrial School for Boys 




- 


14 


Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory 


, Concord ...... 


— 


1 


Committed to Reformatory for Women, Sherborn ..... 


3 


- 


Committed to other correctional institutio 


ns . . . 


- 


2 


Committed to Department of Mental Diseases . . . . 


63 


35 


Adopted ..... 




9 


12 


Discharged to places of settlement . 




11 


10 


Otherwise discharged 


ear ....... 


139 


244 


Total number in custody during the y 


3,152 


3,670 


Applications for 


Discharge of Children to Relatives. 








^ending New Granted 




Pending 




Dec. 1, Applica- Granted Condi- Refused 


With- 


Dec. 1, 




1929 tions tionally 


drawn 


1930 


Neglected ..... 


41 147 9 79 79 


8 


13 


Wayward ...... 


3 - 1 


- 


2 


Delinquent ...... 


3 23 1 14 8 


1 


2 


General Laws, ch. 119, sect. 22 


4 40 31 6 


4 


3 


General Laws, ch. 119, sect. 38 


14 155 83 32 21 


11 


22 


Total 


62 368 124 131 109 


24 


•42 



Disposition of Delinquent and Wayward Children by the Courts. 

Number of Court notices received . .... 

Disposition of cases attended: 

Committed to 

Lyman School for Boys ........... 239 

Lyman School for Boys and appealed ......... 54 

Lyman School for Boys and sentence suspended . . . . . . . 379 

Industrial School for Boys ........... 187 

Industrial School for Boys and appealed ......... 73 

Industrial School for Boys and sentence suspended ....... 439 

Industrial School for Girls . . . . . . . . . . .112 

Industrial School for Girls and appealed ......... 4 

Industrial School for Girls and sentence suspended ....... 61 

Department of Public Welfare .......... 53 

Department of Public Welfare and appealed ........ 1 

Department of Public Welfare and sentence suspended ...... 3 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston ......... 2 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston, and sentence suspended .... 1 

Massachusetts Reformatory ........... 9 

Massachusetts Reformatory and appealed ........ 3 

Massachusetts Reformatory and sentence suspended ...... 8 



5,998 



26 P. D. 17 

Plummer Farm School and sentence suspended ....... 3 

Reformatory for Women ........... 1 

Reformatory for Women and sentence suspended ....... 1 

Department for Defective Delinquents ......... 1 

County Training Schools ........... 69 

County Training Schools and appealed ......... 5 

County Training Schools and sentence suspended ..... . . 54 

House of Correction and sentence suspended ........ 1 

Jail 1 

Jail and sentence suspended ............ l 

Held for Grand Jury ............. 37 

Probation .............. 2,415 

Fined 180 

Fined and appealed .............. 17 

Fine suspended ............. 69 

Continued .............. 1,384 

Continued in care of Department of Public Welfare ....... 42 

Failed to appear .............. 148 

Discharged .............. 325 

Dismissed .............. 376 

Filed 1,345 

Appealed from finding ............ 30 

Total number of cases attended .......... 8,133 

Disposition of Neglected Children by the Courts. 

Number of Court notices received .......... 1.053 

Disposition of cases attended: 

Committed to 

Department of Public Welfare 386 

Department of Public Welfare and appealed ........ 17 

Department of Public Welfare and sentence suspended ...... 32 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 47 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston, and sentence suspended .... 4 

Board of Public Welfare, Gardner .......... 1 

Placed on file 33 

Discharged .............. 6 

Dismissed .............. 76 

Continued . . 776 

Continued and placed in Home for Destitute Catholic Children ..... 40 

Continued in care of Department of Public Welfare ....... 307 

Failed to appear ............. 13 

Appealed from finding ............ 12 

Total number of cases attended .......... 1,750 



Localities from which New Children were Received. 



Abington, 5 
Amesbury, 10 
Arlington, 1 
Ashburnham, 3 
Attleboro, 12 
Barnstable, 5 
Beverly, 5 
Boston, 318 
Braintree, 1 
Brockton, ] 1 
Brookline, 3 
Burlington, 1 
Cambridge, 63 
Canton, 1 
Chelsea, 40 
Chester, 3 
Chicopee, 2 
Concord, 9 
Dedham, 2 
Easthampton, 1 
Edgartown, 1 
Erving, 1 
Everett, 7 
Fall River, 7 
Falmouth, 2 
Fitchburg, 14 



Foxborough, 1 
Framingham, 12 
Franklin, 17 
Gardner, 6 
Gloucester, 4 
Greenfield, 7 
Great Barrington, 2 
Hamilton, 3 
Hanover, 1 
Haverhill, 8 
Hingham, 10 
Holyoke, 31 
Hudson, 1 
Lawrence, 34 
Lexington, 4 
Lowell, 15 
Lunenburg, 1 
Lynn, 38 
Lynnfield, 3 
Maiden, 19 
Manchester, 1 
Marblehead, 5 
Marlborough, 2 
Marshfield, 3 
Meaford, 7 
Melrose, 2 



Middleborough, 2 
Milford, 4 
Natick, 5 
New Bedford, 14 
Newburyport, 14 
Newton, 7 
North Adams, 10 
North Reading, 3 
Northampton, 21 
North Attleborough, 
Northborough, 1 
Northbridge, 1 
Northfield, 1 
Norwood, 1 
Orange, 9 
Palmer, 1 
Peabody, 13 
Pittsfield, 26 
Plymouth, 1 
Quincy, 18 
Reading, 1 
Revere, 5 
Salem, 18 
Saugus, 10 
Sharon, 1 
Sherborn, 2 



Shrewsbury, 9 
Somerville, 12 
South Hadley, 1 
Southbridge, 2 
Springfield, 67 
Stoneham, 1 
Taunton, 27 
Templeton, 1 
Tewksbury, 36 
Uxbridge, 1 
Wakefield, 4 
Walpole, 4 
Waltham, 9 
Wareham, 6 
Watertown, 1 
Webster, 7 
Wendell, 1 
Westfield, 7 
Westwood, 7 
Weymouth, 3 
Wilmington, 1 
Winchester, 2 
Woburn, 5 
Worcester, 96 
Worthington, 2 

Total, 1,267 



Licensed Boarding Homes for Infants. 
During the last official year 671 licenses to maintain boarding homes for infants 
were granted under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, section 2, in 108 
cities and towns, in addition to the 547 licenses in force at the expiration of the 
previous year; 535 expired by the one-year limitation, 5 were revoked, and 594 
licenses permitting the boarding of 1,205 infants in 105 cities and towns remained 
in force November 30, 1930. Sixty (60) applications were withdrawn and 12 
were refused. 



Pt. I. 



27 



These represent the licensed homes, not only of infants under the supervision of 
the Commonwealth, but also of those under the age of two years placed out by 
parents and many private agencies. 

It has been necessary to take court action in private cases where laws governing 
the protection of infants (chapter 119) were wilfully violated, and strict super- 
vision is being kept in many instances. 

The inspector of infant boarding homes made 254 visits during the year, super- 
vising boarding homes and investigating complaints. Eight (8) babies were 
removed under the provisions of chapter 119, section 28. 

Summary of Infants under Tvjo Years of Age reported to the Department of Public 
Welfare from December 1, 1929, to November 30, 1980, under General Laws, 
Chapter 119, which provides for the Protection of Infants and the Licensing and 
Regulating of Boarding Homes for them. 

Number of 
Supervision of — Infants 

ReDorted 



Avon Home, Cambridge .... 

Bethlehem Home, Taunton .... 

Board of Public Welfare, Arlington 

Board of Public Welfare, Maiden . 

Board of Public Welfare, Middleborough 

Board of Public Welfare, New Bedford . 

Board of Public Welfare, Needham 

Board of Public Welfare, Palmer 

Board of Public Welfare, Springfield 

Board of Public Welfare, Worcester 

Boston Children's Aid Association . 

Boston Children's Friend Society . 

Brockton Catholic Charities Centre 

Brockton Family Welfare Society . 

Catholic Charitable Bureau, Boston 

Catholic Welfare Bureau of Fall River 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston . 

Child Welfare Division, Concord, New Hampshire 

Child Welfare House, Lynn .... 

Children's Mission to Children, Boston . 

Church Home Society, Boston 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Aid and Relief 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Child Guardianshp 

Evangeline Booth Hospital, Boston 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Boston . 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Lowell . 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Swampscott 

Girls' Parole Department, Boston .... 

Girls' Welfare Society, Woicester .... 

Guild of St. Agnes, Worcester .... 

Hampaen County Children's Aid Association . 
HolyoKe Children's Aid Society 

Home for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield 
House of Mercy, Boston ..... 

Jewish Chilaren's Bureau ..... 

Jewish Social Service Buieau ..... 

Lawrence Catholic Charities Centre 

Lawrence City Mission ...... 

Lowell Catholic Charitable Bureau . 

Lynn Catholic Charities Centre 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Be* erly 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Orange 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Quincy 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Taunton 

National Council of Jewish Women 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield 

Northampton Children's Aid Society 

Private ....... 

Probation Officers ..... 

St. Mary's Infant Asylum, Boston . 
Salem Catholic Charities Centre 
Sisters of Providence, Holyoke 

Social Sen-ice Department, Boston Lying-in Hospital 
Somerville Catholic Charities Centre 
Talitha Cumi Home and Hospital, Boston 
Temporary Home and Day Nursery, Worcester 
Wachusett Children's Aid Society, Fitchburg . 
Welfare Worker, Wm. Filene's Sons Company 
Winchendon District Nurse Committee . 
Worcester Child Welfare Society 
Worcester Children's Friend Society 



21 

7 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
4 

16 
135 

32 



280 
5 

93 
1 

19 
4 

33 

2 

441 

16 
110 

10 

17 
2 
5 
7 

42 
5 

28 
2 

19 
2 
7 
1 

31 

37 
1 
1 
2 
5 
1 

12 

50 

8 

6 

1,241 

13 
185 

27 

72 
1 

12 

49 
8 

17 
1 
1 
1 

42 

3,205 



28 P. D. 17 

The actual number of infants reported, less duplication of supervision, was 3,144. 
Of this number 42 died and 37 were adopted. 

Licensed Lying-in Hospitals, 1929-1930. 

Licenses in force Dec. 1, 1929 (in 98 towns) ......... 201 

Expired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 

Surrendered and cancelled ............ 8 

Revoked ................ 

115 

Continuing in force .............. 86 

Reissues ............... 97 

New issues .............. 12 

109 

Licenses in force Nov. 30, 1930 (in 94 towns) 195 

Corporations ................. 125 

Physicians .............. 23 

Nurses 29 

Boards of Public Welfare . . . l . . . . . 4 

Other persons ... . . . . . . . . . . .14 

195 

There were 159 visits of inspection to hospitals and 25 visits to investigate 
complaints. 

Homes for convalescent, chronic, and the aged are no longer licensed to care for 
maternity cases. It is unfair to those seeking quiet and rest to be annoyed by the 
disturbances that go with maternity work and the crying of babies, and most 
unfair to the new mother to be so closely associated with chronic cases. 

The returns from a questionnaire mailed to each licensee show 42,100 cases 
delivered in 195 hospitals:' — death of mothers, 272; death of babies, 1,267; still- 
births, 1,640. 

Two hundred seventy-three (273) notices of discharge from maternity hospitals 
of infants with inflamed eyes were received during the year. Seventeen of the 195 
hospitals reported eye infection. 

Prophylactic used in infants' eyes in every case was either silver nitrate 1 per 
cent or argyrol 15 to 20 per cent. 

Tuition of Children under the Care and Control of the Department. 
Under the operation of General Laws, chapter 76, sections 7 to 10, inclusive, as 
amended by Statutes of 1921, chapters 272 and 214, and Statutes of 1930, chapter 
290, governing reimbursements by the Commonwealth for tuition of state wards 
in public schools, bills received from 208 cities and towns, for the tuition and 
transportation of 3,149 children, amounting to $189,720.28 — viz., tuition, $172,- 
416.89; transportation, $17,303.39 — were audited by the department and paid 
by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth during the year ending November 30, 
1930. The location of the children was as follows: 

Abington, 15 Bolton, 12 Colrain, 10 Georgetown, 2 

Acton, 5 Boston, 193 Concord: - Gloucester, 6 

Adarrs, 4 Bourne, 6 1929, 10 i Grafton, 13 

Agawam, 9 Braintree, 1 1930, 11 Granby, 10 

Amesbury, 1 Brewster, 5 Conway: Granville, 5 

Amherst, 34 Bridgewater, 16 1929, 14 * Greenfield, 10 

Andovei, 17 Brimfield. 4 1930, 13 Groton, 11 

Arlington, 19 Brooicline. Cummington, 3 Groveland, 11 

Ashburnham, 1 1924, 1 2 Dana, 1 Hadley, 12 

Ashfield, 1 1925, 1 2 Danveis, 14 Hampden, 15 

Ashland: 1927, 1 2 Dedham, 18 Hanover, 3 

1929, 5 1928, 1 2 Dennis, 1 Hardwick, 9 

1930, 3 1929, 1 2 Douglas, 8 Harvard, 6 
Athol, 18 1930, 3 Dracut, 9 Harwich, 25 
Attleboro, 1 Buckland, 18 Dunstable, 4 Hawley, 43 
Ayer, 1 Burlington, 2 East Bridgewater, 13 Heath, 8 
Barnstable, 6 Cambridge, 91 Easthampton, 4 Hingham, 3 
Barre, 1 Canton, 11 Easton, 52 Hinsdale, 2 
Becket, 14 Carlisle, 7 Enfield, 23 Holbrook, 2 
Belchertown, 13 Carver, 1 Erving, 3 Holliston, 36 
Bellingham: Charlemont, 3 Everett, 21 Holyoke, 7 

1929, 12 ! Chatham, 5 Fairhaven, 13 Hopedale, 9 

1930, 10 Chelmsford, 43 Fall River, 11 Hopkinton, 68 
Belmont, 27 Chelsea, 17 Falmouth, 8 Hudson, 31 
Berlin, 25 Cheshire, 5 Fitchburg, 8 Huntington, 4 
Bernardston: Chester, 4 Foxborough, 4 Kingston, 8 

1929, 5 Chesterfield, 3 Framingham, 57 Lakeville, 14 

.Beverly, 10 Chicopee, 10 Franklin, 9 Lancaster, 8 

'Billerica, 11 Clinton, 10 Gardner, 5 Lanesborough, 6 

1 To adjust rate on 1929 bill. 
2 Omitted from previous bill. 



Pt. I 

Lawrence, 14 
Leicester, 9 
Leominster, 5 
Lexington, 25 
Leyden: 

1929, 9 
Lincoln, 24 
Lowell, 76 
Lynn: 

1929, 1 2 

1930, 45 
Lynnfield, 6 
Maiden, 48 
Mansfield, 17 
Marion, 5 
Marlborough, 115 
Medford, 59 
Medway, 12 
Melrose, 12 
Mencon, 10 
Merrimac, 6 
Methuen, 13 
Midoleborough, 10 
Middlefield, 2 
Milford, 48 
Millbury, 5 
Millis, 4 
Milton, 8 
Monson, 13 
Montague, 7 
Natick, 21 



29 



Needham, 1 
New Bedford, 14 
New Braintree, 6 
New Marlborough, 1 
New Salem: 
1928, 8 

1929, 10 

1930, 12 
Newton, 29 
North Andover, 3 
North Brookfield, 10 
Northampton, 11 
Northborough, 13 
Northbridge, 1 
Norton, 1 
Norwell, 5 
Norwood, 7 
Orange, IS 
Orleans, 1 
Oxford, 15 
Palmer, 28 
Peabody, 4 
Pelham, 13 
Pembroke, 14 
Peppereli, 7 
Petersham, 9 
Phillipston, 6 
Pittsfield, 7 
Plainfield, 38 
Plymouth, 11 
Provincetown, 2 



Quincy: 

1924, 1 2 

1925, 1 2 

1926, 1 2 

1927, 12 

1928, 1 2 

1929, 3 2 

1930, 43 
Randolph, 51 
Reading, 41 
Rehoboth, 6 
Revere, 17 
Rochester," 5 
Rockland, 22 
Rowe, 5 
Rowley, 2 
Royal ston, 2 
Rutland, 1 
Salem, 9 
Salisbury, 3 
Saugus, 13 
Scituate, 4 
Sharon, 6 
Shelburne, 4 
Sherborn, 2 
Somerville, 68 
Stoughton: 

1929, 46 
South Hadley, 3 
Southborough, 24 
Southbridge, 4 



Southwick, 3 
Spencer, 6 
Springfield, 17 
Stoneham, 31 
Stow, 5 
Sudbury, 1 
Sutton: 

1928, 1 

1929, 4 
Swampscott, 2 
Swansea, 2 
Taunton, 44 
Templeton, 10 
Topsfield, 3 
Uxbridge, 1 
Wakefield, 30 
Wales, 5 
Waltham, 16 
Ware, 25 
Warren, 3 
Washington, 12 
Watertown, 24 
Wellesley, 6 
Wellfieet, 1 

West Brookfield, 10 
West Springfield, 14 
Westborough, 24 
Weymouth, 17 
Whately, 1 
Whitman, 17 



DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING. 

Charles M. Davenport, Director. 

Robert J. Watson, Executive Secretary. 

(41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston.) 

On November 30, 1930, the total number of children who were wards of the 
Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools was 4,446, distributed as follows: 



School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 



In the 


On 




Schools 


Parole 


Total 


488 


1,623 


2,111 


315 


1,052 


1,367 


305 


663 


968 



1,108 



3,338 



4,446 



The total number in the schools on November 30, 1930, is 28 more than on 
November 30, 1929; the two Industrial schools show an increase. 

The Board of Trustees held 12 meetings during the year in addition to 37 meet- 
ings of various committees. A total of 106 separate visits have been made to the 
three schools by members of the Board of Trustees during the year. In addition 
to these visits made by the trustees, the executive secretary of the Board has 
visited the three schools 55 times during the year. 

Boys and girls may be paroled from the training schools at the discretion of the 
trustees. Applications for parole may be made, either in person or by letter, to 
the executive secretary of the trustees, who will see that they are acted upon if the 
boy or girl has been in the training school a reasonable length of time. 

The average length of stay at Lyman School and Industrial School for Girls is 
slightly longer for 1930 than for 1929 but a decrease is shown at the Industrial 
School for Boys. 

Average Length of Stay. 

School 1929 

Lyman School for Boys . . . . . . . . .12.05 mos. 

Industrial School for Boys . . . . . . . . .9.7 mos. 

Industrial School for Girls . . . . . . . . .16.43 mos. 



1930 
12.15 mos. 
8.3 mos. 
16.83 mos. 



Boys' Parole Branch. 

John J. Smith, Superintendent. 
On November 30, 1930, there were 2,675 boys on parole in the care of this depart- 
ment, 1,623 of whom were on parole from the Lyman School for Boys and 1,052 

2 Omitted from previous bill. 



30 P. D. 17 

on parole from the Industrial School for Boys. This represents a net gain of 138 
for the year. Under ordinary conditions this increase would be a problem, but 
with industrial conditions so bad the problem has become acute. With a staff of 
only thirteen visitors supervising nearly 2,700 boys, it may readily be seen that 
any increase in numbers makes it even more difficult to give proper supervision. 

From the Lyman School, there were paroled to their own homes or to relatives, 
436; paroled to foster homes, at wages, 86; paroled to foster homes, at board, 138, 
a total of 660. From the Industrial School for Boys, there were paroled 508 boys, 
437 to their own homes or to relatives and 71 to foster homes. 

We have been particularly fortunate in having a sufficient number of good 
foster homes for boarded boys. The foster parents are, apparently, interested 
more in the welfare of the child than in the small amount of board which they 
receive. 

The supervision of boys on parole in foster homes is most important. It is 
essential that every boy be placed in a foster home where he will do well. In many 
cases this means trying the boy in several foster homes before finding one best 
suited for him. 

Boys paroled to foster homes are those who have no homes, those whose homes 
are too poor to be considered, and those whose homes, even though good, show 
lack of proper supervision. 

The trustees granted honorable discharge to 26 boys on parole from the Lyman 
School for Boys and to 44 on parole from the Industrial School for Boys. Only 
those whose records were exceptional were recommended for honorable discharge. 

Nearly 19,000 visits were made during the year, 6,500 to boys on parole from 
the Industrial School for Boys and the balance to those on parole from the Lyman 
School for Boys. More than 1,500 home investigations were made, as well as 
approximately 150 investigations of foster homes. 

The problem of the boy who is a misfit in a foster home is still serious. It 
frequently happens that a boy has to be tried in several foster homes before he 
does reasonably well. During the year nearly 600 relocations were made, in the 
hope of properly adjusting boys so that they would do their best. 

Visitors in the city districts were called upon to aid boys in their care in pro- 
curing emplojmient, as many seem to have only the slightest idea of how to obtain 
work. A total of more than 1,100 hours was devoted to this seeking of city employ- 
ment. 

On November 30, 1930, this department held 598 separate accounts for boys in 
its care, with total deposits of $29,158.21. 

Under the Acts of 1927, the accounts of boys over age who have not been heard 
from for a period of at least 7 } r ears, are to be turned over to the State Treasurer 
as a trust fund, the income to be expended for special education or assistance of 
the boys in the custody of the Trustees. Two hundred four dollars and six cents 
($204.06) has been expended this year. 

Further details and statistics regarding this work may be found in the report 
of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools which is published separately. 

Girls' Parole Branch. 

Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent. 

Eight hundred twenty-five (825) individual girls and 72 babies were supervised 
by the Girls' Parole Branch during 1930. The weekly per capita cost was $1.37. 
There has been a marked increase in the number of girls on parole in the past ten 
years. In 1920 the Parole Department cared for 506 individual girls. 

The obstacles confronting our parole officers are many. Some of the most 
difficult ones, which are encountered from year to year in the work with girls on 
parole from the Industrial School, are the girls' abnormal mentality, unstable 
emotions, physical disabilities, and bad sex habits. 

The Industrial School girls are not essentially different from other girls, but 
conditions which have surrounded them are vastty different, as the following facts 
will show: Of the 177 girls committed to the school in 1930, only 25 of them had 
fairly good homes, 17 had no homes, 42 had lost either father or mother, 5 had lost 
both parents, the parents of 36 were separated, 19 had either step-father or step- 
mother in the home, 6 were adopted, the mothers of 47 worked outside of the home, 



Pt. I. 31 

123 had immoral or alcoholic relatives living with their families, and 53 had some 
member of their immediate family in penal institutions. 

The delinquencies of these girls which resulted from above conditions were as 
follows: 20 girls were committed to the school in pregnant condition (11 of those 
20 girls were themselves illegitimate), 11 girls had had illegitimate children, 3 girls 
had had abortions, 75 girls had been in other institutions prior to commitment, 
71 girls had previous court record, 150 girls admitted sex experiences, and 44 girls 
were found to have venereal disease. 

When ready for parole the girl leaves the institution where she has been very 
closely supervised and comes again into a world of temptations. She meets many 
discouragements and some failures, but with the kindly interest of a new friend, 
the visitor, there is usually built up in the girl sufficient character to change her 
from being a menace in the community, as she was thought before commitment, 
to becoming a happy, useful woman. 

It is most difficult to find women employers who are willing to take problem 
girls into their homes. A woman must not only be willing, but she must have 
force of character and personality sufficient to control the girl, and wisdom and 
ingenuity to guide and fill her young life with wholesome and absorbing interests. 
We have some wonderful employers, however, with whom girls have lived for a 
long time. We marvel at the employers' patience and kindness. Although the 
women sometimes get discouraged and demand a change of girl, or decide not to 
take another Industrial School girl, the girl has one friend who must help her to 
keep up her courage and who must try to create incentive to fresh endeavor, and 
that friend is the girl's visitor. The visitor safeguards the interest of the girl at 
every point. 

Some girls require many relocations before they adjust themselves to normal 
living. To illustrate : Jennie was committed at the age of ten years to the Indus- 
trial School. She was much handicapped by an uncontrolled temper. She was 
paroled to twenty-seven foster homes in nine years and was visited more than two 
hundred times. She married a good man and has become an unusually fine wife 
and mother. 

There were 2,175 relocations of girls made last year. 

We closed the fiscal year with 603 girls on parole. On November 30, 1925, there 
were only 411 girls on parole. The average age of girls on parole November 30, 
1930, was 18 years; 418 girls were 18 years and over, 202 were between 16 and 18 
years of age, and 43 were under 16 years of age. 

The unemployment of girls this year paroled to their own homes has been dis- 
heartening and upsetting both to the girls themselves and to their relatives. So 
much unhappiness has reigned in their homes as the result of idleness that girls 
have run away who in normal times would not have done so. 

To the school girl group of this year is certainly due much credit for excellent 
spirit and determination. Many of the girls are facing obstacles either within 
themselves, in their own homes or in foster homes, or in the community, which 
girls far better equipped mentally and emotionally would have difficulty in over- 
coming. 

Eighty-three (83) girls in the care of the Parole Department attended school 
during the year; 45 of these girls were enrolled in grammar school, 27 in high school, 
4 in trade school, 6 in business college, and 1 in a seminary, and 8 girls attended 
continuation schools. These eight girls are not included in the school group. 
The state paid board for only five of the eighty-three school girls. 

The health of the girls is very important and is carefully watched by the visitors 
and the hospital worker. In 1930, 355 girls were taken 1,938 times to hospitals, 
private doctors, and dentists for treatment and diagnosis. There were 165 ward 
patients. This is an enormous increase over the hospital work of previous years. 
Many of these hospital cases were for treatment of venereal disease. The girls 
were not, in most cases, in infectious condition but needed continued medical care. 

It is very upsetting to our girls to go to the hospital, week after week, for medical 
attention. In meeting one another they exchange addresses and compare wages 
and privileges, which has bad results many times. If the girl who has venereal 
disease could remain longer in the School lor her treatments, she would begin her 
parole under more favorable conditions. 



32 P. D. 17 

On November 30, 1930, there were 488 active bank accounts, amounting to 
$22,412.48. Forty-seven girls had between $100 and $200, 17 girls had between 
$200 and $300, and 3 girls had $300 or over. The two largest amounts at the end 
of the year were $531.77 and $699.20. This year many girls contributed gener- 
ously and regularly to their families. 

Further details and statistics regarding this work may be found in the annual 
report of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools, which is published 
separately. 

HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING. 

Edward T. Hart man, Consultant on Planning. 

There are boards in four places of over 10,000 that were without them a year 
ago. Beverly, Cambridge, and Greenfield have filled vacancies due to resignations 
en masse. Danvers has established her first board. New boards have been estab- 
lished in Concord, Manchester, Randolph, Sharon, Wenham, and Wilbraham. 
This makes seven entirely new boards. 

The total is 115 boards established and appointed or elected and three places, 
Andover, Great Barrington, and Nantucket, which have established boards but 
failed to elect them. Two new towns only have come into the required list under 
the new census, Athol and Swampscott. Swampscott has a by-law committee 
which is considering the matter. 

The extension of zoning work has been very small, an elementary law having 
been adopted in Franklin, and interim laws in Attleboro and Peabody. This 
makes 70 places with some kind of zoning, covering 3,038,104 of the population of 
the state. There are 32 places that have prepared zoning schemes which have 
failed of adoption. 

Enabling Laws. 

Experience shows that Massachusetts needs modern, comprehensive planning 
and zoning enabling laws. Our planning law is elementary and not abreast of the 
times. Our planning and board of survey laws should be consolidated and the 
planning work placed in the hands of planning boards. The powers now covered 
should be extended to cover all questions of street lay-out, subdivision and zoning. 

An important feature of a proper enabling law is subdivision control. Sub- 
division control is a crying need. Developers who are mere land butchers fre- 
quently promise streets and all utilities. They charge lot buyers for these things, 
but do not provide them. Later the town has to provide them and assess them 
upon the buyers or pay the bill itself. Thus they are paid for twice. Since it is 
right that the area should carry its own development charges, the only just way 
is to require the developer, under bond, to provide the utilities decided upon as 
proper. The argument that this makes lots too expensive is wrong. The pur- 
chaser pays. To require development under bond provides that the purchaser 
gets what he buys, and does not have to pay for it a second time under betterments . 

The Work of Planning Boards. 

This question was covered in Bulletin 1 of the Division, and it has been covered 
in various reports. The subject is not out of place, however, as long as a chairman 
can say, as one has said during the year, "Why meet when there is nothing to do?" 
There is no place, whether or not it has a board, which has nothing to do. Only 
Utopia has no planning, or traffic, or zoning, or housing, or park, or playground, 
or other problems affecting its physical growth. If planning board members can't 
see the problems, let the people elect other members. Why elect a man who is so 
indifferent, so lacking in imagination, energy and efficiency, that he remains totally 
dead so far as the work of the board is concerned? 

To get results a planning board must 

1. Have ideas. It must conceive things that need to be done. They must 
be things that will permanantly help the town. 

2. Work out the details, the how and the cost of doing the things needed. 

3. Do things. To think of things as needed is not all. To work out all 
details is but one step. To get the things done is the thing. How to get 
things done in a democracy is not simple. But until a thing is done there 
is no accomplishment. Results count. 



Pt. I. 33 

Arguments for Zoning. 
The division was asked to supply arguments against zoning for a high school 
debate. An earnest effort was made, with complete failure. The early arguments: 
— unconstitutional, unreasonable, against private rights, etc., — were found to 
be specious. The courts have disposed of all these arguments. They could not 
do otherwise. Zoning is a form of insurance. Its economic, health, and social 
values are doubtless for all time more worthwhile, from year to year, than all the 
fire insurance carried by any place. 

Zoning Administration. 
We are almost "eveready" when it comes to making complaints about which 
we do not intend to do anything. When an honest official is attacked, as he always 
will be by certain people when he enforces any law, citizens perform the vanishing 
act and even turn against the capable officer at the next election. It is yet an open 
question as to whether we retire more officers for inefficiency than for efficiency. 
It is always open season against efficient officers. The open season against those 
who are incapable or crooked is intermittent. 

Some Problems. 

A Miniature Golf Course is a use of premises and may be regulated. It generally 
requires a building or structure and these may be regulated. It is a business, not 
a club, and should not be allowed in a residence district. Golf courses are per- 
mitted in residential areas. The Supreme Court of New York says a miniature 
golf course is not a golf course and the game played thereon is not golf. 

Airports are a sign of modern progress, but at the same time one of the greatest 
nuisances that can be admitted into a residence district. Any residential town 
that is considering an airport should weigh carefully all aspects of the matter, or 
it is liable, practically sure, to find itself with a white elephant on its hands. 

As affecting the interests and development of every place the noise nuisance is of 
ever-increasing importance. We have laws on noises by automobiles, hawkers, 
dogs. They are ignored by the people and entirely unenforced by the police. 
There is need for loud-speaker regulation. There is need for more effective enforce- 
ment of the noise laws. 

The fight between beauty and ugliness is not ended. Sidewalk Advertising is a 
recent menace. The movement spreads, although it is against sound public 
policy, is an offense against the public, and is illegal. 

The growing desire of people for a chance to walk, and the deadliness of our 
highways for this purpose, lend significance to the proposals for highway sidewalks 
and trails. The two can be effectively combined. 

Under a new law, Connecticut has handled her automobile graveyard problem. 
Some 250 locations have been covered, over 180 cleaned up and but about 61 
licensed to operate under regulation. 

A problem facing every place is to have a good zoning law. All zoning ordi- 
nances and by-laws need careful watching to see that they are not weak in important 
directions. Some of these weaknesses may be crude use zoning, no regulation of 
the use of premises, no minimum lot sizes, or maximum coverage, or height limits, 
or front, rear and side yard provisions, or court provisions for tenements, or reason- 
able regulation of accessory and non-conforming uses, or yard provisions for non- 
residential uses permitted in residential districts. 

The growth mania continues to be one of the most serious problems. If growth 
cannot be both socially and economically sound there should be no growth. "But 
growth increases land values." Yes, and loads upon the people a constantly 
increasing overhead charge to increase the cost of living and decrease the needed 
things that can be bought. It is as sensible to boast that bread costs more in your 
town as to boast of high land values. 

A common mistake is to welcome any and all items of growth, "because they 
increase the amount of taxable property." Zoning is frequently frowned upon 
because "it prevents growth." To permit a filling station in the midst of what 
should become a protected residential area is growth — like a goitre, which is 
growth we can better get along without. 



34 



P. D. 17, 



Planning Board Activities. 





Boards 


Established 




No Board 


Amesbury 


Fall River 


Milton 


Southbridge 


Adams 


Amherst* 


Falmouth* 


Nahant* 


Springfield 


Chelsea 


Arlington 


Fitchburg 


Natick 


Stoneham 


Marlborough 


Ashland* 


Framingham 


Needham 


Stoughton* 




Attleboro 


Franklin* 


New Bedford 


Sudbury* 




Auburn* 


Gardner 


Newbury port 


Taunton 




Barnstable* 


Gloucester 


Newton 


Tisbury* 




Bedford* 


Greenfield 


North Adams 


Wakefield 




Belmont 


Haverhill 


Northampton 


Walpole* 




Beverly 


Hingham* 


North Attleborough 


Waltham 




Boston 


Holyoke 


Northbridge* 


Watertown 




Bourne* 


Hudson* 


Norwood 


Wayland* 




Braintree 


Lawrence 


Oak Bluffs* 


Webster 




Bridgewater* 


Leominster 


Orange* 


Wellesley 




Brockton 


Lexington* 


Palmer* 


Wenharn* 




Brookline 


Longmeadow* 


Faxton 


Westborough* 




Cambridge 


Lowell 


Peabody 


West field 




Canton* 


Lynn 


Pittsfield 


Weston* 




Chicopee 


Lynnfield* 


Plymouth 


West Springfield 




Clinton 


Maiden 


Quincy 


Westwood* 




Concord* 


Manchester* 


Randolph* 


Weymouth 




Danvers 


Mansfield* 


Reading* 


Wilbraham* 




Dartmouth* 


Marblehead* 


Revere 


Wilmington* 




Dedham 


Medfield* 


Salem 


Winchester 




Duxbury* 


Medford 


Saugus 


Winthrop 




Easthampton 


Melrose 


Scituate* 


Woburn 




East Longmeadow* 


Methuen 


Sharon* 


Worcester 




Everett 


Middleborough* 


Shrewsbury* 


Yarmouth* 




Fairhaven 


Milford 


Somerville 







Under 10,000 population. 

Cities and Towns which have been Zoned. 



Comprehensive 


Use 


Prepared but Not 


Adopted 


Brockton 


Nov. 


, 1920 


Milton 


July, 


1922 


Amesbury 




Brookline 


May 


1922 


Holyoke 


Sept. 


, 1923 


Amherst 




Longmeadow 


July. 


1922 


Swampscott 


Apr., 


1924 


Andover 




Springfield 


Dec. 


1922 


Dedham 


May 


1924 


Attleboro 




Newton 


Dec. 


1922 


Chelsea 


June 


1924 


Beverly 




West Springfield 


May 


1923 


Paxton 


Dec, 


1924 


Bourne 




Cambridge 


Jan., 


1924 


Worcester 


Dec, 


1924 


Biaintree 




-Lexington 


Mai. 


1924 


Wellesley 


Mar. 


1925 


Chatham 




Melrose 


Mar. 


1924 


Salem 


Nov. 


1925 


Chelsea 




Winchester 


Mar. 


1924 


Hudson 


Mar. 


1927 


Chicopee 




Arlington 


May 


1924 


Bedford 




1928 


Clinton 




Boston 


June, 


1924 








Duxbury 




Woburn 


Jan., 


1925 








Easthampton 




Belmont 


Jan., 


1925 








Fitchburg 




Needham 


Mar. 


1925 








Framingham 




Walpole 


Mar. 


1925 








Gardner 












Stoneham 


Mar. 


1925 








Hingham 




Waltham 


July. 


1925 


Interim 






Leominster 




Haverhill 


Oct., 


1925 








Littleton 




Medford 


Oct., 


1925 








Marion 












Wakefield 


Nov, 


1925 








Medfield 




North Adams 


Dec, 


1925 


Westfield 


July, 


1922 


Nahant 




Somen ille 


Dec, 


1925 


Taunton 


Sept. 


1925 


Northampton 




New Beaford 


Dec, 


1925 


Marlborough 


Jan., 


1927 


North Attleborough 




Watertown 


Jan., 


1926 


Anaover 


Mar., 


1927 


Plymouth 




Fairhaven 


Feb., 


1926 


Petersham 


Mar., 


1927 


Quincy 




Falmouth 


Apr., 


1926 


Oak Bluffs 


Apr., 


1927 


Scituate 




Reading 


May, 


J928 


Northampton 


Sept., 


1927 


Shrewsbury 




Lynn 


June, 


1926 


Barnstable 


June. 


1929 


Southbriage 




Lowed 


Juiy, 


1926 


Attleboro 


May, 


1930 


Sudbury 




Maiden 


july, 


1926 


Peabody 


June, 


1930 


Wilmington 




Everett 


July, 


1926 








Yarmouth 




Norwood 


May, 


1927 












Gloucester 


Nov., 


1927 












Pittsfield 


Dec, 


1927 












Marbleheaa 


Apr., 


1928 




















Weston 


Apr., 


1928 












Concord 


Apr., 


1928 


Partial 










Agawam 


Apr., 


1928 












East Longmeadow 


Apr., 


1928 




















Saugus 


June, 


1928 












Lincoln 


Mar., 


1929 


Marshfield 


June, 


1926 






West wood 


Mar., 


1929 


Fall River 


Sept., 


1927 






Revere 


July, 


1929 












Winthrop 


Oct., 


1929 












Lynnfield 


Nov., 


1929 












Franklin 


Mar., 


1930 













Pt. I. 35 

Housing Experiment at Lowell. 

The condition of the housing experiment at Lowell remains unchanged with 
payments on the houses erected going on regularly. 

A statement of the money spent and the money paid back into the State Treasury 
is as follows : 

Appropriation (made in 1917) $50,000 00 

Expenses : 

Land purchased, 7 acres with room for 40 houses, including also one house 

standing on lot $12,500 00 

Cost of 12 houses 28,128 77 

Improvements .......... 2,626 77 

43,255 54 

Balance returned to State treasury ......... $6,744 46 

Sale price of houses and lots ........... $36,862 30 

Amount paid on principal ............. 26,988 27 

Principal remaining unpaid Dec. 1, 1930 $9,874 03 

Paid back to State treasury in monthly installments: 

Interest $13,391 97 

Principal 26,988 27 

Rent 3 26 

$40,383 50 

THE FIVE INSTITUTIONS. 

A brief statement relating to the general supervision of each institution will be 
followed by comparative and more detailed consideration of financial adminis- 
tration. Further details about the work of the various institutions may be found 
in the institution reports which are published separately. 

THE STATE INFIRMARY, TEWKSBURY. 

John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent. 
Trustees. 
G. Forrest Martin, M.D., Lowell, Chairman. 
Mrs. Nellie E. Talbot, Brookline, Secretary. 
Francis W. Anthony, M.D., Haverhill. 
Mrs. Mary E. Cogan, Stoneham. 
Walter F. Dearborn, M.D., Cambridge. 
Mr. Robert G. Stone, Brookline. 
Mr. Dennis D. Sullivan, Middleborough. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $2,654,487.14. 
Normal capacity of plant, 2,800. Value per unit of capacity, $948.03. 
Provides infirmary care for indigent persons not chargeable for support to any 
city or town. 

Numbers. 

Males Females Total 

Number Dec. 1, 1929 1,638 1,058 2,696 

Admitted during year .2,716 826 3,542 

Discharged during year 2,395 812 3,207 

Remaining Nov. 30, 1930 1,959 1,072 3,031 

Individuals under care during year ....... 5,785 

Daily average inmates during year 1,730 1,096 2,826 

Daily average employes during year ...... 218.11 279.03 497.14 

Largest census during year ........ - 3,058 

Smallest census during year ........ - 2,633 

Of the 6,238 cases cared for during the year, 5,775 were in the general hospital 
wards; of which 4,390 were males and 1,385 were females. Of this number, 1,228 
were discharged well, 482 were improved, 1,303 not improved, 532 died, and 2,230 
remained in the hospital at the end of the year. Of the number cared for in the 
hospital, there were 548 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, 4 of influenza, 3 of erysip- 
elas, 18 of measles, 1 of malaria, 1 of diphtheria, and 4 of scarlet fever. There 
were also 140 cases of alcoholism, an increase of 15. Of the number of deaths, 120 
were due to tuberculosis of the lungs. 

An increase of 16 this year, gives a total of 95 cases of cancer treated. 

There is an increase of 259 in the daily average number of patients in the insti- 
tution as compared with the preceding year. 



36 P. D. 17. 

In the department for tuberculosis, the number of patients treated shows an 
increase over last year, particularly in the women's department. The total 
number treated was 577, classified as minimal, 35; moderately advanced, 180; 
far advanced, 362. A majority of the pulmonary group, on admission, has shown 
moderately advanced or far advanced lesions. Of the number treated, 412 were 
in the men's department, and 165 in the women's department. Five (5) were 
discharged as arrested; 17 relieved; 148 not relieved. One hundred twenty-six 
(126), 86 males and 40 females, died — leaving 221 in this department at the end 
of the year. In the non-pulmonary group there were 29; 19 males and ten females. 

During the year the children in the women's department for tuberculosis were 
transferred to other institutions, or in some cases to their own homes. All of these 
children were improved on discharge, many of them being classified as arrested. 
In non-pulmonary cases, heliotherapy had been used throughout the year with 
good results. 

In the men's hospital there is an increase in the number of the very aged and 
those requiring a longer duration of care or treatment. It is becoming more 
difficult to meet the requirements. With a capacity of 449 beds, 2,716 cases were 
received during the year for classification and treatment. Eighty-seven (87) major 
operations have been performed in this department and 281 male patients have 
received minor surgical treatment. 

A clinic for the injection treatment of varicose veins has been established, which 
has proved satisfactory and popular with the patients, as many cases formerly 
requiring operation are now adequately relieved by this method, in which hospital- 
ization of the patient is not necessary. 

In the women's department there has been much overcrowding especially as 
the prenatal cases have been transferred to this department temporarily during 
the construction of the new maternity building. There has been an increase in the 
number of aged women with chronic illnesses requiring prolonged hospital residence. 
Forty-eight (48) major surgical operations have been performed in this department. 
In the women's venereal clinic were treated 144 cases of gonorrhea and 71 cases of 
syphilis. In the obstetrical clinic there were 147 births, 80 males and 67 females; 
5 were still-born. 

An eye clinic is held once a week for the examination and treatment of diseases 
of the eye and for prescribing and supplying glasses to patients in need of them. 
As many as forty patients attend this clinic in one day. The X-ray department is 
under the direction of a physician who devotes two afternoons each week for cases 
requiring consultation, advice, and treatment. 

In the department for the insane there were 74 admissions, with a daily average 
of 802; 246 males and 556 females. Of the 74 admissions, 48 were first admissions; 
2 readmissions; and 24 transferred from other hospitals for the insane. Nineteen 
were discharged from the books; 11 as improved; 8 as unimproved. There were 
49 deaths; 21 males and 28 females. An average of 145 men and 261 women were 
productively employed during the year. 

The dental department has been busy attending to the wants of the inmates, 
there being 1,516 chair patients in addition to the plates and bridge work needed. 

Occupational therapy as an adjunct to other methods in use at the State Infirmary 
has made substantial progress during the last year. With an occupational therapist 
and three assistants, the work has been gradually extended to cover the greater 
part of the hospital and has proved to be of special therapeutic value in many indi- 
vidual cases, with marked importance throughout the wards. An average of 143 
patients monthly have been treated. 

The farm has been very productive this year. The dairy herd is accredited free 
from tuberculosis since 1924 and comprises 181 head of stock of which 130 are 
pure bred. An honor roll certificate from the National Dairy Association was 
awarded for butter fat production. 

During the past year, an average of 145 men and 261 women were kept employed 
at some kind of productive work. 

The water tower, erected during the previous year, has been connected with the 
water mains and put into commission, providing an increased pressure from 50 to 
80 pounds with a storage capacity of one million gallons. Two electric pumps 
were installed at the pumping station, thereby increasing the pumping capacity 



Pt. I. 



37 



from 354,000 to 497,000 gallons per day. The combined storage capacity, including 
the old water tower, is now one and one-half million gallons and greatly improves 
the fire protection. 

A dining room and kitchen on the first floor of the old East Ward has been estab- 
lished ; an overhead passage way from the men's hospital to the isolation ward #1 
was built, and numerous other improvements have been made. 

The old maternity hospital was torn down and a new building erected, which is 
now nearing completion. 

Contracts were let for the extension to the men's hospital, and for the industrial 
building. 

Work has also been started on two fireproof stairways and elevators in the 
Women's Hospital and on the extension for 24 tie-ups at the dairy barn. 

With an appropriation of $1,052,900 plus $21,747.78 brought forward from the 
balance of 1929, the total amount available for maintenance was $1,074,647.78. 
Of this amount $1,045,552.05 was expended. Of the amount expended $461,925.81 
was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $583,626.24. Net weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $7,071. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$126,689. 51. _ Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $918,862.54. 
Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily average number of 
inmates, 5.6. The trustees estimate that $1,160,034 will be necessary for main- 
tenance in 1931. 

In compliance with section 4, chapter 29, of the General Laws, the following 
estimates for special objects and items are submitted: 



Employees' Quarters (24 double rooms) .... 

Assistant Physician's House ...... 

Men's Dormitory (196 beds) ...... 

New Domestic Centre to Men's T. B. Hospital (200 patients) 
Land . . . . . . . . 

WalKS and driveways ....... 



$74,000 00 

12,000 00 

70,000 00 

31,800 00 

2,000 00 

4,000 00 

$188,470 00 



Numbers. 














133 














44 














42 














135 














177 














137 














143 


ged ). 












22 



INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT AT THE STATE FARM, BRIDGEWATER. 

(Under the 'Department of Correction.) 
Henry J. Strann, Superintendent. 
Provides infirmary care for indigent persons (male) not chargeable to any city 
or town. The data following are for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1930. 

Number Oct. 1, 1929 . . . 

Admitted during year . 

Discharged during year 

Remaining Sept. 30, 1930 . 

Individuals under c^re during year 

Daily average inmates during year 

Largest census during year . 

Deaths during year (included in discharged ) 

MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON. 

John E. Fish, M. D., Superintendent. 
Trustees. 
Mr. Walter C. Baylies, Taunton, Chairman. 
Mr. George H. Ellis, Newton. 
Mr. William :F. Fitzgerald, Brookline. 
Mr. Andrew Marshall, Boston. 
Robert Soutter, M.D., Boston. 

Opened December 1, 1907. Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $758,- 
277.40. Normal capacity of plant, 316. Value per unit of capacity, $2,399.61. 

Provides cares and schooling for crippled and deformed children of the Common- 
wealth; those between the ages of five and fifteen and mentally competent to 
attend public schools are eligible for admission. Medical and surgical treatment 
lor minor wards under the care of the Division of Child Guardianship is also 
provided. 



38 . P. D. 17. 

Numbers. 

Males Females Total 

Number Dec. 1, 1929 120 152 272 

Admitted during year 299 234 533 

Discharged during year . 268 223 491 

Remaining Nov. 30, 1930 151 163 314 

Individuals under care during year ....... 805 

Laily average inmates during v ear ....... 148.2 158 306.2 

Daily average employees during year ...... 36.44 75.9 112.34 

Largest census during year ........ - - 336 

Smallest census during year ........ - - 184 

Every effort is made to put the child in the proper attitude toward life, to elim- 
inate self pity, to develop character, and to teach him that physical disability is 
not the handicap he has been led to believe, but rather an inconvenience to be 
overcome. 

Of the 805 cases cared for during the year, 491 were discharged, — 376 from 
hospital care and 115 from the school. There have been admitted 533 children, — 
408 to the hospital and 125 to the school. There remained at the close of the 3 r ear, 
282 crippled and deformed children in the school and 32 sick minor wards in the ■ 
hospital. The average age of the 147 children admitted to the School Depart- 
ment during the year was 6 years, 2 months and 21 days; the youngest being 1 year, 
2 months and 7 days; and the oldest, 20 years, 11 months and 25 days. Of the 
385 state minor wards admitted for hospital care, the youngest was 2 months and 
6 days; the oldest, 20 years, 11 months and 27 days; and the average, 10 years, 
1 month and 15 days. 

Exclusive of 13 whose birthplaces are unknown, 430, or 86 per cent, of the 500 
children actually admitted were born in Massachusetts; 46, or 9.2 per cent, were 
born in other parts of the United States; and 11, or 2.2 per cent, came from foreign 
countries. The nativity of 121 fathers and 63 mothers was unknown. Out of 
the remainder, 110, or 22 per cent, of the fathers, and 183, or 36.6 per cent, of the 
mothers, were born in Massachusetts; 84 fathers and 64 mothers were born in 
other parts of the United States; while 185, or 37 per cent, of the fathers, and 190, 
or 38 per cent, of the mothers were foreign born. 

Every child received at the institution, whether an orthopedic case for the 
school department or a minor ward for hospital care only, is entered through the 
Bradford Infirmary. On first admission a complete physical examination is made 
as a routine procedure including X-ray, laboratory analyses, dental examination, 
and other diagnostic measures. School cases usually are held at the infirmary 
until they have passed the incubation period of the common contagious diseases. 
During this period following the initial examination, the social worker, having 
previously seen the child at home, is helpful in making new adjustments pleasant; 
the dental hygienist takes up her duties with the child and the necessary braces, 
splints, and orthopedic appliances are prescribed by the physicians for the work of 
the apparatus shop. Any surgical procedure for the correction of deformities 
usually is not begun until a child has become well established in school. When 
a surgical operation has been decided upon, or a child's illness demands special 
medical and nursing care, he may be and frequently is readmitted to the infirmary 
by transfer from the school department. 

The time since the establishment of the school is now sufficiently long so that 
some of the graduates are successful members of the business world. Many of 
the young men and women have won for themselves positions of trust and respon- 
sibility. Several, after commercial training and successful experience in business, 
have entered the employ of the institution itself and have proved to be exceptionally 
well fitted. The ungraded class of last year, in its adjustment of special cases, was 
so successful that another class has been added. The class recently formed for 
commercial training has passed the stage of trial and is an established success. 
Six new typewriters have been added and already several of the last year's pupils 
can take a business letter in shorthand and produce it exceptionally well typed 
and ready for the mail. 

There has been a larger enrollment of children than ever before. This may be 
explained by a greater public confidence or a clearer understanding of the purposes 
of the school, for there is no evidence to justify the assumption that there are 
proportionately any more crippled children than heretofore. 



Pt. I. 39 

The growth and development of the institution emphasizes the need for better 
accommodations for officials and employees, while cottages, hospital and school 
facilities for patients have been of paramount necessity. 

A valued addition to the plant this year was the construction of a thirty-bed 
cottage for the accommodation of boys who should be removed from the hospital 
wards during their period of convalescence. Contract for the work was signed 
July 31, 1930, and construction has proceeded rapidly in the anticipation that it 
will be completed early in January, 1931. The building is directly south of the 
west wing of the West Dormitory in L form, placed on a side hill of the right 
exposure, the advantage of the side hill being that the housing can be accomplished 
with minimum foundation and roofing, therefore making the smallest cubage for 
the required accommodation. The bedrooms and sitting room are planned like 
a bungalow with low roof, and the kitchen and dining room are on a floor below in 
one arm of the L on the side hill. The building covers approximately 5,000 square 
feet. It is a fireproof building of masonry construction with frame roof covered 
with asbestos slate and ceiled with wire lath and plaster. The interior walls and 
partitions are of light cream-colored glazed fire brick tile. In choosing this durable 
material, which is suitable for public buildings, care has been given to plan it to 
harmonize with the conditions of domestic architecture. The exterior design is 
carried out with common brick to correspond with the other new buildings of the 
school. 

The trustees recommend an appropraition for the erection, in 1931, of a similar 
cottage for girls, also a house for the superintendent. 

From the income of a special fund, talking motion pictures were made possible 
for the children, thus delighting their hearts with wonderful and fascinating stories 
thrown upon the screen. These pictures have become an accepted part of the 
program for entertainment and education. 

It seems probable that demands upon the institution will continue to increase. 
The extension of hospital social service, and community, public health and school 
nurses may be expected to bring forth cases which heretofore have gone unrecog- 
nized or at least untreated or uneducated. 

The state-wide survey now being conducted by the Department doubtless will 
reveal other children whose needs have not been appreciated. The seasonal 
incidence of infantile paralysis, one of the chief causes of cripples, still must be 
counted upon annually to contribute victims of a disease which has not yet been 
brought under control. The compulsory annual school census and authority for 
towns and cities to provide instruction under the law passed at the last session of 
the legislature (Section 46 A of Chapter 368 of the Acts of 1930) will do much to 
alleviate suffering and prevent neglect of certain cases. 

The physiotherapist has treated daily 24 cases of infantile paralysis of long 
standing, some of whom have been taught to walk without the aid of crutches. 
Several cases of chronic arthritis have been relieved by baking treatment and 
massage. During the summer months, the physiotherapist supervised games and 
sports out of doors. Baseball and swimming groups were organized and given 
instruction. 

With an appropriation of $202,910, plus $4,878.48 brought forward from balance 
of 1929, the total amount available for maintenance was $207,788.48. Of this 
amount $199,454.45 was expended. Of the amount expended $111,958.06 was for 
salaries, wages and labor; $87,496.39 for all other expenses. Net weekly per 
capita cost of maintenance, $12.46. Total receipts from all sources other than the 
State treasury, $81,395.55. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$118,058.90. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily average 
number of inmates, 2.7. The trustees estimated the sum of $210,875 for main- 
tenance in 1931. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following estimate, with a request 
for special appropriation covering the same : 

1. 30 bed cottage for children ....... $50 000 

2. House for Superintendent ' ] 22*000* 



40 P. D. 17. 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, WESTBOROUGH. 

Charles A. Keeler, Superintendent. 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 
Mr. James W. McDonald, Marlborough, Chairman. 
Mr. Clarence J. McKenzie, Winthrop, V ice-Chairman. 
Mrs. Josephine Bleakie Colburn, Wellesley Hills. 
Mr. Eugene T. Connolly, Beverly. 
Mr. Charles M. Davenport, Boston. 
Mr. Benjamin F. Felt, Melrose. 
Mr. Ransom C. Pingree, Boston. 
Miss Amy Ethel Taylor, Lexington. 
Mr. William B. Thurber, Milton. 
Mr. Robert J. Watson, 41 Mt. Vernon Street, Executive Secretary. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $852,562.77. Normal capacity of 
plant, 480. Value per unit of capacity, $1,776.17. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent boys under fifteen 
years of age. Cottage plan. 

Numbers. 

T\ umber Dec. 1, 1929 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year 
Remaining Nov. 30, 1930 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year 



vlales 


Females 


Total 


506 


_ 


506 


825 


- 


825 


843 


- 


843 


488 


- 


488 


819 


— 


819 


484 


- 


484 


67 


43 


110 


541 


— 


541 


435 


- 


435 



Of the 825 cases received during the year, 306 were committed by courts, listed 
as follows: assault and battery, 5; assault with dangerous weapon, 1; breaking 
and entering, 111; delinquent child, 3; habitual school offender, 1; indecent 
assault, 3; larceny, 112; lewdness, 3; malicious injury to property, 1; ringing 
false alarm of fire, 3 ; running away, 1 1 ; setting fires, 2; stubbornness, 33 ; trespass, 
2; unlawful appropriation of autos, 15. 

Of the above, 273 had been arrested before and 30 had been inmates of other 
institutions. Seventy-five (75), or 21 per cent, were of American parentage; 183, 
or 60 per cent, were foreign born ; and the parentage of 10 was unknown. Eighteen 
(18) of the boys were foreign born, and 288 were born in the United States. In 
addition to the court commitments, 382 were returned from places, 78 runaways 
captured, 51 returned from hospitals, 2 returned from leave of absence and 6 
returned from funerals. 

Of the new commitments this year, 56 boys were eleven years of age or under. 
These young boys are taken care of in two cottages, one seven miles and the other 
three miles from the main school. They do not mingle with the older boys. 

The average length of stay in the Lyman School of boys paroled for the first time 
during the year ending November 30, 1930, was 12.15 months. 

Of the 843 cases discharged or released during the year, 436 were released on 
parole to parents and relatives; released on parole to others than relatives, 86; 
boarded out, 138; runaways, 88; released to hospitals, 59; transferred to other 
institutions, 22; released to funerals, 7; granted leave of absence, 4; released to 
court on habeas, 2; discharged, 1. 

This year has been one of encouragement in many respects. The health of the 
boys has been exceptionally good. No serious illnesses have occurred and the 
daily average enrollment was 484, 39 less than 1929. The number of new commit- 
ments dropped from 326 to 306. A number of the older boys were returned to 
the school, due to the serious unemployment conditions. 

The average age of the boys committed to this School is approximately 12 years. 
At least 65 per cent of all boys receive 25 hours of school training each week. The 
average attendance for the year ending November 30, 1930, was 309. Four 
hundred twelve (412) boys were admitted to the school during the year and 414 
boys were discharged. 



Pt. I. 41 

Our general aim in the school is to give the boys, as nearly as possible, the equiv- 
alent of the work of public schools; to vary the routine of our work so they may 
be free from monotony of institution life; and lastly to endeavor to build a new 
code of morals and ethics which will shape their minds for a more wholesome 
appreciation of life. 

The system of studies is similar to that in the public schools, though, owing to 
the slightly lower mentality of the average institution boy and the variations of 
the classes due to new arrivals and discharges, progress must necessarily be slower. 
It is expedient to give a boy a Binet test before placing him in school. Often a 
boy who has fallen into delinquency is no longer interested in his school work. 
A fairly accurate indication of his mental worth is given by the test. By com- 
parison of the test with the report of the teacher, the boy is finally placed in the 
grade where he will make the most progress. 

In conjunction with the academic department, morning sessions in sloyd and 
band work are given to 90 boys. Our band is always an outstanding organization 
of which any school might feel proud, and consists of 35 boys. 

These boys are at an age to receive much benefit from physical exercise. Gym- 
nasium work consists of the standard drills and setting-up exercises, together with 
instruction in outdoor sports in season. 

The psychiatric clinic deals with many boy problems and school and work' 
placements are being made with less trial and error and more certainty. 

The results from the Print Shop during the year have been very satisfactory. 
There has been an increase in the volume of work over any former period as the 
greater part of the printing of the Department of Public Welfare is done here. 
The apprentice is taught the complete work from case to customer, regardless of 
the number of operations it must pass through. 

The outstanding improvement of the year is the completion of a new brick 
cottage for boys. A similar one and a new assembly building are in process of 
construction and should be ready for occupancy in the early summer. 

Two new silos were built and 344 tons of silage corn were harvested. The dairy 
produced 223,725 quarts of milk, 6,193 pounds of butter, 581 pounds of veal and 
4,444 pounds of beef; also there was produced 20,076 pounds of pork, 2,460 bushels 
of potatoes, an abundant supply of all kinds of vegetables and fruit, and an unusually 
large crop of hay. 

From an appropriation of $251,900, $239,455.99 was expended. Of the amount 
expended $117,281.46 was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $122,- 
174.53. Net weekly per capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less 
sales and refunds from maintenance, $9,436. Total receipts from all sources 
other than the State treasury, $1,515.27. Net cost of maintenance to the Com- 
monwealth, $237,940.72. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to 
daily average number of inmates, 1 to 4.3. The trustees estimate that $259,623 
will be necessary for maintenance in 1931. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following estimate, with request 
for a special appropriation covering the same : 

1. For completion, furnishings and equipment of assembly building ..... $10,000 00 

2. Construction, equipment and furnishings of a brick cottage for boys .... 62,500 00 

3. Materials for three cottages for employees ........ 4,500 00 

4. Completion, equipment ana furnishings of 1930 cottage for boys 7,500 00 



$84,500 00 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY. 

George P. Campbell, Superintendent. 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $699,760.16. Normal capacity of 
plant, 290. Value per unit of capacity, $2,412.96. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over fifteen and under 
twenty-one years of age. Only boys under eighteen may be admitted. 



42 



Number Dec. 1, 1929 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year 
Remaining Nov. 30, 1930 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Laigest census during year 
Smallest census during year 



P. D. 17. 



Numbers. 



Males 


Females 


Total 


295 


- 


295 


628 


— 


628 


608 


- 


608 


315 


— 


315 


732 


- 


732 


319 


- 


319 


55 


20 


75 


345 


- 


345 


274 


- 


274 



The list of causes of admission in the 436 cases committed during the year was 
as follows: assault, 3; assault and battery, 2; attempt to break and enter, 4; 
attempted larceny, 1; being a runaway, 12; breaking and entering, 58; breaking 
and entering and larceny, 67; carrying a dangerous weapon, 6; destroying property, 
4; failure on parole, 15; forgery, 1; gaming, 1; indecent assault, 3; indecent 
exposure, 2; larceny, 107; lewdness, 3; malicious mischief, 4; receiving stolen 
goods, 3; robbery, 1; setting fires, 2; stubborn, disobedient and delinquent, 32; 
taking horse, 1; unlawful appropriation of auto, 80; unnatural act, 2; vagrancy, 3; 
violating auto laws, 19. 

In addition to the above, 146 boys were returned from parole, 8 returned from 
leave of absence, 36 returned from hospitals, and 2 from court. Four hundred 
twenty-one (421) of those received during the year were committed by the courts. 
Of the boys thus committed, 348 had been in court before, and 91 had been inmates 
of other institutions. Twenty-nine (29), or 7 per cent, of the 436 boys received 
were foreign born, and 402, or 94 per cent, were born in the United States. Eighty- 
two (82), or 19 per cent, were of American parentage; 218, or 50 per cent, were of 
foreign born parents; while the parentage of 28 was unknown. The average length 
of stay of boys in the school was 8.3 months. 

Of the 608 boys discharged or released during the year, 396 were paroled; returned 
cases re-paroled, 112; granted leave of absence, 8; transferred to Massachusetts 
Reformatory, 12; committed to Department for Defective Delinquents at Bridge- 
water, 1 ; transferred to other institutions, not penal, 43 ; taken to court on habeas 
and returned later, 2; taken to court on habeas and not returned, 1 ; absent without 
leave, 30; transferred to Lyman School for Boys, 2; discharged as unfit subject, 1. 

With a normal capacity of 290 the school carried an average of 319 during the 
year. The overcrowded condition and the sudden increase in commitments is 
due to the present industrial condition. Eight hundred seventy-six (876) boys 
were dealt with during the year and in order to keep the average as low as it was, 
the length of stay in school was cut from ten months, as for some years past, to 
8.3 months for 1930. 

These conditions have placed a tremendous pressure on the facilities of the 
school. When the group membership changes as rapidly as it has during the past 
year, there is little time to develop leaders, common interests, or a sense of depend- 
ence or obligation. 

This extreme overcrowding may be considered only temporary, but for several 
years past the school has been filled to capacity. This makes impossible the 
segregation of boys of widely different types into such groups as will make for the 
best results in management and training. Obviously young, inexperienced lads 
should not be placed with larger, older, sophisticated types. Yet with a crowded 
school, the boy is likely to find himself in a group for which he is not fitted. If 
the school is to work well, even under a normal rate of commitments, there should 
be added to the present available nine cottages, one, if not two more units for 
housing thirty boys each. 

Our lads cannot be trained to become skilled workmen in the short time they 
are with us ; yet it is possible to develop in them an interest in the accomplishment 
of worth-while tasks, and for many of those who, through continued academic 
failure, have lost confidence in themselves, there is a marked development of 
confidence and self respect. 

The boys have been doing particularly well in their occupational training, due 
in part to the practice of studying the boy and his needs before assignment is made 
to any department — for example, the cabinet or machine shop, the garden group, 
the bakery, etc. There is taken into account the lad's physical and mental 



Pt. I. 43 

equipment, his temperament, and the probable chance of his using in the future the 
knowledge and skill acquired. Also by a personal interview, the lad's personal 
preference is found, and so far as possible, given first consideration. 

The physical condition of the boys admitted to the institution has, during the 
past year, been generally poor. A boy is rarely found who has not at least one 
physical defect. Major defects such as cardiac, pulmonary and spinal afflictions 
seem to be encountered with increasing frequency. However, after an average 
stay at the school of eight months, the boys' general condition is greatly improved, 
and in addition, there is an average gain in weight of about eleven pounds. 

This year the farm and garden crops were very satisfactory. In addition to an 
adequate supply of winter vegetables and apples, there are 22,000 quarts of canned 
vegetables, 10,000 quarts of canned fruit, and 11,000 quarts of apple butter avail- 
able for use during the coming year. 

About five acres of the new athletic field have been loamed and seeded down. 
The first five acres seeded down two years ago will be opened up for use in the 
spring of 1931. 

With an appropriation of $166,500 plus $155.73 brought forward from balance 
of 1929, the amount available for maintenance was $166,655.73. Of this amount 
$160,031.09 was expended. Of the amount expended, $75,757.57 was for salaries, 
wages and labor; all other expenses, $84,273.52. Net weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, 
$9,584. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $752.71. 
Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $159,278.38. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 4.2. 
The trustees estimate that $169,550 will be necessary for maintenance in 1931. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following estimate, with a request 
for a special appropriation covering the same : 
1. For construction, equipment and furnishings of a brick cottage for 50 

boys $80,000 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER. 

Miss' Catharine M. Campbell, Superintendent. 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 
Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $572,118.41. Normal capacity of 
plant, 268. Value per unit of capacity, $2,175.35. Founded in 1854 as a private 
institution. Taken over by the State in 1856. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent girls under seven- 
teen years of age at time of commitment. 

Numbers. 

Males 
Number Dec. 1, 1929 
Admitted during year . ■ 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining November 30, 1930 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 

Daily average employees during year .... 25 

Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year 

The list of causes of admission for 177 commitments of the 284 cases received at 
the school during the year is as follows : breaking and entering and larceny, 1 ; 
delinquent child, 8; disturbing peace, 1; fornication, 14.; idle and disorderly 
person, 1; larceny, 10; lewdness, 17; lewd and lascivious cohabitation, 2; lewd 
and lascivious person in speech and behavior, 22; neglecting minor child, 1; run- 
away, 10; stubborn child, 80; stubborn and disobedient child, 1; unnatural acts, 1; 
transferred from Division of Child Guardianship, 5 (delinquent; stubborn child; 
runaway; larceny); vagrancy, 2; using an auto without authority, 1. 

Of the above, 54, or 31 per cent, were of American parentage; 85, or 48 per cent, 
were of foreign parentage. 

Recalled to the school, 49, — from court, 3; from running from the school, 6; 
from hospitals, 33; for a visit, 2. In addition to the above 57 were returned from 
parole: viz., for medical care, 8; for further training, 28; for violation of parole, 21. 



Females 


Total 


293 


293 


284 


284 


272 


272 


305 


305 


547 


547 


315 


315 


54 


79 


336 


336 


290 


290 



44 P. D 17. 

The average length of stay in the school of all girls was 1 year, 4 months and 25 
days. 

Of the 272 girls released from the school during the year, 91 were released on 
parole to parents or relatives ; on parole to parents to attend school, 22 ; on parole 
to other families for wages, 95; on parole to other families to attend school, 4; for 
a visit home, 5; from visit to Industrial School, 2; to attend court, 3; ran from 
Industrial School for Girls, 6; transferred to hospitals, 41; transferred to Reform- 
atory for Women, 1; committed to hospital for insane, 1. 

As in every school community the defective, the retarded, the normal and the 
supernormal child may be found, so in the institution like conditions prevail, with 
varying needs which must be met. Our problem increases the challenge when it 
is realized that the contact is for a comparatively short time, with children of poor 
environment and background, of unhappy experiences, of a lack in emotional 
control, of anti-social traits and of psychopathic tendencies. 

To meet the problems presented in a constructive manner, there must be a real 
interest on the part of those in charge. There must be understanding and ability 
to analyze the problems in both a human and scientific spirit, and the application 
of such knowledge to the problem in hand. 

In providing for the variety of needs, every educational facility within our power 
must be used. There must be as flexible a program as possible, hand work alter- 
nating with academic work in such proportions as may be advisable for the indi- 
vidual girl. 

The school curriculum is based on that of the public school, but varied as indi- 
vidual need requires. From the very fact that the home life of the average girl 
committed has been so distorted, it is felt the more necessary to present work in 
home-making, including practical cooking, home hygiene, and industrial hand work. 

Special thought has been given this past year to the group of very young girls. 
They have had extra time school work, some hand work, simple folk dancing and 
games, as well as supervised play. 

The physical education department has provided classes in setting-up exercises, 
folk dancing and games. 

Realizing the value of music in mental development, much time has been spent 
in both chorus and class work. Pageants have been given on religious and civic 
holidays during the year, with music as an important feature of these presentations. 

The girls have shown a good spirit during the year. They have been interested 
and progress has been made, both as regards to general attitude toward school 
work, and actual work accomplished. 

As a feature of the Public Welfare exhibit of the Tercentenary celebration of the 
Commonwealth's activities, held at Springfield and Boston, a typical parole outfit 
was supplied, showing garments for girls to be placed in families to go to school, 
and for girls to be paroled to house work positions. A number of baskets and 
typical pieces of needle work were also exhibited. In addition, the girls made the 
curtains and table runners used in the cottage that housed the Public Welfare 
exhibit. 

The farm produced fruit and potatoes with a normal amount of garden vege- 
tables. Over 300,000 pounds of milk were produced, and 4,650 pounds of butter 
made for consumption at the institution. One thousand two hundred (1,200) 
pounds of beef were dressed. The swineherd supplied 12,200 pounds of pork; 
and the poultry department produced 2,640 pounds of chicken and 3,180 dozen 
eggs. 

The extension to the hospital which was started in 1929 was completed this year, 
and the report shows that at the hospital, there were 10,151 out-patients treated, 
and 409 ward patients. An average number of 4 patients were in the hospital. 

The dentist reports seeing 1,041 girls, while the specialist in eye, ear, nose and 
throat has seen 706 girls. • 

From an appropriation of $157,000 a total of $150,048.79 was expended for 
maintenance of this institution. Of the amount expended $71,702 was for salaries, 
wages and labor; all other expenses, $78,346.79. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, $9,077. 
Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $1,045.61. Net cost 
of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $149,003.18. Ratio of daily average number 



Pt.l. 



45 
The trustees 



of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3.9 
estimate that $162,370 will be necessary for maintenance in 1931. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following estimate, with request 
for a special appropriation covering the same: 
1. For construction, equipment and furnishings of a brick cottage for girls . $75,000 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS. 

In the matter of financial supervision, the Department examines and analyzes 
institution expenditures, keeping constantly in mind the function of the institution 
and the relation of its business to the care, education, and welfare of the inmates. 
The following tables are designed to show in detail the financial condition of each 
institution. 

Capacity, Population and Inventory. 

Table I gives in brief a statistical representation of the size and value of the five 
institutions under the supervision of the Department. Part I deals with the 
number of persons served by the institutions. Part II deals with the value of 
the property. 

Table I. — Part I. — Capacities and Population of the Five Institutions for the 
Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1930. 





Normal 
Capacity 


Present Any 
One Time 


Daily Average Number 
Present during Year 


institutions 


Largest 
Number 


Smallest 
Number 


1930 


1929 


1928 


State Infirmary 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 


2,800 
316 
480 
290 
263 


3,058 
336 
541 
345 
336 


2,633 
184 
435 
274 
290 


2,826.00 
306 . 20 
483.99 
319.00 
315.25 


2,567 . 16 
283.30 
522.97 
295.00 
307.95 


2,574.00 
271.20 
499 . 14 
297.00 
304.00 


Totals ..... 


4.149 


4,616 


3,816 


4,250.44 


3,976.38 


3,945.34 



Table I. — Part II. — 


Inventory of the Five Institutions, November 30, 1930. 




Real and Personal Estate 


INSTITUTIONS 


land 


Personal Total 




Acres Value 


Buildings Property Value 



State Infirmary- 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Giris 

Totals . 



894.00 
165.72 
535 . 50 
889.15 
353.90 



$83,679 94 
37,656 00 
50,553 67 

33,288 00 
18,805 00 



2,838.27 *223,982 61 



$2,086,558 12 
607,647 56 
635,319 00 
528,390 15 
445,289 55 



$484,249 08 
112,973 84 
166,690 10 
138,082 01 
108,023 86 



$2,654,487 14 
758,277 40 
852,562 77 
699,760 16 
572,118 41 



$4,303,204 38 $1,010,018 



$5,537,205 88 



46 



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48 P. D. 17. 

Table III. — Part II. — Expenditures of the Five Institutions for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 30, 1930 — Continued. 



For Special Purposes 



INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Furnish- 
ing and 
Equipping 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Total 


State Infirmary 

Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 


$2,000 00 
1,506 32 


$39,245 74 
29,750 78 
65,194 61 

4,139 41 


$12,764 39 


$3,886 97 
6,145 70 


$57,897 10 

29,750 78 

65,194 61 

6.145 70 

5,645 73 


Totals .... 


$3,506 32 


$147,961 15 


$12,764 39 


$10,032 67 


$164,633 92 



Table III. — Part III 


— Summary of Expenditures for the Fiscal 
November 30, 1930 — Concluded. 


Year ending 


INSTITUTIONS 


Maintenance 


Special 
Purposes 


Trust 
Funds 


Total 


State Infirmary 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 


. $1,045,552 05 

199.454 45 

239.455 99 
160,031 09 
150,048 79 


$57,897 10 
29,750 78 
65,194 61 

5,645 73 


$6,370 51 
195 79 


$1,103,449 15 
229,205 23 
311,021 11 
166,176 79 
155,890 31 


Totals 


. $1,794,542 37 


$164,633 92 


$6,566 30 


$1,965,742 59 






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Pt.l. 



51 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS. 



Under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 77, section 2, the five county 
training schools for truants and habitual school offenders are subject to the visita- 
tion of this Department, which is required to report thereon in its annual report. 
The names of the schools and of the Superintendents are as follows: 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence, W. Grant Fancher. 
Hampden County Training School, Springfield (Feeding Hills), Jim R. Smith. 
Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford, J. Earl Wolton. 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School, Walpole, James H. Craig. 
Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston), Alton W. Peirce. 

Table I shows the trend of the population in the County Training Schools during 
the past five years. 

Table I. — County Training Schools — Average number in Schools during the 

Years 1926-1980. 



Essex County Training School .... 

Hampden County Training School .... 
Middlesex County Training School .... 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School 
Worcester County Training School .... 

Totals 



1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


93.6 


96.9 


97.4 


81.4 


92.7 


42.0 


46.0 


44.0 


49.0 


43.0 


94.2 


95.7 


89.1 


94.7 


103.0 


26.0 


28.0 


30.9 


29.0 


25.3 


42.6 


38.2 


34.2 


38.4 


33.0 



298.4 



304. 



295.6 



292.5 297.0 



Table II shows the numbers and the movement of the population in these insti- 
tutions for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1930, and also the average weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, SI 1.38, subtracting all receipts from private sources. 

As it will be seen from Table II there were 463 children in the five schools during 
1930. The year opened with 299. In the succeeding twelve months 165 were 
admitted and 190 were discharged, leaving 271. 

The average age of the children at the time of their admittance was thirteen 
years, six months, twenty-eight days. Every child must be discharged, by require- 
ments of the statute, upon reaching the age of sixteen. 

Table II. — County Training Schools — Number and Movement of Population. 

















Main- 






Number 


in School duri: 


the Year 




tenance 
















of Schools 
(Average 


School 












Remain- 




Whole 


Average 


On 




Released 


ing on 


Weekly 




Number 


N umber 


Jan. 1, 


Admitted 


or Dis- 


Dec. 31, 


per Capita 








1930 




charged 


1930 


Cost) 


Essex County Training School . 


128 


92.7 


86 


42 


38 


90 


$11.18 


HampdenCountyTraining School 


62 


43.0 


49 


14 


30 


32 


12.09 


Middlesex CountyTraining School 


178 


103.0 


102 


76 


84 


94 


10.02 


Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth 
















Union Training School . 


46 


25.3 


24 


22 


22 


22 


16.96 


Worcester Training School 


49 


33.0 


38 


11 


16 


33 


10.95 


Totals .... 


463 


297.0 


299 


165 


190 


271 


11.38 



LICENSING OF BOARDING HOMES FOR AGED PERSONS. 

Francis Bar dwell, Supervisor. 

Under General Laws, Chapter 121, Section 22A, Inserted by Acts of 1929, 
Chapter 305, this Department has granted, up to the close of the fiscal year, 145 
licenses. 

By municipalities, these licenses are distributed as follows: 



Acushnet, 1 
Andover, 1 
Arlington, 1 
Belmont, 2 
Berkley, 1 
Beverly, 1 
Boston, 30 
Braintree, 2 
Brockton, 3 
Brookline, 10 
Cambridge, 6 
Cohasset, 1 
Everett, 1 
Fairhaven, 1 
Fitchburg, 2 



Framingham, 3 
Grafton, 1 
Hanson, 1 
Haverhill, 5 
Hingham, 1 
Holbrook, 1 
Hopkinton, 1 
Leominster, 1 
Lexington, 1 
Lincoln, 1 
Lowell, 1 
Lynn, 6 
Maiden, 3 
Marlborough, 1 
Medford, 3 



Melrose, 3 
Methuen, 1 
Milton, 1 
New Bedford, 2 
Newburypoit, 2 
Newton, 4 
Northborough, 1 
Peabody, 2 
Pittsfield, 1 
Quincy, 2 
Revere, 1 
Rockport, 1 
Somerset, 1 
Somerville, 1 
Springfield, 4 



Stoneham, 1 
Sudbury, 1 
Swampscott, 3 
Wakefield, 2 
Waltham, 4 
Watertown, 5 
Wayland, 1 
Westborough, 
Weymouth, 1 
Whitman, 3 
Winchester, 2 
Winthrop, 1 



Total 145, 



52 



P. D. 17. 



No contract or life care cases have been accepted by any of the licensed homes 
since the enactment of the bill. It is felt that this type of agreement will not be 
attempted, because of conditions safeguarding the welfare of the aged persons as 
imposed by the Department. 

In the main, the people engaged in the business of caring for aged people are 
kindly, conscientious women eager to comply with the Department's policies and 
anxious to hold their clientage. 

Prices for board and care of aged persons in the various homes range from $8 to 
$75 per week. 

The following policies have been adopted by the Department relative to licensing 
Boarding Homes for Aged Persons: 

1. No contract for life care or for care for more than five years shall be made 
by such a home unless the State Department of Public Welfare has been 
notified, and unless a bond or other security has been deposited with the 
State Treasurer in an amount approved by the Department. 

2. The endorsement of the local board of public welfare shall be obtained upon 
the application for a license before it is sent to the State Department. 

This endorsement is not sought as a matter of recommendation, but to allow 
the local board to know that the applicant is contemplating maintaining a Boarding 
Home for Aged Persons. The applicant must furnish the Department with names 
and addresses of at least three references, and the names of local physicians are 
preferable as references. 

Local boards of selectmen in towns and building inspection departments in cities 
are always notified of applications and local regulations must be complied with 
before a license can be granted. 

Under the law, licenses are for a term of two years, but they may be revoked at 
any time by the Department of Public Welfare. 

The Department maintains a list for the use of people seeking boarding homes 
for relatives or friends. These are filed by localities, prices, and names of people 
maintaining licensed homes. 



SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUPPORTED 
BY CITIES AND TOWNS. 

General Laws, chapter 117, sections 3, 36, 37 and 38, and chapter 121, section 
16, provide that the Department of Public Welfare may visit and inspect all places 
where city or town poor are supported in families, and require the Department to 
visit, at least once a year, not only all children who are maintained by the Com- 
monwealth, but all minor children who are supported at the expense of any city 
or town. Children illegally retained in city or town infirmaries must be removed 
therefrom and placed at board at the expense of the city or town concerned. 



The Settled Adult Poor provided for in Families. 
Of the 293 adult persons reported by local authorities as fully supported in fami- 
lies on January 1, 1930, 23 had died and 10 had been removed before visits could 
be made. The remaining 260 — 144 men and 116 women — were all visited and 
reported on by the department's agents. They were supported by 117 cities and 
towns as follows: 



Abington, 3 
Acton, 1 
Acushnet, 3 
Amherst, 3 
Arlington, 5 
Ashby, 1 
Ashland, 1 
Athol, 1 
Attleboro, 4 
Barnstable, 1 
Bedford, 1 
Belchertown, 4 
Bernardston, 1 
Bourne, 1 
Boxford, 1 
Braintree, 2 



Buckland, 3 
Carver, 1 
Charlemont, 2 
Chatham, 1 
Chelmsford, 1 
Chelsea, 1 
Cheshire, 2 
Chicopee, 1 
Clarksburg, 2 
Cohasset, 1 
Colrain, 2 
Conway, 4 
Dana, 1 
Danvers, 11 
Dedham, ] 
Dighton, 2 



Dudley, 2 


Holbrook, 3 


East Longmeadovv, 1 


Hopedale, 2 


Edgartown, 5 


Kingston, 6 


Enfield. 2 


Lakeville, 3 


Erving, 2 


Lawrence, 1 


Florida, 2 


Leicester, 1 


Framingham, 1 


Lenox, 2 


Freetown, 3 


Leverett, 1 


Gill, 2 


Leyden, 2 


Goshen, 1 


Ludlow, 2 


Grafton, 1 


Lunenburg, 1 


Great Barrington, 6 


Lynn, 1 


Hancock, 2 


Mansfield, 1 


Hanover, 1 


Marlborough, 


Heath, 2 


Medfield, 3 


Hingham, 1 


Melrose, 3 



Southbridge, 1 
Southwick, 1 
Topsfielci, 5 
Townsend, 2 
Walpole, 5 
Wareham, 1 
Watertown, 4 
Wellesley, 1 
Wellfleet, 2 
Wendell, 1 
West Newbury, 1 
West Springfield, 3 
West Stockbridge, 1 



West Tisbury, 1 
West borough, 1 
Weston, 2 
Westport, 1 
Weymouth, 2 
Whately, 1 
Whitman, 9 
Wilbraham, 2 
Willian stown, 3 
Winchester, 3 
Winthrop, 2 
Woburn, 3 
Yarmouth, 2 



Pt. I. 53 

Merrimac, 3 Peabody, 3 

Middleborough, 1 Petersham, 1 

Millville, 2 Quincy, 2 

Montague, 1 Raynham, 2 

Needham, 5 Reading, 2 

New Marlborough, 3 Rehoboth, 4 

New Salem, 1 Revere, 7 

North Reading, 1 Rocidand, 1 

Northborough, 3 Rowley, 1 

Norton, 3 Royalston, 2 

Norwood, 4 Rutland, 1 

Oak Bluffs, 1 Salisbury, 1 

Orange, 2 Sheffield, 3 
Otis, 2 

Their ages were as follows: two between 21 and 30; three between 30 and 40; 
eight between 40 and 50; twenty-two between 50 and 60; fifty-five between 60 
and 70; ninety-four between 70 and 80 ; seventy between 80 and 90 ; four between 
90 and 100; one between 100 and 110; one age unknown. 

For their support there was paid in one case from $1 to $2 per week; in four 
cases from $2 to $3 per week; in twenty-two cases from $3 to $4 per week; and 
in two hundred thirty-three cases — mostly of old and feeble persons — the rate 
varied from $4 to $15 per week according to the amount of care required. 

Of the whole number, 124 were reported to be in good or fairly good physical 
condition and 231 in good or fairly good mental condition. In all but three cases 
they were apparently receiving good care, and these cases were brought to the 
attention of the members of the local board. There were 70 able to do light work 
either in the house or about the premises. In 226 cases, according to the reports, 
the members of the local boards of public welfare complied with the law requiring 
them to visit these persons at least once in every six months; in 13 cases they were 
visited once during the year; in 15 cases they were not visited at all; and in 6 
cases no record of visit could be found. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for in 

Infirmaries. 
Visits were made to 31 children — 17 boys and 14 girls — reported to be cared 
for by the following cities and towns in their infirmaries: 

Barnstable, 1 Holyoke, 5 Springfield, 11 

Braintree, 1 Lawrence, 5 Westford, 3 

Fitchburg, 1 Northampton, 1 Worcester, 3 

In addition to this number, 59 had been removed from the infirmaries before the 
time of visitation. Of the number visited, 9 were so defective in either mind or 
body as to make their retention in an infirmary desirable. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for Outside 

Infirmaries. 
As shown by the department's visitation of the 1,371 children reported by the 
authorities as fully supported outside the infirmaries on January 1, 1930, and July 
1, 1930, 172 had been removed before visits could be made, 5 had died, and 7 were 
supporting themselves. The remaining 1,187 — 675 boys and 512 girls — were 
supported by the 80 cities and towns as follows: 

Enfield, 1 
Everett, 2 
Fairhaven, 3 
Fitchburg, 7 
Framingham, 1 
Georgetown, 1 
Great Barrington, 1 
Greenfield, 1 
Ipswich, 1 
Lawrence, 4 
Lynn, 23 
Maiden, 4 
Medford, 3 
Merrimac, 2 



Adams, 7 
Ashburnham, 2 
Attleboro, 3 
Beverly, 5 
Boston, 688 
Boxborough, 1 
Braintree, 6 
Brockton, 18 
Buckland, 1 
Cambridge, 10 
Chelsea, 1 
Chicopee, 2 
Clinton, 2 
Colrain, 1 
Concord, 2 
Danvers, 2 
Dartmouth, 1 
Dedham, 3 
Deerfield, 1 
Easthampton, 1 



Middleborough, 
Milford, 2 
Millbury, 1 
Montague, 1 
Natick, 4 
Needham, 2 



New Bedford, 63 
Newburyport, 9 
Newton, 2 
North Andover, 4 
Northborough, 5 
Norton, 1 
Norwood, 3 
Palmer, 5 
Peabodv, 1 
Pittsfield, 1 
Quincy, 3 
Rochester, 9 
Rockland, 8 
Russell, 2 
Salem, 18 
Salisbury, 1 
Saugus, 3 
Somerville, 15 
Southbridge, 3 
Springfield, 9 



Stockbridge, 1 
Stow, 1 
Taunton, 5 
Uxbridge, 2 
Walpole, 2 
Wareham, 3 
Washington, 3 
Watertown, 5 
Webster, 5 
Wellesley, 1 
Wellfleet, 2 
West Newbury, 1 
West Springfield, 2 
Westborough, 2 
Westfield, 1 
Weymouth, 10 
Whitman, i 
Wilbraham, 4 
Winchendon, 6 
Worcester, 136 



Of the whole number 76 were cared for and treated in hospitals and institutions. 
There were 849 who attended school, and 203 who did more or less work about the 



54 P. D. 17. 

house. Of the whole number, 1,150 were in good or fairly good physical condition, 
and 1,123 in good or fairly good mental condition. The price of board varies from 
$1.50 to $7.50 per week. These children were found to be well cared for with a 
few exceptions, which have been brought to the attention of the local boards of 
public welfare. 

The Penalty incurred by certain Cities and Towns for Failure to make 
their returns of poor relief during the month of april, 1930 
Under sections 32-35 of chapter 117 of the General Laws, the department 
reported to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth the names of the cities and towns 
which failed to make their returns of poor relief during the month of April, 1930, 
together with the amount of penalty incurred in each instance as follows : Acushnet, 
$8; Agawam, $1; Bedford, $1; Boxford, $6; Brimfield, $8; Chester, $1; Clinton, 
$1; Deerfield, $1; Dracut, $34; Easton, $8; Fall River, $23; Florida, $1; Gay 
Head, $1; Goshen, $1; Hancock, $4; Harwich, $11; Lanesborough, $11; Long 
meadow, $1; Mashpee, $11; Middleborough, $2; Montgomery, $11; Nahant, $33 
New Braintree, $20; North Attleboro, $215; Oakham, $4; Princeton, $274 
Rehoboth, $1; Rochester, $9; Sandisfield, $11; Sandwich, $33; Southwick, $4 
Sunderland, $8; Wayland, $216; Wendell, $1; West Boylston, $5 ; Westborough 
$9; Westford, $11; Williamstown, $6; Winchester, $11; Woburn, $6; Total, $1,023. 



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

The Commissioner of Public Welfare made four recommendations for legislation 
for 1931. These recommendations were forwarded to the Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth on December 3, 1930, in accordance with the provisions of section 33 
of chapter 30 of the General Laws, as amended by section 43 of chapter 362 of the 
Acts of 1923. The recommendations were as follows: 

1. Special Commission to Study the Laws relating to Town Planning 
and Zoning. 

There is need for a comprehensive study by a special commission to consolidate 
and clarify our existing laws relating to planning, boards of survey and zoning. 
When the planning law was enacted, it was drafted chiefly with one objective in 
view, a specific accomplishment. Our original planning law is devoted primarily 
to the subject of homesteads, and incidentally to planning. Planning is now the 
major objective of the whole movement, and the statutes are inadequate to carry 
out this purpose. 

The laws of many other States as regarding planning are more specific and com- 
prehensive than ours. They give broad powers to planning boards to study and 
to make recommendations in all matters affecting the physical growth of a town. 
They provide for rigid subdivision control as regards street systems, lot sizes, set- 
backs and the location of buildings, and other matters affecting the proper devel- 
opment of the town plan. They provide for regional and county planning com- 
missions when there are problems common to two or more municipalities. 

The United States Department of Commerce has, after a long study, prepared 
and published a standard planning enabling law, which has been followed in the 
laws of New York, California and New Jersey. 

I recommend a study of this subject by a special commission as provided in the 
accompanying bill. 

2. Relative to the Method of Repealing Zoning Ordinances and 
By-Laws. 

When a town has adopted a comprehensive zoning by-law, it should not be 
repealed without proper deliberation. The statute, in regard to the method of 
repealing zoning by-laws, provides that an article in the warrant for repeal may be 
referred to a committee to report, and that immediately thereafter action may be 
taken to repeal the by-law. In practice this often prevents the proper deliberation 
which is desirable. If there is no written objection to the proposal for repeal, 
the town meeting may act immediately without even reference to a committee. 
To allow an established system of zoning real estate to be upset by such hasty and 
immature consideration is injurious to the property interests and to all the interests 
of the town. In cities repeal cannot be effected without an advertised hearing. 



Pt. I. 55 

To secure the proper deliberation by a town meeting for such a repeal, it is rec- 
ommended that any proposal for repeal must be referred to the planning board, 
or to the selectmen where there is no planning board, who must advertise a hearing 
and then report on the facts to the town meeting or to an adjourned town meeting. 
To accomplish this result the accompanying bill is recommended. 

3. Relative to Authorizing Cities and Towns to Establish Zones in 
Which Billboards are Prohibited. 

The zoning of cities and towns has progressed rapidly in Massachusetts, but it is 
not yet possible to prohibit billboards in any section from which the town desires 
to exclude them. Cities and towns are given large powers, by section 25 of chapter 
40 of the General Laws, to establish zones or districts in which the land-owner is 
restricted as to the use of his property. Among the purposes of this law, as ex- 
pressed in the last two sentences, is the purpose to improve and beautify the city 
or town, and to assist in carrying out any scheme for municipal improvements 
put forth by any municipal planning board. 

The statute enabled towns to zone and district buildings. This statute was 
found to leave a loophole in that it did not apply to structures which could not 
strictly be termed buildings. For this reason the statute was amended by chapter 
116 of the Acts of 1925, by inserting the words "structures and premises" after the 
word "buildings." But even this broad language was held by the Supreme Court 
not to have intended to include one class of structures — namely, billboards and 
other advertising devices — because of the existence of another statute, section 29 
of chapter 93 of the General Laws, under which towns were given the power to 
regulate billboards. 

We do not believe that it was the intention of the Legislature, in conferring upon 
towns the power of regulating and restricting billboards, to prevent the towns from 
zoning or districting billboards as it can zone and district all other structures. 
One of the primary purposes of zoning is to protect certain use areas from the 
intrusion of injurious uses. This protection shall be separate from and independent 
of regulatory laws, which control the operation of certain uses in the areas in which 
they are permitted. Thus, victuallers are licensed under regulations in the interest 
of the public health, where they are permitted under the zoning law. But the 
zoning law is final as to where restaurants may be located. It is common custom 
to prevent such a use in a residential area. The same applies to garages, filling 
stations, undertaking establishments and many other uses. To make it clear 
that a town has the power to zone billboards as well as other structures, the accom- 
panying bill is recommended. 

4. Relative to Annual Reports of Charitable Trusts. 

An amendment is necessary to perfect the law which was enacted last year rela- 
tive to the annual reports of charitable trusts. Chapter 209 of the Acts of 1930 
was enacted for the purpose of extending the system of annual reporting to this 
Department by charitable corporations so as to include reports from all charitable 
trusts. The annual reports by charitable corporations had resulted in a certain 
amount of supervision which had proved wholesome and desirable to extend to all 
charitable trusts. 

The purpose of the new extension was not quite accomplished. The new law 
was phrased to include "every unincorporated trustee" who holds property in 
trust for charitable purposes. This phrase failed to include trust companies acting 
as trustees of charitable funds. Trust companies are not charitable corporations 
and had not been required to report under the earlier law. They are not "unin- 
corporated trustees" because they are incorporated as trust companies, and there- 
fore do not come within the provisions of the new law. In order to make the 
statute of 1930 cover all charitable trusts, and to stop up the loophole which its 
language unintentionally leaves, the accompanying bill is recommended. 

5. Proposal for a Legislative Amendment of the Constitution Elim- 
inating the Word "Pauper." 

The word "pauper" has been eliminated from the relief laws of the Common- 
wealth. I recommend that it be eliminated from the Constitution. Chapter 155 
of the Acts of 1928 eliminated the word "pauper" from the relief laws of the 



56 P. D. 17. 

Commonwealth. This was one of a series of reforms in public welfare practice in 
Massachusetts which has accomplished a great deal in the humanizing and liberal- 
izing of public relief. Along with the change of the "almshouse" to "infirmary," 
and the change of the "overseers of the poor" to "boards of public welfare," a 
modern and satisfactory system of public welfare administration has been set up 
which provides a suitable basis for the administration of old age assistance. To 
allow the word "pauper" still to remain in the Constitution and in the election laws 
would somewhat impair the completeness of this system. As the word has been 
eliminated from every other statute, it can have no definable meaning in the Con- 
stitution or in the election laws. In practice it has disappeared. It is a word 
which has been so outgrown that its continuance in law greatly handicaps good 
relief work. When we aid a person today we try as far as possible to preserve his 
self-respect and to avoid pauperizing him, striving to restore him as rapidly as 
possible to a condition of self-support. 

To complete the elimination of this word from the law as well as from practice, 
it is recommended that Article III of the Amendments of the Constitution be 
amended by striking out, in line two, the words "paupers and." If this Consti- 
tutional amendment is enacted, it is recommended that legislation be introduced 
to eliminate the word "pauper" from the second line of section 1 of chapter 51 of 
the General Laws. 



LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT PASSED BY THE 
LEGISLATURE OF 1930. 

Chapter 170. — An Act requiring the Registration of Foreign 
Charitable Corporations before acting in the Commonwealth, 
and relative to reports by such corporations. 
Section 1. Section twelve of chapter one hundred and eighty of the General 
Laws is hereby amended by inserting after the word "corporation" in the first line, 
the words: — incorporated in this commonwealth, — so as to read as follows: — 
Section 12. A charitable corporation incorporated in this commonwealth whose 
personal property is exempt from taxation shall annually, on or before November 
first, make to the department of public welfare a written report for its last financial 
year, showing its property, its receipts and expenditures, the whole number and 
the average number of its beneficiaries and such other information as the depart- 
ment requires. If any corporation subject to this section fails for two successive 
years to file said report, the supreme judicial court, upon application by the depart- 
ment, after notice and hearing, may decree a dissolution of the corporation. 

Section 2. Said chapter one hundred and eighty is hereby amended by inserting 
after section twelve the following new section: — Section 12 A. A charitable cor- 
poration established, organized or chartered under laws other than those of the 
commonwealth, except the Grand Army of the Republic, the United Spanish War 
Veterans, The American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United 
States, shall, before engaging in charitable work or raising funds in the common- 
wealth, file with the department of public welfare a copy of its charter, articles or 
certificate of incorporation, certified under the seal of the state or country where 
such corporation is incorporated, by the secretary of state thereof or by the officer 
having charge of the original record therein, and a true copy of its constitution and 
by laws, and shall also file with the department such other information as may from 
time to time be required by it. Such a corporation shall annually, on or before 
November first, make to said department a written report such as is required by 
section twelve to be made by charitable corporations subject thereto. Every 
officer of such a corporation which fails to comply with the requirements of this 
section who authorizes or transacts, and every agent of such a corporation who 
transacts, business in behalf of such corporation in this commonwealth, shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars. Upon an information 
in equity in the name of the attorney general at the relation of the commissioner 
of public welfare, the supreme judicial or superior court may restrain the violation 
of this section by such a corporation or the transaction of any business in its behalf 
by any officer or agent while such violation continues. [Approved April 2, 1930.] 



Pt. I. 57 

Chapter 209. — An Act requiring certain Unincorporated Trustees of 
Charitable Trusts to file Annual Reports with the Department of 
Public Welfare. 
Chapter sixty-eight of the General Laws is hereby amended by adding thereto 
the following new section: — Section 15. Every unincorporated trustee who holds 
in trust within the commonwealth property given, devised or bequeathed for 
benevolent, charitable, humane or philanthropic purposes and administers, or is 
under a duty to administer, the same in whole or in part for said purposes within 
the commonwealth shall annually, on or before November first, make to the depart- 
ment of public welfare a written report for the last preceding financial year of such 
trust, showing the property so held and administered, the receipts and expenditures 
in connection therewith, the whole number and the average number of beneficiaries 
thereof, and such other information as the department requires ; provided, that if 
any such trustee is required by law to file an account with the probate court, said 
department shall accept a copy thereof in lieu of the report hereinbefore required. 
Failure for two successive years to file such a report shall constitute a breach of 
trust within the meaning of section eight of chapter twelve and shall be reported 
by said department to the attorney general, who shall take such action as may be 
appropriate to compel compliance with this section. [Approved April 11, 1980.) 

Chapter 368. — An Act relative to the Education of Crippled Children. 

Chapter seventy-one of the General Laws is hereby amended by inserting after 
section forty-six the following new section: — Section 46 A. The school committee 
of every town shall annually ascertain, under regulations prescribed by the depart- 
ment and the commissioner of public welfare, the number of children of school age 
and resident therein who are crippled. In any town where, at the beginning of 
any school year, there are five or more children so crippled as to make attendance 
at a public school not feasible, and who are not otherwise provided for, the school 
committee shall, and in any town where there are less than five such children may, 
employ a teacher or teachers, on full or part time, who shall, with the approval in 
each case of the department and the said commissioner, offer instruction to said 
children in their homes or at such places and under such conditions as the committee 
may arrange. [Approved May 27, 1930.] 

Chapter 381. — An Act relative to the Furnishing of Aid to Mothers 
with Dependent Children. 

Section one of chapter one hundred and eighteen of the General Laws, as amended 
by chapter three hundred and seventy-six of the acts of nineteen hundred and 
twenty-two, is hereby further amended by adding at the end thereof the following 
sentence : — A mother shall not be disqualified from receiving aid under this 
chapter because of having but one such child. [Approved May 28, 1980.] 

Chapter 402. — An Act providing for Adequate Assistance to Certain 
Aged Citizens and for a Report by the Commissioner of Corpora- 
tions and Taxation as to Ways and Means for Raising the Required 
Revenue. 
Section 1. The General Laws are hereby amended by inserting after chapter 

one hundred and eighteen, under the title, Adequate Assistance to Certain Aged 

Citizens, the following new chapter : — 

Chapter 118A. Adequate Assistance to Certain Aged Citizens. 

Section 1. Adequate assistance to deserving citizens in need of relief and support 
seventy years of age or over who shall have resided in the commonwealth not less 
than twenty years immediately preceding arrival at such age, subject to such 
reasonable exceptions as to continuity of residence as the department of public 
welfare, in this chapter called the department, may determine by rules hereinafter 
authorized, shall be granted under the supervision of the department. Such 
assistance shall, wherever practicable, be given to the aged person in his own home 
or in lodgings or in a boarding home, and it shall be sufficient to provide such 
suitable and dignified care. No person receiving assistance hereunder shall be 
deemed to be a pauper by reason thereof. 



58 



P. D. 17. 



Section 2. Each board of public welfare shall, for the purpose of granting ade- 
quate assistance and service to such aged persons, establish a division thereof to be 
designated as the Bureau of Old Age Assistance. In determining the need for 
financial assistance, said bureaus shall give consideration to the resources of the 
aged person and to the ability of children and others to support such aged person. 
Separate records of all such aged persons who are aided shall be kept and reports 
returned in the manner prescribed by section thirty-four of chapter forty-one and 
by sections thirty-two and thirty-three of chapter one hundred and seventeen. 

Section 3. In respect to all aged persons in receipt of assistance under this 
chapter, the town rendering the assistance shall, after and subject to approval of 
the bills by the department and subject otherwise to the provisions of section 
forty-two of chapter one hundred and twenty-one, be reimbursed by the common- 
wealth for one-third of the amount of assistance given, or, if the person so aided 
has no settlement in the commonwealth, for the total amount thereof. If the 
person so aided has a legal settlement in another town, two-thirds of the amount 
of such assistance given may be recovered in contract against the town liable 
therefor in accordance with chapter one hundred and seventeen. 

Section 4. The department shall supervise the work done and measures taken 
by the boards of public welfare of the several towns in respect to persons aided and 
service given under this chapter; and for this purpose may make such rules relative 
to notice and reimbursement and such other rules relating to the administration of 
this chapter, as it deems necessary, and may visit any person aided, and shall have 
access to any records and other data kept by the boards of public welfare or their 
representatives relating to such assistance, and may require the production of 
books and papers and the testimony of witnesses under oath. 

Section 2. The commissioner of corporations and taxation is hereby directed 
to consider ways and means for raising the revenue required by the commonwealth 
and by the cities and towns thereof to carry out the terms of this act from sources 
which, so far as may be, will not constitute an additional burden on real estate, 
and shall especially consider some form of taxation on amusements, proprietary 
articles and luxuries, and shall report to the general court his findings and recom- 
mendations, together with drafts of legislation necessary to carry his recommen- 
dations into effect, by filing the same with the clerk of the house of representatives 
not later than the first Wednesday in December of the current year. 

Section 3. Section one of this act shall not become operative until July first, 
nineteen hundred and thirty-one. [Approved May 28, 1930.} 

PAST MEMBERS OF THE STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 

In this Department the service of unpaid Board members has always been of 
great value. It is the custom to record this service in the annual report. 



Date of 


Original 








Appointment 


Name 


Residence 


Retired 


June 


7, 1879 


Moses Kimball 


Boston 


. October 27, 1880 


June 


7, 1879 


Nathan Allen, M.D. 


Lowell . 


. June 7, 1880 


June 


7, 1879 


Henry I . Bowditch, M.D. 


Boston . 


. January 24, 1880 


June 


7, 1879 


Charles F. Donnelly . 


Boston 


. June 7, 1907 


June 


7, 1879 


Edward Hitchcock, M.D. . 


. Amherst . 


. June 7, 1906 


June 


7, 1879 


Albert Wood, M.D. . 


Worcester 


. June 7, 1880 


June 


7, 1879 


Robert T. Davis, M.D. 


. Fall River 


. January 22, 1884 


June 


7, 1879 


John C. Hoadley 


Lawrence 


. November 16, 1882 


June 


7, 1879 


Ezra Parmenler, M.D. 


. Cambridge 


. February 1883 


January- 


27, 1880 


David L. Webster 


Boston . 


. April 11, 1881 


June 


8, 1880 


Charles F.Folsom, M.D. . 


Boston 


. January 14, 1881 


June 


8, 1880 


Clara T. Leonard 


Springfield 


. March 19, 1886 


November 


S, 1880 


Thomas Talbot . 


Billerica . 


. March 12, 1884 


January 


22, 1881 


Alfred Hosmer, M.D. 


Watertown 


. December 4, 1882 


April 


18, 1881 


G eorge P. Carter 


. Cambridge 


. June 7, 1883 


November 23, 1882 


John Fallon 


Lawrence 


. December 15, 1889 


December 


8, 1882 


Henry P. Walcoit, M.D. . 


Cambridge 


. June 7,1885 


February 


14, 1883 


Albert A. Haggett 


Lowell 


. October 26, 1885 


May 


31, 1883 


Reuben Noble . 


. Westfield 


. June 16, 1885 


July 


18, 1883 


Edgar E. Dean, M.D. 


Brockton 


. December 1, 1887 


March 


19, 1884 


Everett Torrey 


Boston 


. August 16, 1886 


June 


16, 1885 


Charles A . Denny 


Leicester 


. November 4, 1889 


July- 


16, 1885 


Samuel A.Green, M.D. 


Boston 


. May 15, 1889 


April 


14, 1886 


Anne B. Richardson . 


Lowell 


. January 26, 1899 


April 


21. 1886 


Henrietta G. Codman 


Brookline 


. May 16, 1906 


December 22, 1886 


Richard L. Hodgdon, M.D. 


. Arlington 


. January 30, 1893 


December 22. 1886 


Charles C. Co fin 


Boston 


. December 17, 1889 


January 


25, 1888 


D. Webster King 


Boston . 


. August 5, 1889 



Pt. I. 

December 4, 
December 24, 
December 24, 
January 1, 
June 11, 

June 22, 

February 15, 
February 14, 
June 4, 

November 1G, 
June 22, 

July 7, 

February 23, 
December 13, 
August 7, 

December 9, 
December 9, 
January 14, 
June 6, 

June 20, 

June 12, 

June 16, 

December 30, 
August 11, 
August 11, 
November 29, 
June 20, 



1889 George W. Johnson . 

1889 Henry Stone . 

1889 I.aban Pratt 

1890 ZibaC. Keith . 

1891 Charles J. Curran, M.D. 

1893 Richard M. Hodges, M.D, 

1894 Leontine Lincoln 

1895 John L. Hildreth, M.D. 

1896 Edward H. Haskell . 

1897 JabezFox 

1898 Henry S. Nonrse 

1898 James M. Pullman, D.D. 

1899 Annette P. Rogers . 
1899 Frances Creelv Curtis 
1903 Joseph Walker 

1903 Charles H. Adams . 

1903 David F. Tilley 

1904 Charles R. Johnson . 
1906 A . C. Raishesky 

1906 Jeffrey R. Brackett . 

1907 Thomas Downey 
1909 Ada Eliot Sheffield . 

1914 Mary A. Barr . 

1915 Robert M. Merrick, M.D. 

1915 Charlotte J. Guild 

1916 Katherine H . Leonard 

1917 B. Preston Clark 



59 



Brookfieid 


. September 1, 1903 


Boston 


January 1, 1894 


Boston . 


June 7, 1909 


Brockton 


Tune 11. 1891 


North Aaams . 


June 7, 1896 


Boston . 


January 1, 1895 


Fall River 


November 30, 1919 


Cambridge 


July 2, 1898 


Newton . 


November 2, 1897 


Cambridge 


September 5, 1900 


Lancaster 


November 14, 1903 


Lynn 


November 22, 1903 


Boston . 


December 15, 1899 


Boston . 


September 3, 1915 


Brookline 


January 16, 1904 


Melrose . 


November 30, 1919 


Boston . 


August 17, 1919 


Worcester 


November 30, 1915 


Boston 


— - 


Boston 


— - 


Boston . 


June 27, 1917 


Cambridge 


December 31, 1914 


Boston . 


November 30, 1919 


Boston . 


November 30, 1919 


Boston 


August 1, 1916 


Springfield 


November 30, 1919 


Cohasset 


November 30, 1919 



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64 P. D. 17. 

Part II 
PRIVATE CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Richard K. Conant, Commissioner. 
Supervisors. 

Miss Caroline J. Cook, Chief. 
Miss Florence G. Dickson. 
Miss Alice M. McIntire. 

Government supervision of private charitable corporations is provided in three 
legislative enactments, the first of which requires the Department of Public Wel- 
fare to investigate all applications for charitable charters, while the second and 
third call for annual inspection and annual reporting. In the following pages of 
this part of the report the functions of the Department and the year's work under 
these several statutes are explained. This statement is followed by a tabulation 
of some of the essential figures showing the financial condition and the number of 
persons aided by the various charities. 

Investigation of Charitable Organizations Seeking Incorporation. 

During the year ending November 30, 1930, 70 applications for charters have been 
referred to this Department by the Secretary of the Commonwealth for investi- 
gation under General Laws, chapter 180, section 6. In 7 cases the applications were 
withdrawn from this department before the hearing. Three (3) cases are pending 
action of the Secretary of State at end of the year. Thirteen (13) cases are pending 
action of this department at end of the year. This department has investigated, 
given hearings and reported on 51 applications, including 1 received prior to the 
beginning of the year. 

Forty-eight (48) applications as listed below, have been acted upon by the Secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth. 

Academy of Podiatry, Inc., The 

Andrew H. Hodgdon Memorial Fund, Inc. 

Armenian Associates of Boston 

Associated Hebrew Schools of Greater Boston, Inc. 

Associated Jewish Philanthropies, Inc. 

Attleboro Museum of Art, The 

Bethel Home for the Aged 

Beverly Hebrew Community Center, Inc. 

Boston Retired Firemen's Association 

Brewster Woman's Club (Inc.), The 

Briggs Corner Welfare Association of Attleboro 

Butrimantz Social & Aid Association 

Corporal James C. Shea Post and Ladies' Auxiliary, Inc. 

Council for the Clinical Training of Theological Students, Inc. 

Davis Square Board of Trade 

Disabled Naval Veterans' Association, Inc. 

East Side Educational Center of Brockton, Massachusetts 

Exchange Club of Springfield, Inc., The 

Fitchburg Community Chest, Inc. 

Framingham Temple Association 

Gardner Lodge No. 1426, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Inc. p 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund, Inc. 

Joubeilite Great League Incorporated 

Ladyhouse Incorporated 

Lawrence Community Chest, Inc. 

Lowell Welfare Foundation, The 

Lynn Gold Star Mothers, Inc. 

Martinist Home, The 

Massachusetts Branch of Eastern Association on Indian Affairs, Inc. 

Massachusetts Italian Medical Society 



Pt. II. 65 

Massachusetts Veterans Association, Inc. 

Menauhant Religious & Charitable Association, Inc. 

Polish National Home Association of South Grafton, Massachusetts 

Portuguese Holy Ghost Society of Bridgewater, Inc. 

Resthaven Association, Inc., The 

Robert A. Woods Associates, Inc., The 

Saugus Visiting Nurse Association 

Scoutland, Inc. 

Seabury House, Incorporated 

Sharon Civic Foundation, The 

Stanley F. Wood Post, Department of Massachusetts, No. 145, American 

Legion 
Swampscott Visiting Nurse Association 
Tao Sanctorum, Inc. 
United Kosher Butchers Association 
Vaad Hoeer of Chelsea, Inc. 
West End House Alumni Association, Inc. 
Winthrop War Veterans Association, Inc. 
Woburn Hebrew Center 

Forty-seven (47) of these applications have been acted upon and charters issued. 
A charter has been withheld from the following: 

East Side Educational Center of Brockton, Massachusetts 

Inspection of Charitable Corporations. 

General Laws, chapter 121, section 7, requires the Department of Public Wel- 
fare, upon the request or with the consent of a charitable corporation, to make 
annual inspection or investigation of such corporation. 

Two hundred and four (204) inspections have been made during the past year, 
involving numerous conferences with directors and many visits to institutions. 

There have been 809 inquiries in regard to particular charities and general mat- 
ters connected with the field of private charity. 

Number and Classification of Incorporated Charities in Massachusetts. 

Of the 1,185 charitable corporations which made returns to this department 
during 1930, 120 are homes for the aged; 140 are child-helping agencies; 254 are 
hospitals or other institutions for aiding the sick; 131 are agencies giving family 
aid; and 176 are organizations doing community, neighborhood or club work. 
The remaining 364 corporations form a miscellaneous group chiefly civic or 
eleemosynary in their nature. 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations. 

General Laws, chapter 180, section 12, provides that every charitable corporation 
must make to this department an annual financial return on or before the first day 
of November in each year, and further provides that if any corporation fails for 
two successive years to make the report, the Supreme Court may decree its dis- 
solution. Figures from the financial reports of corporations for the last year are 
given on the following pages. The abstracts are arranged by towns in alpha- 
betical order under each town. 

An analysis of the returns made in 1930 shows the total property, real and per- 
sonal, of all these charities to be $315,539,069.33. Incumbrances on real estate 
came to but $11,383,079.49. Subscriptions and donations, including gifts restricted 
to capital, brought in $17,962,970.09. Earnings and refunds, including receipts 
from beneficiaries, amounted to $24,899,814.91. Interest, dividends, annuities 
and rentals brought in $9,872,161.80. Legacies were received to the amount of 
$5,674,110.51; of this sum $2,422,854.45 was unrestricted. The current receipts 
were $52,868,733.06. The current expenditures were $49,956,768.35 of which 
$17,204,705.91 was paid for salaries and wages. The agencies reported 18,511 
paid employees. 



66 P. D. 17. 

Endorsement of Private Charitable Organizations. 

The Department of Public Welfare endorses no private charitable organization 
or agency. This rule is absolute, regardless of the known standing of any such 
society. Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this volume do 
not mean approval; on the contrary, inspection may mean the discovery of con- 
ditions calling for condemnation. No agency is warranted, therefore, in using the 
fact of inspection in such manner as to lead the public to believe that the depart- 
ment approves or in any sense commends its work. 



68 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Abington 
Abington Visiting Nurse Association Inc. 
Abington Young Men's Christian Association 
County Committee of Young Men's Christian 
Associations of Plymouth County, Massa- 
chusetts, Incorporated, The l . 

Adams 
Polish Roman Catholic Society of St. Stanis- 

law Kostka of Adams, Massachusetts l 
Sisters of Providence (Greylock Rest) . 

Amesbury 
Amesbury and Salisbury Home for AgedWomen 
Amesbury Hospital Association, The 
Ladies' Charitable Society of Amesbury 

Amherst 
Amherst Boys Club, Inc. 
Amherst Home for Aged Women, The . 
Wilbur H. H. Ward Educational Trust, In 
corporated, The .... 

Andover 
Andover Guild, The .... 
Andover Home for Aged People 

Arlington 
Arlington Training School for Nurses, Inc., The 

Arlington Visiting Nursing Association Inc., The 
Order of St. Anne (St. John's House forChildren) 
Symmes Arlington Hospital (100 beds) 

Athol 
Athol Memorial Hospital (not in operation) 
Athol Young Men's Christian Association, The 

Attleboro 
Attleboro Community Chest, Inc., The 

Attleborough Hospital, The ( 125 beds) . 
Attleboro League for Girls and Women, Inc., The 
Attleboro Springs, Inc. (See New England 
Deaconess Association) .... 

Attleboro Young Mens Christian Association, 
The 

Family Welfare Association of Attleboro, 
Mass., Inc. ...... 

John Daggett-Frances A. Crandall Home for 
Aged Women ...... 

New England Deaconess Association (Attle- 
boro Springs) ......" 

Auburn 
Auburn District Nursing Association, Inc., The 

Skogsblomman Society, Inc. 

Avon 
Lutheran Children's Home, Inc. . 
Lutheran Orphans' Home Board, Incorporated 
The6 

Ayer 
Community Memorial Hospital (22 beds) 
Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women 
Inc., The ..... 



Barnstable 
Cape Cod Hospital (38 beds) 
District Nursing Association of Barnstable 

Yarmouth and Dennis, The 
Hyannis Normal Students Permanent Loan 

Fund Company, The 



Stetson Home 



Barre 



Belmont 
Belmont Community Nursing Association 



$1,257 46 



81,294 69 

5,481 46 

11,496 52 



16,007 40 
79,396 33 



118,712 21 



6,578 62 
123,153 34 



147 75 
117,568 00 
219,436 35 

1,112 56 
150.225 48 



242 61 

747,086 23 
17,305 40 



111,881 22 

1,911 61 

27,111 61 

300,000 00 

1,176 91 
3,547 69 

94,473 09 



66,818 96 
23,867 06 

220,318 16 

1,013 89 

13,023 48 

294,467 06 

9,020 37 



$46,959 00 



22,000 00 
25,000 00 



7,000 00 



4,000 00 
120,000 00 



500 00 

16,268 82 



19,000 00 
5,000 00 



$667 03 



60 



346 35 
85 75 



1,494 54 
276 50 



3,397 14 
102 00 



5,315 75 
8.127 37 



1,000 00 
9,697 63 



45,383 39 


6,466 58 
4,453 07 


11,235 36 


7,652 11 


1,112 25 


293 00 


842 55 


130 62 


7,847 05 


17,163 38 


1,042 94 


33,976 98 


5,606 06 


1,281 31 | 



None. 



1 No Report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations. 



69 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$500 00 < 
500 00 



400 00 « 



10,504 45 



500 00 



1,500 00 



3,000 00' 
200 00 



$1,986 95 



49.057 05 



3,353 52 

1,746 22 

592 09 



1,494 54 
3,536 11 



5,365 68 



4,406 28 
16,270 38 



5,304 00 

10,248 58 
21,324 73 
107.014 26 



1.000 00 
17,350 95 


45,974 90 


87,297 14 
5,779 00 


24,619 66 


8,055 49 


4,630 92 


41,109 25 


2,100 90 


829 37 


11,815 96 


20,687 27 


13,597 79 


82,588 99 


7,923 80 


675 99 


16,186 88 


4,547 19 



$1,669 95 



40,457 90 



4,424 57 

fi,114 76 

572 02 



1,597 54 
4,265 32 



5,193 30 



5,435 31 
6,181 74 



5,372 14 

9,803 95 
21,051 05 
108,859 79 



16,281 07 

45,964 10 

88,828 95 
5.768 52 



24,407 10 
8,353 32 
4,959 16 

60,502 48 

1,893 11 
508 61 

10,530 96 



22,746 81 
9,751 60 

64,237 36 

7,973 15 

300 00 

17,213 02 

4,562 81 



$702 92 



5,641 75 



170 00 
1,467 86 



910 75 
1,360 00 



3,777 67 
2,348 55 



4,923 40 

6,624 88 

3,461 25 

23,675 14 



9,383 84 



2,664 40 

43,295 86 
3,071 56 



13,028 40 
2,761 65 
2,735 30 

14,957 95 

865 80 

98 76 

3,472 00 



9,196 25 
3,264 81 

27,316 02 
5,790 00 

6.812 84 
3,835 54 



4 
239 



1,106 



37 

2,467 



92 



1,520 
521 



21 
1,110 



11 

771 

12 



467 
28 

961 

512 
3 

30 

2- 
510 



23 



L03 



2 

If,'.) 
3 

30 

13 



Restricted to capital. 



1 Paid officers. 



6 Name changed to Lutheran Children's Home, Inc. 



70 



P. D. 17. f 
Abstracts of Reports of Private I 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Berlin 

Elizabeth Rector Harper Bungalow for Desti- 
tute Children, Incorporated, The 

Beverly 

2 Beverly Female Charitable Society, The 6 

3 Beverly Fuel Society .... 

4 Beverly Hospital Corporation (115 beds) 

5 Beverly School for the Deaf 
Country Week Association . 

Essex County Health Association, Inc. 

Fisher Charitable Society . 
Old Ladies Home Society 

10 ! Vatoussian Educational Society, Inc. l . 

11 Young Men's Christian Association of Beverly 
Mass., The ...... 

Billerica 

12 Pines Community Association, The 

Boston 

Abraham Lincoln Post, Veterans of the World 
War 

14 Academy of Medicine, Inc. . 

15 A. C. Ratshesky Charity Foundation . 

16 Adams Nervine Asylum (36 beds) 

17 Agoos Family Charity Fund 

18 Alumni Mutual Fund of Boston University 

School of Theology, Inc., The . 

19 American Humane Education Society, The 

20 American Invalid Aid Society x 

21 American Unitarian Association . 

22 American Women's Overseas League of New 

England, Inc. .... 

23 Animal Rescue League of Boston 

24 Army and Navy Service Committee, Inc. 

25 Association for Independent Co-operative Liv 

ing ...... 

26 Association for the Work of Mercy in the Dio 

cese of Massachusetts, The 

27 Association of Andranovites Saint Nicholas 

Inc 

28 Association of the Evangelical Lutheran 

Church for Works of Mercy, The 

29 Auxiliary Relief Branch of the Russian and 

Polish Jewish Central Committee at Jeru- 
salem ...... 

30 Baby Hygiene Association . 

31 Baikar Association Inc. 

32 Beacon Hill Community Centre, Inc., The 

33 Belgian Netherland American Social and 

Benevolent Club Inc. 

34 Beneficent Society of the New England Con 

servatory of Music, The . 

35 Benoth Israel Sheltering Home 

36 Berkeley Infirmary, The l . 

37 Bethany Union for Young Women, The 

38 Beth El Free Loan Society of Dorchester, Inc 

The 

39 Bethesda Society .... 

40 Beth Israel Hospital Association (190 beds) 

41 Board of Ministerial Aid, The 

42 Boston Baptist Bethel City Mission Society 

43 Boston Baptist Social Union 

44 Boston Branch, Baron de Hirsch Fund 

45 Boston Branch of the Christian and Mission 

ary Alliance, Inc. .... 



$27,537 99 

1,121,800 64 

189,383 15 

69 06 

403 61 

66,695 34 
204,538 96 



225,388 50 
3,406 65 

21,733 71 

713,628 63 

1,031,487 44 
142,185 94 

16.196 59 
265,721 90 

8,206,325 65 

88 02 

1,118,870 86 

43,806 35 

48,084 90 

106,880 36 

104,882 80 



153 09 

101,830 50 
27,135 41 
60,635 49 

5,722 67 

20,508 20 
55,023 44 

68,741 12 

988 76 

152,211 52 

2,786,164 65 

94,054 89 

280,703 82 

1,401,793 27 
7,479 09 

78,392 47 



$48,300 00 
75 00 

6,900 00 



13,000 00 
31,000 00 



4,000 00 
15,000 00 



28,000 00 



"00,000 00 

72,250 00 
60,000 00 

8,000 00 



$903 60 



377,017 43 
2,836 65 
4,350 00 

100 00 



793 14 

13,468 39 
111 18 

2,034 50 
709 31 

750 00 

610 00 
1,546 00 

83,622 36 

648 88 

23,601 78 

6,259 68 

1,500 00 

15,577 20 

166 00 

5,850 84 

7,359 33 



7,740 83 
1,608 34 

401 20 

385 00 
1,449 40 

1,176 09 

511 55 

6,254 00 

429,059 16 

27,783 78 

43,755 72 



30,055 92 



None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



71 



Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 
and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$5,000 00 
6,948 02 « 



2,000 00 4 
1,000 00 



2,746 01 



/ 63,776 26* 
1 167,587 "~ 



49.839 94 
15,075 00 



500 00 4 



1,301 46 
100 00 



15.700 87 



2,100 00 
100 00 



141 87 
3,784 52 



$903 60 



1,887 58 

458,473 87 

36,574 23 

4,534 99 

6,218 26 

3,904 48 
13,119 77 



28,512 04 



1,719 05 



5,063 40 

14,463 24 

75,389 64 
8,430 01 

7,021 45 
21,235 05 



604,782 00 

650 28 

139,529 03 

27,892 51 

18,780 43 

19,889 72 

172 26 

8,704 82 



7,359 33 

21,305 74 
41,283 80 
12,361 41 

614 51 

1,485 47 
1,449 40 

20,294 90 

14,893 39 

25,943 81 

700,820 89 

32,544 97 

53,590 99 

32,137 15 
290 56 

37,021 73 



$903 



1,464 80 

166,640 93 

42,009 21 

4,744 05 

6,221 32 

3,790 77 
8,816 88 



31,098 41 



1,621 00 



4,088 71 

138,894 23 

70,904 67 
6,158 34 

6,275 27 
22,025 31 

426,160 91 

758 72 

106,142 09 

15,434 24 

16,596 06 

22,301 96 

36 30 

9,895 44 

7,589 79 

5,637 21 
40,189 22 
12,052 03 

450 25 

1,504 40 
1,454 41 

19,482 91 

15,686 40 

27,429 24 

944,286 59 

33,036 23 

51,738 32 

37.719 43 

7 50 

38,352 87 



- 




- 


$65 00 

65,201 75 

22,975 77 

1,777 97 


{ 


2 5 

69 
25 
10 


3,629 28 


( 


1« 

2 


300 00 


\ 


1 


3.003 16 


i 


5 


17,126 28 




12 


" 110 00 




1 


1,000 08 




1 


36,141 81 




50 


13,653 32 




11 


43,373 43 


{ 


3> 
36 


59,491 14 
7,317 65 


{ 


15 

42 
6 


4,302 39 




6 


6,881 50 




7 


3,326 00 




7 


3,810 38 


{ 


3 


21,752 77 
5,083 08 




12 
10 


6,064 78 




7 


13,092 68 
311,494 47 




10 

221 


36,511 92 




27 


23.877 95 


{ 


3 5 
25 


7,418 51 




11 



58 

,428 

70 

200 



431 



175 

50 2 



175 
532 



107 



1622 

342 

3 2 



34, 



127 
208 



2S 



si 



55 

164 

100 

11,336 

106 

62 

_3 

1,362 



77 



58 

124 

70 

200 



18 

107 



30,989 
60 
168 

16 



L64 
I 



1.300 



* Restricted to capital. 



1 Paid officers. 



8 Report not due. 



72 










P. D. 17. 






Abstracts of Reports of Private 






Total 


Incum- 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 






Property 
reported 


brances on 
Real Estate 


and 
Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










i 


Boston Children's Aid Society 


$890,738 20 


- 


$43,439 74 


$31,495 27 


2 


Boston Children's Friend Society 


414,169 23 


- 


19.875 87 


22,523 14 


3 


Boston City Hospital, The (1,531 beds) 


10,309,648 46 


- 


2,960,036 76 


215,310 12 


4 


Boston Dispensary, The (35 beds) 


765,634 42 


_3 


86,228 42 


126,894 14 


5 


Boston Educational Association for Deaf Chil- 












dren ....... 


3,148 44 


- 


600 00 


— 


6 


Boston Episcopal Charitable Society, The 


184,198 94 


- 


1,435 00 


150 00 


7 


Boston Fatherless and Widows' Society 


239,573 99 


- 


486 00 


- 


8 


Boston Floating Hospital, The 


867,080 13 


- 


101,215 34 


- 


9 


Boston Health League, Incorporated 


2,831 94 


~ 


3,617 00 


- 


10 


Boston Home for Incurables, The 


1,606,587 27 


" 


2,455 00 


11,888 71 


11 


Boston Hungarian Rifke Benais Jerusalem, Inc. 


120 48 


- 


61 50 


90 97 1 


12 


Boston Industrial Home .... 


90,094 95 


4,500 00 


9,415 39 


7,088 94 


13 


Boston Ladies Bethel Society 


543 78 


- 


121 97 


- 


14 


Boston Leather Trade Benevolent Society 


114,971 24 


- 


3,244 40 


- 


15 


Boston Legal Aid Society, The 


74,181 41 


- 


28,088 27 


14,511 29 


16 


Boston Lying-in Hospital (100 beds) . 


3,493,819 03 


- 


27.397 01 


153,039 78 


17 


Boston Marine Society, The 


397,469 64 


- 


8,548 00 


279 00 j 


18 


Boston Music School Settlement, Inc., The . 


10,476 64 


1,000 00 


4,746 60 


9,295 91 I 


19 


Boston National Elks 1924 Convention Asso- 










20 


ciation > ...... 

Boston Nursery for Blind Babies . 


551,230 33 


- 


325 00 


1,050 63 


21 


Boston Pilots' Relief Society 


292,532 11 


- 


3,610 00 


10,637 81 


22 


Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society, Mana- 
gers of . 


645,297 44 


- 


3.100 00 


9,865 68 


23 


Boston Provident Association 


530,101 65 


- 


42,075 92 


8,372 57 


24 


Boston Public School Teachers' Retirement 












Fund ....... 


1,255,253 87 


— 


— 


64,817 00 


25 


Boston School of Occupational Therapy, Inc. 


18,991 71 


- 


2,197 50 


17,932 36 


26 


Boston Seaman's Friend Society (Incorporated'' 


367,404 48 


- 


25,813 20 


4,113 89 


27 


Boston Section Council of Jewish Women 


838 46 


- 


4,670 95 


1,966 86 


28 


Boston Society for the Care of Girls, The 


526,026 00 


~ 


14,564 92 


5,232 32 


29 


Boston Society of Optometrists, Incorporated 


1,392 78 


" 


825 00 


~ 


30 


Boston Tuberculosis Association . 


215,754 92 


7,500 00 


16,442 56 


29,870 70 


31 


Boston United Moath Chitim Association, The 


151 72 


- 


2,800 00 


63 00 


32 


Boston Urban League, Inc. 


773 14 


_ 


8,175 94 


- 


33 


Boston Veteran Journalists' Benevolent Asso- 
ciation, Inc. ...... 


3,195 84 


- 


1,486 75 


_ 


34 


Boston Wesleyan Association 


475,314 35 


- 


- 


39,286 27 


35 


Boston Young Men's Christian Association . 


2,474,193 22 


44,190 00 


140,469 09 


1,257,592 74 


36 


Boston Young Men's Christian Union . 


1,770,292 11 


- 


31,402 99 


30,004 87 


37 


Boston Young Women's Christian Association 


2,657,387 16 


624,000 00 


82,245 47 


420,956 02 


38 


Boston Zezmer Association Inc. . 


1,627 24 


- 


412 39 


1,271 20 


39 


Boys Club of Boston Inc., The 


1,022,568 81 


- 


34,189 33 


7,353 33 


4(1 


Brackett Charitable Trust, Incorporated, The 


2,254 07 


— 


- 


- 


41 


Brigham Hospital (not in operation) 


1,087 86 


— 


~ 


- 


42 


British Charitable Society 6 


65,258 64 


- 


1,945 69 


- 


43 


Brooke House ...... 


186,751 61 


- 


- 


19,816 33 


44 


Burnap Free Home for Aged Women 7 . 


340,926 55 


- 


- 


1,718 00 


45 


Burrage Hospital Association (not in operation) 


111,581 87 


— 


- 


407 63 


46 


Calvary Rescue Mission, Inc. 


985 19 


— 


2,599 12 


- 


47 


Cape Cod Association .... 


25,326 81 


- 


- 


- 


48 


Carney Hospital (210 beds) 


278,178 19 


92,700 00 


7,096 60 


203,760 24 


4<; 


Carney Hospital Nurses' Alumnae, Inc. 


6,812 34 


- 


- 


- 


50 


Catholic Foreign Mission Society of America, 














~ 


~ 







None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



s Not stated. 



* Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



73 



Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
: Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$57,726 38 


/ $15,840 64' 
\ 52,260 31 


} $184,921 70 


$135,775 13 


_ 




_ 




_8 




_8 


_8 


1 


17,900 44 


21,250 00 


81.670 90 


59.107 31 


$17,177 20 




12 


{ 


42 
368 


} 


109 


- 


2 


2,711 14 


- 


3,178,058 02 


3,028,296 59 


1,348,841 84 




1,279 


146,565 


131,854 


- 


3 


20,203 91 


/ 50,315 79 4 
1 5,500 00 


} 239,371 01 


262,878 06 


189,504 96 




156 




26,216 




7,082 


~ 


4 


210 00 

9,567 97 

16,656 35 

39,840 92 


— 


810 00 
11,002 97 
17,142 35 
41,530 85 


733 14 
9,647 75 
15,316 52 
20.141 90 


733 14 

180 00 

9,342 80 




_3 
1 

2 




90 
66 

-3 

93 




90 
66 

_3 

93 


: 


5 
6 

7 

8 


67 75 


- 


3,684 75 


5,875 50 


4,099 92 




2 


{ 


322 

-3 


} 


-3 


- 


9 


59,614 92 


/ 3,000 00^ 
\ 20,660 70 


1 93,019 33 
154 11 


64,388 43 


32,028 19 




36 




65 


27 


- 


10 


1 64 




123 65 


- 




- 




— 3 




_3 


_3 


11 


2,217 61 


- 


18,721 94 


18,725 36 


6,134 12 


{ 


25 

15 




52 

4,114 


j 


1.004 


9 


12 


15 84 


250 00 


387 81 


41 96 


- 




- 


! 


1« 

_3 


j 


-3 


- 


13 


5,204 77 


5,000 00 4 


8,449 17 


7,466 45 


410 00 


/ 
1 


is 
1 


} 


13 




— 3 


- 


14 


30,800 18 


- 


73,399 74 


46,203 35 


32,561 50 




22 


! 


82 

8,953 


I 
j 


5,603 


_3 


15 


30,405 80 


- 


211,566 25 


211,408 50 


68,768 07 




93 


8,215 


102 


- 


16 


20,961 59 


649 38 * 


29,788 59 


30,318 56 


3,983 28 


{ 


25 


} 


97 




_ 


_ 


17 


65 75 


- 


14,108 26 


15,369 60 


12,037 30 


21 


345 




57 


- 


18 


26,650 40 


57,109 67 « 


28,026 03 


21,109 70 


10,602 66 




11 




39 




31 


_ 


19 

20 


18,428 34 


- 


32,676 15 


24,555 31 


300 00 


{ 


25 


} 


17 




- 


- 


21 


30,472 12 


- 


43,437 80 


26.399 30 


12,533 96 


{ 


25 

12 


} 


10,592 




2,126 


6 


22 


31.572 95 


- 


82,021 44 


84,811 56 


21,264 47 


8 


1,142 




_ 3 


1,334 


23 


52,994 35 


- 


117,811 35 


135,273 37 


930 00 


{ 


25 

1 


} 


_3 




_3 


- 


24 


- 


- 


20,129 86 


20,032 50 


13,790 51 




10 


! 


72 
78 


! 


25 


_ 


25 


17,948 58 

70 77 

30,808 09 

27 27 


/ 5,000 00 4 
I 4,075 00 

23 03 


J 51,225 67 

6,708 58 

50,628 36 

852 27 


42,980 83 

7,299 96 

57,725 06 

639 95 


23,618 00 


{ 


15 

19 


_3 
_8 


_3 

_8 


_3 

_3 

_8 


26 

27 
28 
29 


4,712 26 


- 


47,886 76 


55,411 05 


30,798 85 




24 


{ 


3 2 
2,043 


} 


2,042 


15 


30 


3 90 


— 


2,863 00 
8,179 84 


2,711 28 
7,991 94 


87 76 
4,018 00 




3 


1,500 

_3 


1,500 

_3 


_ 3 
_3 


31 
32 


53 27 

47,858 18 


_ 


1,540 02 
87,144 45 


265 45 
92,392 60 


41,121 01 




14 




2 

_3 




_3 
_3 


_3 


33 

34 


18,556 94 


16,400 OO 4 


1,416,618 77 


1,416,219 70 


269,212 15 


{ 


15 

433 


! 


25,274 




7,213 


- 


35 


47,297 14 
20,397 63 


/ 13,450 OO 4 
1 8,748 97 
60,646 46 4 


} 117,453 97 
482,758 30 


133,233 45 
593,185 52 


53,254 77 
297,986 21 


52 
250 


1262 
6,345 

_3 


} 


2,934 

_3 


" 


36 
37 


- 


- 


1,683 59 


706 67 


- 




- 


{ 


I 2 


} 


- 


-3 


38 


6,256 88 

200 38 

24 00 


6,500 00 


54,299 54 

200 38 

24 00 


114,906 25 


63,629 24 




70 


9,531 


9,531 


- 


39 

40 

-11 


4,835 64 


9,190 00 * 


6,781 33 


6,364 22 


641 69 


{ 


15 


} 


171 




171 


292 


42 


5,450 13 


3,000 00 


28,266 46 


23,335 77 


9,471 48 




15 


{ 


12 

315 


i 


70 


1 


43 


13,446 04 

2,096 91 

95 36 


11,673 02 4 


15,164 04 
2,504 54 
2,694 48 


12,736 84 
4,870 13 
2,464 32 


4,772 52 

1,200 00 

400 00 




6 

_j 
1 


19 
3,000 


19 
3,000 


16 


44 
45 
46 


1,275 70 


- 


1,275 70 


1,232 50 


100 00 


{ 


15 


} 


5 




5 


- 


47 


174 17 


19,323 41 


230,885 77 


201,240 92 


67,119 91 


102 


17,831 




296 


- 


48 


- 


- 


478 75 


470 05 


- 




- 


{ 


22 

14 


1 


14 


- 


4'.! 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 




_ 




_ 


_ 


60 



Paid officers. 6 Report for 14 months. 7 Report for 1 1 months. 8 Reported under Children's Aid Association 



74 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 


Boston — Con. 
Channing Home, in Boston 
Charitable Burial Association l 


$305,402 75 


- 


$875 00 


$7,263 98 


3 


Charitable Irish Society, The 


18,091 22 


- 


6,001 45 


1,619 63 


4 


Charitable Surgical Appliance Shop 


56,532 14 


- 


- 


37,980 58 


5 


Charity of Edward Hopkins, Trustees of the 


79,739 28 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Charles Irwin Travelli Fund, The 


2,729 59 


- 


62,000 00 


- 


7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

14 
15 


Charlestown Charity Fund, Trustees of the 
Charlestown Poor's Fund, Trustees of the * . 
Charlotte Cushman Club of Boston, The 
Children's Aid Association (Unincorporated) 
Children's Hospital, The (225 beds) 
Children's Mission to Children, The 
Chinese Mission of New England Auxiliary to 

the American Sunday School Union 6 
Christopher Shop, Inc., The l 
Church Home Society for the Care of Children 

of the Protestant Episcopal Church, The . 


6,972 49 

59,792 33 

4,915 57 

4,924,640 84 

994,880 70 

1,035 63 
312,400 63 


41,000 00 
40,000 00 


3,220 11 

220,421 56 

58,808 95 

21,370 25 

6,614 00 
44,319 56 


8,747 91 

274,989 10 
8,927 38 

20,464 14 


16 


Citizens' Committee on Conservation, Inc. 1 . 










17 


City Missionary Society .... 


479,912 09 


- 


43,399 11 


10,755 70 


18 


Clara C. Hyams Fund, Inc. 


1,487,547 81 


- 


25,500 00 


- 


19 
20 
21 
22 

23 
24 


Columbus Day Nursery of South Boston, The 
Commonwealth Charitable Corporation 
Community Service of Boston, Inc. 
Conference of Baptist Ministers in Massachu- 
setts, The ...... 

Consumers' League of Massachusetts (Inc.) . 
Consumptives' Home, Trustees of the . 


23,163 14 

753 60 

293,278 01 

1,705 31 

67,739 81 


- 


2,148 06 

20,954 50 

2,006 53 
3,391 60 


547 17 


25 


Cooperative Workrooms, Inc. 


13,998 90 


- 


30,491 58 


35,132 37 


26 


Council for Greater Boston Camp Fire Girls 7 


61,235 79 


39,000 00 


2,536 20 


3,471 12 


27 


Craigie Foundation, The .... 


- 


- 


4,650 00 


- 


28 
29 


Daly Industrial School, The 
Deaconess' Aid Society of New England 


86,575 52 
11,242 71 


~ 


1,751 70 
1,314 05 


14,846 08 
2,239 37 


30 


Dean Foundation for Little Children, Inc. 


428,436 74 


- 


- 


- 


31 


Denison House ...... 


51,116 85 


8,000 00 


19,290 85 


1,094 32 


32 


Devens Benevolent Society 


3,058 98 


- 


- 


- 


33 


Diocesan Board of Missions 


301,641 76 


- 


10,455 64 


- 


34 


Directory, Inc., The (for Mothers' Milk) 


20,577 16 


- 


6,263 23 


28,211 33 


35 
36 
37 

38 
39 


Disabled Ex-Service Men's Exchange, Inc. 3 . 
Disabled Veterans' Hospital Service Inc. 
Dispensary for Women, Inc., The 1 
Dorchester House, Incorporated . 
Durant Incorporated, The .... 


8,087 69 

21,186 29 
1,632,980 47 


187,536 00 


15,770 33 

1,692 82 
1,008 53 


2,897 90 


40 


East Boston Free Loan Association, Inc. 


6,776 01 


- 


286 35 


15,578 77 


41 
42 

43 

44 


Eastern Missionary Association, The x . 
Eastern Star of Massachusetts Charitable 
Foundation, Inc. ..... 

Edward Hatch Memorial, Inc. 1 . 

Elizabeth Peabody House Association, The . 


236,601 91 
156,033 48 


73,875 80 


38,168 66 
25,473 07 


4,566 22 
15,730 00 


45 


Ellen M. Gifford Sheltering Home Corporation, 
The 


197,133 21 


- 


1,555 35 


- 


46 

47 
48 


Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc. 
Employees' Fund, Incorporated . 
Episcopal City Mission, The 1 


64,834 30 
92,962 64 


15,000 00 


17,676 38 


6,704 02 


49 


Evangelistic Association of New England 


10,471 61 


- 


19,247 70 


- 


50 


Faith and Hope Association, The 


13,959 50 


- 


5,138 52 


2,667 76 


51 


Family Welfare Society of Boston 


819,198 03 


- 


429,223 97 


3,752 49 


52 


Farm and Trades School, The 


664,905 10 


- 


20,696 00 


15,118 97 


53 

54 


Fathers and Mothers Club, The . 

Faulkner Hospital Corporation, The (75 beds) 


26,219 71 
1,337,072 10 


400,000 00 


467 55 
41,926 29 


1,231 66 
129,928 72 



- None. l No report. 2 Organizations aided. 3 Not stated. 4 Restricted to capital. 5 Paid officers. 



m ii. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



75 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$4,175 60 $26,562 34 

7,642 31 

40,632 59 

4,665 18 



62,219 76 
333 99 

12,299 01 
230,532 58 
445,403 30 

94,135 24 

6,619 76 



10,000 00 

201,394 76' 

18,027 53 



10,551 16 4 



22,425 07 



321,497 01* 
12.379 



100 00 4 



5.000 00 



15,795 36< 
45,250 00 
14,125 00 
401 16 4 



i.OOO 00 4 



81,165 16 

96,857 83 

70,257 41 

3,204 33 

21,523 07 

17,412 11 
3,471 12 
2,612 44 

66,091 96 
7,692 02 

4,650 00 

17,365 03 
3,992 91 

24,231 26 

20,446 56 

158 23 
22,387 23 
35,001 55 

16,120 03 

2,466 86 
4,031 39 

15,865 12 

39,488 51 
43,593 56 

9,542 85 

25,924 99 
4,321 18 

28,219 32 

7,806 28 

509,035 78 

89,981 13 

3,097 33 
174,715 64 



$24,384 53 

6,802 67 
36,037 02 
4,689 33 

64,395 05 
30 00 

12,507 26 
212.737 77 
459,528 83 

86,011 76 

6,832 52 

83,210 88 

83,842 12 

60,709 60 

3,143 61 

21,663 90 

18.900 00 
5.492 27 
4.442 94 

64,484 80 
8,682 53 

4,650 00 

17,707 57 
3,797 18 

1,369 50 

20,072 76 

288 50 
23,794 52 
25,816 92 

16,821 17 

3,402 03 
38,973 51 

15,423 51 



18,726 96 

44,547 82 

9,371 98 

26,751 70 
1,800 00 

24,254 87 
7,415 78 

285,350 01 

75,653 08 

1,994 84 
167,085 06 



$10,733 50 


1,536 50 


22,613 64 


200 00 


2,984 33 

79,895 81 

246.556 61 

26,847 54 


2,401 62 


34,294 14 


40,666 87 


146 89 


832 00 


13,438 63 


780 00 
2,991 00 


22,374 70 


2,613 75 


3,200 00 


1,808 00 


700 00 



14,544 18 



8,063 51 



1,675 70 



2,136 74 
3,393 00 



5,964 74 
22,280 76 

1,714 00 
16,913 01 

6,800 02 
1,856 85 

103,227 66 

27,572 83 

365 00 
53,865 74 



50 

283 
15 



78 

10 2 
_3 
-3 

22 

6 
2922 

4 

200 

2,246 

19,476 

583 



32 
264 



22 
611 



59 



60 



42 
282 

112 

3,200 

62 

91 

125 

15 



12 

604 

12 



9,000 
210 

17 

2,000 

5 

858 

1,500 

14 

526 

123 

100 
2,144 



1,767 

9,958 

479 



47 
235 



60 
_j 

282 
400 



89 



501) 



17 
500 



275 
14 



111 



« Name changed to Chinese Mission of New England. » Report for 6 months. » Report not due. • Animals. 



76 



P. D. 17.j 
Abstracts of Reports of Privatel 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Boston — Con. 

Federated Jewish Charities of Boston l 
First-Spiritualist-Ladies Aid Society of Bosto 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion 

Folk Handicrafts Guild 

Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children 

Fragment Society, The 

Frances E. Willard Settlement 

Frances Merry Barnard Home, Inc. 

Franklin Square House, The 

Franklin Typographical Society . 

Frederick E. Weber Charities Corporation, The 

Frederika Home, Inc. 

Freeman L. Lowell Memorial Hospital and 

Dispensary ..... 
French Benevolent and Relief Association 
French Women's Christian Association 
General Alliance of Unitarian and Other Lib- 
eral Christian Women 
German Aid Society of Boston, The 
German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston 
German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston (Alten- 

heim Fund) x . 
Girls' Friendly Society Home 
Girls' Friendly Society in the Diocese of 
Massachusetts, Inc., The 

Good Will House Association 

Good Will Industries of America, Inc. . 

Grand Masters and Wardens of the Alpha 

Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted 

Masons of Massachusetts 
Greater Boston Bikur Cholim Hospital ( 45 

beds) ...... 

Greenwood Church Community House Inc. 

Guild of St. Apollonia. Inc., The 

Guild of St. Elizabeth, The 

Hahnemann Hospital 

Hairenik Association .... 

Hale House Association 

Harriet Tubman House, Inc. 

Harry E. Burroughs Newsboys Foundation 

Inc., The 

Hebrew Free Loan Society, The . 

Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, The . 

Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association of Rox 

bury . .... 

Hebrew Ladies' Moshev Zekainim Association 
Hebrew Sheltering Home Association of Rox- 

bury ... . . 

Hebrew Women's Sewing Society 1 
Hecht Neighborhood House, Incorporated 
Helping Hand Sisters Association of East 
Boston Inc., The .... 

Helping Hand Society "Dania" . 

Holy Trinity Catholic School and Society 

Boston .... 
Home for Aged Colored Women, The . 

Home for Aged Couples 

Home for Aged Men .... 

Home for Aged Women 

Home for Destitute Catholic Children 
Home for Italian Children, Inc. . 
Home for Jewish Children . 

Home Makers Association of Massachusetts 
Household Nursing Association, The 



$480 52 
518,491 59 

4,607,989 01 

58,914 78 

307,398 79 

129,771 20 

796,278 99 
86,941 14 
743,071 53 



113,867 16 

522 37 

7,347 33 

225,714 86 
59,301 93 
29,431 92 



34,389 60 

93,351 98 
5,850 02 



18,162 51 

44,200 14 

70,656 76 

5,521 52 

13,076 22 

69,622 89 

50,234 33 

123,809 99 

14,528 65 

504,397 00 
8,240 45 

3,809 94 

22,660 81 
991,107 51 



72,795 75 

469 85 
92 36 

6 93 
287,810 42 

2,216,736 79 
1,268,627 27 

2,307,038 51 

772,637 72 
167,366 05 
123,677 31 

68 47 
88,664 99 



$65,000 00 
15,000 00 

56,500 00 



81,000 00 
1,341 56 



60,800 00 



7,000 



15,000 00 
37,000 00 



7,500 00 



4,600 00 
187,500 00 



105,000 00 



40,000 00 



38,000 00 



$269 96 
42,309 45 

61,139 13 
3,538 00 
37,510 98 

750 00 



670 00 



4,143 00 

946 50 

48,892 26 
421 50 
385 00 

3,850 46 

5,603 55 
6,514 35 



451 96 

35,692 34 
1,249 42 
6,038 63 
1,584 00 

11,731 45 

11,352 90 

455 00 

3,501 00 
11,515 65 

15,400 04 

2,074 19 
85,700 47 



55 64 

272 32 
51 80 

837 24 
2,105 00 

62 00 
500 00 

7,532 50 

17,581 32 
26,643 84 
45,617 00 

1,213 00 
7,883 00 



None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



« Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



77 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$19 56 




$410 27 


$345 11 








5 


_3 


_3 


1 

2 


10,381 74 


f $4,332 27 4 
\ 9,948 03 

1,000 00 
1,544 84 


J 74,195 02 


67,333 31 


$34,371 02 


25 


{ 


42 - 
1,289 


J 1,076 


- 


3 


118 56 

132,855 14 

2,887 96 

2,895 01 


18,661 73 

171,152 18 

7,425 96 

96,844 68 


19,324 65 

160,040 48 

6,773 60 

91,889 24 


14,619 08 
100,114 28 

34,001 84 


100 

87 

52 


_3 

9,202 
800 
668 


_3 

47 

_ 3 

6 


— 3 
_3 


4 
5 
6 
7 


5,005 91 


3,311 18 


25,512 60 


11,150 21 


4,967 43 


/ I s 

I 5 


} 


7 


_3 


~ 


8 


14,263 93 


7,256 32i 


363,536 87 


353,003 19 


165,093 35 


J 15 

\ 175 


j 


6,504 


_3 


- 


9 


4,591 39 


600 00 4 


8,333 14 


7,666 90 


75 00 


35 




47 


20 


10 


10 


38,911 60 


_ 


39,249 49 


42,853 55 


3,850 00 


35 


{ 


6 2 
115 


} .. 


80 


11 

12 


2,704 62 
9 92 


: 


10,209 02 

9 92 

2,900 40 


8,408 90 
2,482 67 


3,602 80 
896 34 


4 
2 




4,521 

_3 


2,516 


-3 


13 
14 
15 


10,229 17 
3,800 83 
1,748 84 


200 00 ^ 


58,648 87 
4,222 33 
2,135 64 


56,996 10 
3,447 55 
1,143 47 


8,700 00 

840 00 

90 00 


4 
1 

_ 3 




_3 
_3 
15 


_3 
_3 


_3 
_3 


16 

17 
18 


757 81 


500 00 


9,225 91 


8,972 66 


3,646 04 


12 




443 


- 


- 


19 
20 


418 86 


500 00 


34,061 16 


31,744 45 


8,599 41 


5 


{ 


42 

4,327 


1 
/ 

175 


- 


21 


314 68 


- 


6,829 03 


6,892 72 


4,162 50 


4 


175 


245 


22 
23 


2,668 05 


- 


3,120 01 


2,048 50 


1,225 00 


1 




_3 


_3 


_ 3 


24 


56 15 

41 31 

49 52 
3,608 70 

7,255 26 


200 67 
6,000 00 


34,760 04 
7,455 51 

10,489 17 
6,157 97 
3.608 70 

72,408 60 

29,135 23 
3,025 85 


31,284 72 
8,163 16 

12,651 07 

5,539 29 

431 44 

72,546 39 

17,902 62 
4,917 27 


14,069 61 
1,083 45 
2,939 55 
3,020 00 

7,707 00 

8,229 50 

624 00 


58 
3 
2 
4 

15 

7 

_3 




81 

16,000 
93 

_ 3 

325 
235 


26 

16,000 
18 

_ 3 

60 


57 

_3 
_3 


25 
26 

.'7 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 


50 00 


- 


5,379 12 


46,805 32 


18,333 73 


35 




_3 


_3 


_ 


33 


167 95 


348 00 


259,921 86 


267,861 26 


8,386 06 


f 15 

i i- 

I 3 


} 


1,655 


-3 


- 


34 


89 39 


50 00 


15,539 43 


10,146 95 


5,599 88 


i 


_3 


_3 


_3 


35 


309 38 
2,044 68 


- 


34,103 48 
114,532 95 


33,269 23 
104,639 00 


1,154 13 
29,581 39 


2 

41 




424 

265 


424 
265 


_ 


36 
37 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




50 


50 


- 


38 

39 
40 


1,505 45 


- 


18,434 42 


20,298 40 


16,589 21 


14 




- 


_ 


- 


24 09 
4 00 


- 


707 74 
193 75 


763 80 
186 93 


5 00 


15 


I 


2'2 

20 

8 


} 20 
8 


5 

8 


41 
12 


14,219 66 


7,881 26 


5,108 24 
24,469 74 


5,557 30 
14,303 01 


1,656 00 
4,080 10 


4 
6 




35 

79 


3 
79 


- 


43 

11 


97,459 92 


68,056 83^ 


134,776 62 


71,410 72 


24,079 74 


f 25 

1 23 




98 


- 3 


- 


45 


65,122 86 


- 


67,007 16 


61,794 95 


22,037 89 


/ I 5 
\ 23 
1 25 
I 33 

18 
6 

22 




12 

130 


} 130 


- 


46 


83,625 84 

30,178 33 
481 03 
914 61 


25,165 74 
45,249 12 

4,333 33 


123,531 89 

93,008 77 
30,079 37 

51,654 88 


93,854 23 

55,638 76 
18,655 53 
49,508 79 


25,963 96 

15,998 70 

3,090 00 

20,532 25 


} 


244 

2,621 
64 
110 


2,621 
16 

110 


- 


47 

48 
19 
50 


- 


- 


1,213 00 


1,402 20 


- 


- 




2 2 
120 


} 120 


115 


51 


2,425 13 


1,400 00 


31,372 41 


30,254 29 


6,185 92 


18 


I 


12 

2,638 


J 101 


- 


52 



1 Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



78 










P. D. 17 




Abstracts of Reports of PrivaU 






Total 
Property 


Incum- 
brances on 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 
and 






reported 


Real Estate 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










i 


House of the Angel Guardian, Trustees of the 


$410,303 01 


- 


$25,471 93 


$77,460 95 


2 


House of Good Samaritan (75 beds) 


914,659 97 


— 


27,353 73 


10,872 35 


3 


House of the Good Shepherd 


472,280 39 


- 


13,017 15 


97,438 99 


4 


Howard Benevolent Society 


589,681 28 


- 


50 00 


- 


5 


Humane Society of the Commonwealth of 












Massachusetts, The . ... 


353,022 79 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Hunt Asylum for Destitute Children 


57,407 62 


- 


100 00 


- 


7 


Huntington Institute for Orphan Children, The 


231,242 92 


- 


- 


_ 


8 


Immigrants Home, East Boston, The 


45,070 62 


- 


1,519 13 


191 77 1 


9 


Industrial Aid Society .... 


69,452 54 


- 


11,829 50 


- 


10 


Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed 












Children, The ..... 


1,896,726 05 


- 


8,736 34 


72 93 J 


11 


Industrial School for Girls .... 


181,731 90 


- 


150 00 


1,684 15 1 


12 


Infants Hospital (50 beds) 


902,884 38 


- 


33,966 75 


- 


13 


Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor, The 


111,486 00 


- 


17,441 00 


— 


14 


Instructive District Nursing Association 


622,485 10 


- 


- 


_ 


15 


Isaac Alberts Memorial Aid Association 


90 09 


- 


487 00 


_ 


L6 


Jacoby Club of Boston, The 


5,993 10 


— 


3,893 00 


_ 


17 


Jamaica Plain Community Conference, The . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


IS 


Jamaica Plain Dispensary .... 


57,042 34 


- 


- 


193 70 I 


19 


Jamaica Plain Neighborhood House Association 


27,288 29 


~ 


4,228 00 


2,199 27 1 


20 


Jewish Anti-Tuberculosis Association 


9,028 62 


- 


2,592 00 


5,301 54 J 


21 


Jewish Big Brother Association of Boston 


- 


- 


5,731 07 


- 


22 


Jewish Children's Aid Society of Boston 


2,478 89 


- 


2,214 40 


302 27 


23 


Jewish Children's Bureau of Boston, Inc. 


- 


- 


30,063 92 


15,060 58 


24 


Jewish Maternity Clinic Association 


3,896 74 


$2,750 00 


2,483 10 


498 10 


25 


Jewish Tuberculosis Sanatorium of Massa- 












chusetts ...... 


11,658 86 


- 


2,730 06 


2,741 28 


26 


John Boylston's Charitable Donations for the 
Benefit and Support of aged poor Persons, 
and of Orphans and deserted Children, 
Trustees of l . 










27 


John H. Storer Student Loan Fund, Incor- 












porated ...... 


4,526 22 


- 


- 


- 


28 


John Howard Industrial Home, The 


130,908 60 


— 


275 00 


_ 


2fl 


Joseph Herman Trust Fund, Inc., The 


11,743 19 


- 


- 


- 


30 


Judge Baker Foundation .... 


119,640 94 


- 


59,685 56 


206 00 


31 


Junior League of Boston, Inc., The 


32,127 50 


- 


39,342 26 


6,815 16 


32 


Keith Fund, Inc. ..... 


1,289,007 59 


- 


- 


- 


33 


Kfar De' ian Society, Inc. .... 


255 00 


- 


40 50 


_ 


34 


Knights of Pythias of North America, South 
America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Aus- 












tralia, Benefit Association 


71,879 09 


20,000 00 


- 


5,624 43 


35 


Ladies Auxiliary to Company L, Sixth Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts National Guard (In- 












corporated), The ..... 


9 65 


- 


195 43 


- 


36 


Ladies Benevolent Circle of Clarendon Street 












Baptist Church ..... 


11,408 41 


- 


14 50 


- 


37 


Ladies Helping Hand Auxiliary to the Home 












for Destitute Jewish Children, The . 


30,836 34 


5,000 02 


15,184 36 


1,740 67 


38 


Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts 


48 93 


- 


160 00 


2,216 65 


39 


Ladies' Lyceum Union l .... 










40 


Ladies' Unity Club ..... 


95,981 78 


- 


6,436 23 


1,000 00 


41 


Lawrence Avenue Free Loan Association 


3,681 05 


- 


328 75 


- 


42 


League of Women for Community Service 


11,846 64 


2,000 00 


2,346 40 


640 32 


43 


Lend a Hand Society ..... 


106,818 65 


- 


7,697 47 


100 35 


44 


Leopold Morse Home for Infirm Hebrews and 












Orphanage, The ..... 


94,516 77 


- 


- 


- 


4. : , 


Lincoln House Association .... 


363,787 98 


- 


21,317 10 


1,222 59 


46 


Little House, Inc., The .... 


7,915 52 


- 


4,418 00 


2,329 51 


17 


Lord's Day League of New England 


154,888 76 


- 


6.855 48 


- 


48 


Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will 












of (Lotta Educational Fund) 


25,256 29 









None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



79 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 

Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$879 18 

38,237 03 

57 50 

31,845 30 

20,775 38 

3,392 02 

13,350 08 

42 00 

4,399 97 

71,191 92 
12,380 74 
33,333 05 
112 00 
29,941 14 

642 50 

2,782 58 
228 27 

232 62 



23 89 
2 51 
7 69 

327 63 



234 64 

13,237 54 

455 27 

2,773 51 

311 97 
213,385 44 



231 48 



478 51 
172 47 

3,774 94 

1,855 60 
5,795 63 

5,662 96 

19,688 83 
169 01 

10,575 20 
272 64 



$49,680 36 
10,463 53 « 
9,080 00 

100 00 



81,112 71 

45,100 67 « 
21,498 00 
35,085 42 



2,000 00 



1,400 00 
2,000 00 



2,539 41 



,250 00 



1,000 00 



$153,492 42 
63,536 45 
119,593 64 

31,995 30 



20,775 38 

3,492 02 

13,350 08 

1,752 90 

16,229 47 

161,113 90 
14,214 89 
66,299 80 
39,051 00 
65,026 56 
487 00 
4,535 50 

2,976 28 
8,655 54 

8,137 16 

5,731 07 

2,640 62 
45,127 01 

2,988 89 

5,798 97 



234 64 
14,912 54 

455 27 
64,665 07 

46,599 47 

213,385 44 
40 50 

5,855 91 



195 43 



493 01 



15,406 50 
2,376 65 



13,750 58 
328 75 



21,843 45 

5,662 96 

42,228 52 
7,919 52 

17,430 68 
272 64 



$81,160 57 
71,380 33 
111,599 48 

32,103 17 

20,643 02 

2,462 50 

13,273 60 

1,271 17 

16,332 35 

78,204 62 
14,436 61 
68,614 96 
44,267 00 
30,372 97 
525 00 
4,614 30 

1,117 05 
6,395 60 

7,335 00 

5,731 07 

2,102 55 
43,481 03 
2,979 39 

762 63 



6,330 00 

35,859 39 
20,090 68 

145,156 07 

7,406 21 

207 53 

897 69 

15,412 52 
2,388 35 

5,067 90 
75 00 

4,961 36 

21,414 75 

4,288 00 

42,378 46 
7.156 11 

20,111 15 
16 35 



$8,744 00 
29,598 41 
22,200 35 

1,965 80 

9,275 82 
225 00 

614 39 
12,623 45 

42,334 21 
4,087 50 



2,400 00 



600 00 
4,670 02 



5,178 91 



10,187 40 
1,560 00 



2,400 00 

26,670 24 
258 40 



2,180 00 



77 00 
1,080 00 

2,458 00 
75 00 

1,364 60 
4,392 00 

100 00 

31,480 43 
5,789 09 

13,609 40 



20 

is 

1 

2 
8 

59 
6 
22 



802 
305 
834 

12 



1,685 
3,803 

167 
42 

867 
178 

13 
317 

994 
1,750 

72 

218 
100 



a? 

234 



90 



4 


f 


252 


\ 


17,225 


3 


J 


282 


I 


248 


1 


( 


12 
-3 


26 




800 


5 




_ 


15 

5 


} 


- 






-3 



302 

828 



7 
40 

1,628 
3,803 

167 
27 
18 

178 

13 
317 

994 
1,370 



218 
100 



37 

234 



875 
240 



780 



125 



34 



35 



4 Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



- 


40 

•41 


no 


42 


4 


43 


-3 


44 


-3 


45 
4<i 


- 


47 


_3 


48 



80 










p. d. 17.; 




Abstracts of Reports of Private 




Total 
Property 


Incum- 
brances on 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 
and 






reported 


Real Estate 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will 
of (Lotta Fund for Aiding Discharged Con- 












victs) ....... 


$100,673 78 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 












(Lotta Hospital Fund) 


50,674 83 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 












(Lotta Theatrical Fund) .... 


100,041 65 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 












(Mary A. Crabtree Fund) 


99,407 50 


_ 


- 


_ 


5 


Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of 












(World War Fund) 


2,019,588 84 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6 


Lucy Stone Home, The .... 


10,602 63 


_ 


$694 84 


_ 


7 


Lucy Wheelock Kindergarten Alumnae Asso- 












ciation, Incorporated, The 


21,511 52 


- 


1,238 00 


$860 10 ; 


8 


Lutheran Board of Missions, Inc. 


7,481 65 


- 


14,821 88 


" 


9 


Lutheran Immigrant Board, Boston, Massa- 












chusetts, Inc., The ..... 


27,372 56 


_ 


3,094 62 


4,973 25 


10 


Marie Dewing Faelten Charitable Association, 








1 




Inc. .... . 


19,977 45 


_ 


655 00 


26 25 | 


11 


Masonic Education and Charity Trust 6 


1,612,232 53 


_ 


- 


- 


12 


Massachusetts Anti-Saloon League, Inc., The 


757 87 


_ 


- 


— 


13 


Massachusetts Association for Occupational 












Therapy, Inc. . . . . 


411 97 


_ 


1,287 75 




14 


Massachusetts Association for Promoting the 












Interests of the Adult Blind 


232,626 69 


- 


5,960 00 


6,957 14 : 


15 


Massachusetts Baptist Charitable Society 


272,275 15 


- 


3,202 15 


- 


16 


Massachusetts Baptist Convention 


1,102,007 57 


_ 


48,657 96 


- 


1 y 


Massachusetts Branch of the Shut In Society, 












Inc., The ...... 


5,686 40 


_ 


2,343 97 




18 


Massachusetts Branch of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary to the National Council of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church in the United States 












of America, The ..... 


28,576 39 


- 


1,412 12 


- 


19 


Massachusetts Catholic Woman's Guild 


1,512 33 


_ 


8,020 07 


- 


20 


Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society, The . 


59,319 86 








21 


Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society (Sum- 










mer Street Fire Fund) .... 


55,143 13 


_ 


- 


- 


22 


Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association 


668,929 03 


_ 


710 00 


_ 


23 


Massachusetts Charitable Society, The 


204,555 16 






_ 


24 


Massachusetts Child Labor Committee (In- 












corporated) ..... 


107 18 


- 


11,953 99 


65 32 


25 


Massachusetts Civic League 


395 32 


_ 


15,416 34 


3,711 71 [ 


26 


Massachusetts Congregational Charitable So- 












ciety, The ...... 


285,318 68 


- 


- 




27 


Massachusetts Congregational Conference and 












Missionary Society ..... 


1.757,551 18 


- 


97,244 17 


- 


28 


Massachusetts Department of the Ladies of 












the Grand Army of the Republic 


1,117 85 


- 


948 47 


196 82 


29 


Massachusetts Division of the International 
Sunshine Society, The l . . . 










30 


Massachusetts Elks Scholarship Foundation 












Inc 


18,220 04 


_ 


8,450 00 


- 


31 


Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (231 












beds) ....... 


1,669,840 82 


_ 


27,157 09 


356,383 80 


32 


Massachusetts General Hospital. The, Boston: 












McLean Hospital, Belmont (755 beds) 


17,762,624 39 


- 


296,101 92 


2,053,270 18 


33 


Massachusetts Girl Scouts, Incorporated 


223,579 02 


_ 


44,495 66 


83,621 88 


34 


Massachusetts Health Company, The 1 . 










35 


Massachusetts Home ..... 


90,856 36 


$9,500 00 


5,115 00 


20,912 15 


36 


Massachusetts Housing Association Incorpo- 












rated ....... 


926,568 43 


_ 


_ 


_ 


37 


Massachusetts League of Girls' Clubs, Incor- 












porated ....... 


18,914 47 


5.000 00 


4,343 00 


1,285 47 I 


38 


Massachusetts Lying-in Hospital . 










39 


Massachusetts Maternity and Foundling Hos- 












pital Corporation 


37,448 93 


_ 


_ 


_ 


10 


Massachusetts Medical Benevolent Society 


85,973 00 


- 


168 00 


" 1 



None. 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 


















81 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 










Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$8,502 56 


. 


$8,502 56 


$7,828 78* 






1 
I 


I 


- 3 


_3 


1 


717 40 


- 


717 40 


42 57 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


2 


1,385 48 


- 


1,385 48 


1,343 83 


- 


- 


10 




10 


_3 


3 


1,185 16 


$2,592 50 * 


1,185 16 


1,264 25 


- 


- 


38 




38 


_ 3 


4 


45,527 15 


- 


46,912 51 
694 84 


80,041 76 
694 84 


_ 


- 


1,535 




1,535 


~ 


5 

6 


10 09 


- 


2,108 19 


2,623 38 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


7 


216 19 


- 


15,038 07 


13,605 60 


- 


- 


/ 222 


} 


- 


- 


8 


- 


- 


8,088 20 


9,401 99 


$1,275 00 


{ r 


} 592 




440 


-3 


9 


835 99 

60,541 83 

440 47 


127 38 

48,042 43 * 


1,644 62 

60,541 83 

440 47 


895 00 

47,166 61 

383 17 


1,760 00 


1 


14 
17 




-3 


2 


10 
11 
12 


12 79 


- 


1.300 54 


1,388 66 


718 00 


15 


/ I 2 
I 140 


} 


_3 


- 


13 


8,590 22 


- 


21,507 36 


25,276 57 


5.562 29 


2 


J 22 
\ 300 


} 


100 


" 


It 


14,062 31 


50 00 


17,014 46 


16,301 00 


600 00 


/ 2> 
1 2 


} 56 




56 


- 


15 


53,745 60 


7,230 76* 


102,403 56 


105,460 42 


15,534 66 


/ 2 5 

I 10 


I -3 




_ 3 


_3 


16 


244 96 


- 


2,588 93 


2,548 80 


595 00 


1 


~ 




- 


-3 


17 


1,294 98 


/ 1,000 004 
1 15 31 


J 2,719 41 


3,591 44 












_ 3 


18 


9 16 




8,029 23 


7,679 13 


_ 


- 


-3 




-3 


- 3 


19 


2,413 39 


- 


2,413 39 


2,282 80 


250 00 


/ I 5 

I 1 


212 


] 


- 


- 


20 


2,183 07 


- 


2,183 07 


550 00 


50 00 


1 


3 




- 3 


- 


21 


112,534 56 


- 


113,244 56 


118,149 95 


37,142 33 


/ I 5 

\ 29 
2"' 


} 180 
5 




-3 


- 


22 


9,335 06 


- 


9,335 06 


5,036 73 


400 00 




_3 


- 


23 


93 56 


- 


12,112 87 


13,065 37 


8,409 63 


{ V 


12 


} 


- 


-. 


24 


7 35 


- 


19,150 40 


19,314 32 


10,988 66 


i Y 






- 


- 


25 


16,964 77 


- 


16,964 77 


17,841 52 


300 00 


2 : > 


57 




_ 3 


- 


26 


94,803 01 


/ 1,984 514 
\ 9,349 19 


} 194,196 37 


186,455 52 


35,921 51 


j 9 = 

I 11 


170 2 

-3 


} 


- 3 


-3 


27 


67 26 


~ 


1,212 55 


2,146 45 


404 53 


/ 2 = 
\ 5 


22 


} 


- 


~ 


28 
29 


420 30 


- 


420 30 


43 80 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


30 


59,872 32 


20,003 72 


462,707 33 


481,026 97 


255,280 50 


197 


7,764 




707 


- 


31 


497,558 62 


/ 328,141 574 
\ 72,818 65 


} 2,734,220 95 


2,582,763 11 


_3 


1,186 


10,555 




1,681 


- 


32 


5,773 86 


- 


134,390 01 


124,293 02 


45,924 82 


J 15 
\ 30 


} 20,000 




- 


- 


33 


915 36 


10,000 00 


36,942 51 


27,500 14 


7,826 30 


12 


96 




18 


- 


34 
35 


39,568 17 


- 


39,568 17 


359 30 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


36 


171 41 


- 


5.799 88 


2,864 08 


1,730 31 


1 


2,163 




- 


: 


38 


2,732 75 
3,246 30 


3,100 00 


2,732 75 
6,514 30 


2,284 58 
5,934 42 


- 


- 


21 




- 


: 


39 

to 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



8 Report forfclO months. 



82 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 

2 

3 
4 

5 

6 


Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals (513 beds) 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital, Inc. (35 
beds) ....... 

Massachusetts Prison Association 

Massachusetts Royal Arcanum Hospital Fund 
Association Incorporated .... 

Massachusetts Society for Aiding Discharged 
Prisoners ...... 

Massachusetts Society for Social Hygiene, In- 
corporated ...... 


$4,803,307 22 

147,314 13 
46,583 99 

234 29 

153,334 43 

2,542 39 


$107,500 00 


$98,920 17 

14,180 19 
1,088 00 

646 78 

2,278 45 

5.644 81 


$426,177 49 
86,714 71 


7 


Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals ..... 


2,849,955 80 


_ 


90,668 21 


105,745 87 


8 


Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children .... 


1,327,231 65 




155,010 17 


_ 


9 


Massachusetts Society for the University Ed- 
ucation of Women ..... 


46,407 89 


. 


438 00 


995 00 


10 


Massachusetts Teachers' Federation 


34,307 42 


- 


12,341 02 


17,502 00 


11 


Massachusetts Trustees of the International 
Committee of Youn<? Men's Christian Asso- 
ciations for Army Sr Navy Work (Incorpo- 
rated), The 


586,885 16 




20,747 25 


40,659 14 


12 
13 


Massachusetts Tuberculosis League Inc. 
Massachusetts Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union Inc. ..... 


22,206 19 
36,327 99 


- 


1,282 00 
27,391 21 


47,200 01 
3,578 61 


14 


Massachusetts Woman's Home Missionary 
Union ....... 


179,338 46 


_ 


6,665 69 


- 


15 
16 

17 


Massachusetts Women's Hospital, The (81 beds) 
Master Fishermen's Charitable Association . 
Maverick Dispensary of East Boston 


51,941 00 
7,572 88 
15,821 25 


- 


102 50 
7,560 96 
7,895 95 


125,997 58 
5,719 07 


18 


Merrimac Mission, Incorporated, The . 


135 70 


- 


4,575 91 


- 


19 
20 
21 


Michael Anagnos Schools .... 

Millennium Guild, The .... 

Morgan Memorial Co-operative Industries 

and Stores, Inc., The .... 


250,013 48 
215 28 

1,261,989 85 


~ 


120 00 
42,450 66 


427,011 21 


22 


Mount Pleasant Home, The 


305,086 72 


20,000 00 


5,000 62 


7,959 76 


23 

24 
25 
26 


Mount Sinai Hospital Society of Boston, Mass- 
achusetts 1 ..... 
National Braille Press Inc. .... 
' Needle Woman's Friend Society . 
New Dorchester Hebrew School 1 . 


5,897 89 
57.428 84 


- 


10,015 00 
217 50 


5,984 01 


27 


New England Anti-Vivisection Society, The 


88,368 93 


- 


1,781 43 


44 49 


28 


New England Baptist Hospital (175 beds) 


1,265,702 31 


50,000 00 


2,737 74 


263,044 08 


29 


New England Branch of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church ...... 


60,255 70 




74,307 98 




30 

31 


New England Committee for French Soldiers 
Blinded in Battle, Inc., The 1 . 

New England Deaconess Association (exclud- 
ing hospitals) ...... 


363,543 68 


5,168 40 


11,309 87 


3,424 11 


32 


New England Deaconess Association (Hospital 
in Boston) (180 beds) .... 


1,379,326 91 


438,000 00 


41,552 07 


428,780 00 


33 

34 


New England Deaconess Association (Palmer 
Memorial Hospital for Incurables) (75 beds) 

New England District of the Christian and 
Missionary Alliance Inc. .... 


974,941 02 
18,938 24 


300,000 00 
4,720 00 


50,760 49 
2,895 19 


206,380 53 
403 65 


35 


New England Farm and Garden Association 
Inc 


24,930 11 


_ 


14,720 05 


64,059 87 


36 


New England Grenfell Association 


414,833 98 


- 


62,311 54 


- 


37 


New England Heart Association . 


1.825 07 


- 


485 00 


- 


38 


New England Home for Little Wanderers 


1,733,893 83 


- 


28,477 42 


28,412 83 


39 


New England Hospital for Women and Chil- 
dren (240 beds) 


1,442,332 46 


- 


7,226 71 


163,673 18 



None. 



1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



83 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rental 


Legacies 

3 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average Total 
Number Indi- 
of Paid viduals 
Em- aided 
ployees 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$189,784 66 


$278,555 87 * 


$631,794 97 


$763,132 58 


$345,854 65 


440 




17,862 


2,888 




1 


96 03 
2,159 05 


- 


86,810 74 
3,247 05 


86,068 38 
5,561 02 


31,461 02 
4,000 00 


40 
1* 




2,015 
420 


334 

_3 


- 


2 

3 


1 98 


- 


648 76 


1,029 21 


75 00 


2^ 




47 


~ 


- 


4 


7,735 47 


- 


10,013 92 


6,226 69 


2,550 00 


I- 




1,678 


1,678 


- 


5 


50 50 


- 


5,695 31 


7,425 56 


5,399 39 


\ 1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


6 


114,905 15 


/ 65,033 92 < 
\ 19,359 01 


\ 273,344 78 


251,929 59 


64,679 25 


/ 35 
\ 60 




22 
508,2256 


} 500,1015 


- 


7 


68,545 98 


/ 14,902 87 ^ 
\ 114,447 46 


} 325,870 61 


245,388 10 


165,960 82 


98 




15,262 


15,262 


- 


8 


2,469 20 


- 


3,876 20 


3,825 60 


75 00 


1 




35 


35 


- 


9 


806 75 


~ 


30,657 62 


28,060 72 


10,608 99 


/ 2 « 

I 8 


1 


2 


2 


- 


10 


1,477 77 


_. 


63,898 93 


67,436 87 


38,016 61 


/ 16 

\ 26 


; 


_ 


_ 


_ 


11 


1,011 63 


- 


49,493 64 


47,963 83 


13,632 16 


6 




- 


- 


- 


12 


1,824 89 


1,800 00 


34,594 71 


17,950 20 


4,432 00 


/ 2S 
1 2 


! 


_3 


_3 


_3 


13 


9,377 39 


200 00 


16,243 08 


20,841 08 


500 00 


1^ 


J 

i 


20 2 


} - 


- 


14 


3,146 69 

36 92 

809 43 


7,270 49 « 


129,246 77 

7,597 88 

14,424 45 


136,329 75 

25 00 

14,673 70 


42,230 68 
9,130 58 


79 
14 




1,642 
6,191 


56 

_3 


_3 


15 
16 
17 


77 


- 


4,576 68 


4,831 99 


2,157 00 


2 


/ 
\ 


22 

3,500 


} 3,500 


-3 


18 


15,549 78 


- 


15,549 78 
120 00 


16,493 30 
65 53 


-3 


-3 


63 


- 


19 
20 


9,693 11 


/ 26,192 26" 
I 37,056 06 


1 516,211 04 


483,109 13 


124,543 42 


/ 35 

I 103 


J 


10,071 


1,797 


766 


21 


4,319 19 


/ 368 43 * 
{ 14,345 68 


J 31,675 50 


31,643 06 


10,827 50 


/ 2 5 
I 14 


} 


49 


_3 


- 


22 


66 47 
6,005 69 


200 00 


9,081 47 
12,407 20 


5,302 31 
12,526 59 


2,083 13 
2,909 00 


13 
2 




975 
80 


975 
80 


_ 


23 

24 
25 
26 


4,220 92 


10,750 00 


16,806 87 


7,042 20 


3,276 00 


3 


{ 


6 2 


} 


- 


27 


6,697 10 


/ 5,000 00 * 
\ 1,251 64 


} 273,730 56 


218,423 74 


80,714 99 


95 




4,097 


98 


- 


28 


6,963 63 


/ 30 00* 
\ 15,418 30 


j 94,089 91 


96,457 94 


400 00 


1 




_ 3 


_j 


_3 


29 


12,977 51 


1,300 00 


30,234 37 


66,898 17 


44,555 62 


/ 3' 

I 28 


} 


55 


- 


- 


30 
31 


12,216 22 


/ 20,959 09 < 
\ 50 00 


} 473,131 01 


515,889 14 


155,617 55 


241 




4,768 


1,306 


- 


<2 


13,264 77 


1,301 46 « 


268,844 39 


273,204 10 


93,153 38 


69 




2,861 


_ 3 


- 


J3 


1,365 65 


- 


4,901 09 


4,482 86 


1,103 10 


1 


{ 


I* 


} 


" 


H 


875 31 


- 


69,737 56 


60,729 63 


7,004 50 


6 




1,680 


5 


_ 


J5 


18,922 19 


500 00 * 


43,092 85 


7,168 60 


3,644 69 


3 


{ 


l 2 

_3 


! - 3 


_3 


16 


20 59 


- 


505 59 


216 88 


91 00 


1 


{ 


12 

-3 




- 


M 


77,712 04 


/ 1,659 91 * 
\ 42,664 95 


} 177,302 24 


179,920 50 


81,075 10 


I 10 

I 65 


662 
1.028 


j 334 




18 


50,424 85 


16,433 24 


237,257 98 


247,542 92 


18,709 84 


118 




14,107 


456 




)9 




* Restricted t 


o capital. 




Paid officers, 






8 A 


nimals 







84 



P. D. 17. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property- 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Boston — Con. 
New England Kurn Hattin Homes 

New England Watch and Ward Society, The 

Newsboys Reading Room Association of Bos- 
ton, The ..... 
Nickerson Home for Children 

Norfolk House Centre 

North Bennet Street Industrial School, The 

North End Diet Kitchen, The 

North End Dispensary 
Norwegian Mission Home 

Norwegian Old Peoples Home and Charitable 
Association of Greater Boston . 

Nursery Training School of Boston, The 

Nutrition Clinics, Incorporated 

Oliver Ditson Society for the Relief of Needy 
Musicians 

Order of Sir Galahad, Inc., The 

Order of the Fleur de Lis, Inc. 

Overseers of the Poor of the Town of Boston 
in the Province of Massachusetts Bay in 
New England 1 ..... 

Pan-Albanian Federation of America "Vatra' 
(The Hearth) Inc.. The . 

Pan-Hellenic Relief Organization, Inc. l 
Particular Council Society St. Vincent d< 
Paul of the City of Boston, The l 

Permanent Charity Fund Incorporated, Com 
mittee of the ..... 

Permanent Peace Fund, Trustees of the 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (246 beds) 
Phineas G. Parmenter Foundation, Inc. 
Plymouth Hospital Corporation of Boston 
Polish Home of The Little Flower, Inc. 
Portuguese Immigrant Aid Society of the 

United States of America, Inc., The 
Preachers' Aid Society of the New England 
Annual Conference of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church . 

Rabbinical School of Boston, Inc. 

Resthaven Corporation 

Robert B. Brigham Hospital for Incurables 

(115 beds) 
Robert Gould Sha\ 



House, Inc. 



Robert Treat Paine Association, The 

Rotch Traveling Scholarship, Inc. 
Roxbury Charitable Society, The 

Roxbury Female Benevolent Society 
Roxbury Home for Aged Women 

Roxbury Ladies Aid and Fuel Society, The 

Roxbury Ladies' Club l . . . 

Roxbury Neighborhood House Association 

Rudnick Charitable Foundation, Inc. . 

Rufus F. Dawes Hotel Association 

Rutland Corner House 

Saint Elizabeth's Hospital of Boston (300 beds) 
Saint Elizabeth's Hospital Nurses Alumnae 

Association, Incorporated 
Saint Joseph's Home ..... 

St. Luke's Home for Convalescents 

St. Mary's Infant Asylum and Lying-in-Hos- 
pital (175 beds) 



$24 48 
203,877 32 

51,598 05 
33,860 24 

123,474 78 
191,055 61 

49,108 90 

21,134 90 
10,500 14 

71,584 94 

22,260 75 

177 84 

34,865 08 

1,205 74 

470 64 



37 80 



4,927,983 14 

149,151 93 

6,601,102 75 

2,512 03 

3,965 31 

75,226 71 



717,640 36 

11 40 

42,527 56 

1,835,946 77 
90,460 89 

112.157 38 

83,438 50 
190,700 60 

11,387 77 

393,080 88 

908 63 

50,176 97 
35,977 97 
118,022 58 
112,885 71 
1,142,343 83 

2,238 34 
69,100 67 

337,501 00 
492,638 20 



$8,500 00 



19,000 00 



10,350 00 



227,518 55 



$3,892 74 
5,447 70 

63 00 
1,194 00 

12,117 93 

39,700 78 

5,142 00 

906 17 

1,942 72 

17,405 02 
10,200 00 

600 00 
2,057 00 
6,001 57 



5,758 40 



10,000 00 



24,935 27 
433 00 



,680 86 



38,415 12 
4,537 35 
4,097 99 

6,029 00 
6,825 95 



1,098 00 

3,156 28 
13,894 87 

15,468 80 



75,700 71 

343 20 

1,407 00 

2,393 55 

20,114 33 



None. 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



» Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



85 



Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities, 

: and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$1 48 
9,754 12 


- 


$3,894 22 
15,201 82 


$3,895 00 
15,578 57 


$7,743 50 


{ r 




125 

122 

- 3 


} 


_3 
-3 


300 


1 

2 


4,971 47 
662 91 

8,712 57 


$200 00 

/ 10,000 00 4 
\ 1,000 00 


5,234 47 
6,251 11 

1 24,764 25 


3,260 34 
6,248 77 

27,097 30 


260 00 
1,993 00 

14,457 58 


i 

5 
45 




-3 

73 
2,500 




_ 3 

14 

_ 3 


: 


3 
4 

5 


5,934 32 


3,000 00 4 


106,355 41 


87,051 85 


50,408 89 


82 


/ 
\ 


32 

3,504 


} 


2,928 


- 


6 


2,637 72 


- 


7,779 72 


4,751 20 


_3 


2 


{ 


12 

1,686 


i 


1,686 


- 


7 


- 


- 


1,234 20 


1,269 63 


_ 3 


1 




86 




5 


- 


8 

y 


2,080 80 


- 


14,296 02 


6,412 08 


795 00 


{ r 


} 


25 




- 


- 


10 


334 99 

57 60 


_ 


17,656 96 
12,182 68 


16,255 90 
13,073 73 


10,635 24 
8,939 10 


ii 

3 


{ 


12 

94 


} 


2 


82 


n 

12 


1,870 27 
45 57 
190 90 


: 


2,470 27 
3,001 44 
11,862 78 


2,060 00 
3,983 16 
8,425 43 


2,278 20 
1,867 59 


2 

_ 3 




23 




- 


- 


13 
14 
15 


- 


- 


6,887 93 


7,174 19 


3,410 00 


{ r 


} 


- 




- 


- 


16 
17 

18 


221,689 22 

9,283 00 

224,845 09 

93 13 

52 60 

19 66 


5,000 00 * 


231,750 94 

9,283 00 

706,312 90 

526 13 

52 60 

15,555 04 


238,591 57 

9,283 00 
690,612 52 

13,076 52 


9,058 55 

750 00 
341,413 71 

2,075 00 


l 2 

2 

276 

5 




120 2 \ 
2 ) 

12 

12,321 
50 




2 
1,268 

19 


- 


19 

20 

21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

26 


36,992 12 
19 12 


6900 00 < 


75,407 24 
4,537 35 
7,612 61 


23,563 73 
4,615 07 
6,650 35 


3,525 00 
3,640 00 
2,446 95 


/ 1* 
I 1 
7 
/ I 6 

I 5 


} 
} 


122 

-3 




122 

_3 


_3 
-3 


27 
28 

29 


87,674 39 
3,332 98 

5,790 53 

4,470 44 
9,209 45 

593 69 


20,000 00 < 
1,000 00 * 


182,787 74 
10,451 25 

5,790 53 

4,470 44 
11,357 45 

593 69 


212,876 43 
11,068 72 

4,991 50 

3,268 80 
11,467 13 

648 55 


108,372 87 
6,497 40 

50 00 


104 
13 

1 


{ 
I 

I 
1 


844 

605 

46 2 

— 3 

3 

22 

14 


} 

: 


352 
411 

_3 

_3 


_ 3 

278 
1 


30 
31 

32 

33 
34 

35 


20,809 58 


1,100 60 


26,065 86 


21,888 66 


6,528 52 


( 1« 

I 9 


24 




_ 


_ 


36 


42 82 


- 


13,937 69 


15,037 57 


1,722 40 


2 


I 


92 
_3 


} 


_3 


64 


37 


217 55 
2,118 31 

7,614 31 
1,546 35 


- 


17,936 09 
2,118 31 

10,144 25 

8,058 50 

535,736 41 


18,674 04 

997 50 

8,758 92 

6,654 47 

532,918 36 


14,119 29 

5,322 56 

3,621 50 

178,957 24 


15 

6 

4 

107 


; 

/ 
\ 


1,607 

48 2 

5 

43,148 

332 

577 

18,768 


} 

! 


_3 

5 

384 
5,005 


_3 
_3 


38 

39 

40 
41 
42 
43 


107 28 
751 31 

22,052 39 


/ 149 41 * 
I 10,204 79 


841 97 
13,625 31 

} 36,060 53 


887 39 
14,633 66 

22,845 56 


50 00 
3,839 00 

10,926 19 


1* 
12 

12 




_ 3 

114 
349 




_3 

68 
237 


-3 


44 

u 

4C 


2,607 84 


11,084 72 


157,007 52 


152,511 56 


37,879 61 


83 




1,465 




42 


- 


4" 



Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



6 Animals. 



86 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property- 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 
and Gifts 
Restricted 



Boston — Con. 

Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorpo 
rated. The 

Sanders Fund, Inc. .... 
Scandinavian Sailors' Home. Inc. ' 
Scientific Temperance Federation. The . 
Scollay Square Service Club (Incorporated) 
Scots Charitable Society, The 
Sears and Other Funds, Trustees of the 

Shaw Fund for Mariners' Children 

Sisterhood of Congregation Beth Hamidrash 

Hadadol, The .... 

Sisters of Lord Beaconsfield Aid Society, Inc 
Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians 

and Colored People in Massachusetts, Inc. 

The 

Societa di Mutuo Soccorso e Beneficenza 

Canicattinese, Incorporated 
Society for Ministerial Relief 
Society for the Relief of Aged or Disabled 

Episcopal Clergymen 
Society for the Relief of the Widows and 

Orphans of Clergymen of the Protestant 

Episcopal Church 
Society of St. Margaret (St. Monica's Home) 

(21 beds) 

Sofia American Schools, Inc. 

Solomon M. Hyams Fund, Inc. 

South Boston Neighborhood House 

South Boston Samaritan Society . 
South End Day Nursery, The 

South End Day Nursery Auxiliary 

South End Diet Kitchen of Boston, The 

South End Dispensary and Hospital, The 6 

South End House Association, The 

South End Music School, The 
Southern Middlesex Health Association 

Speech Readers Guild of Boston, The . 

Stearns Fund, Inc. .... 
Students' Aid Foundation, Incorporated, The 
Students House Corporation 

Sunny Bank Home, The 

Sunnyside Day Nursery, The 
Swedish Home of Peace ("Fridhem") 
Swiss Benevolent Society 
Syrian Ladies' Aid Society, The . 
Syrian Roman-Catholic Melkite Society l 
Tabernacle Society of Boston, The 
Talitha Cumi Maternity Home and Hospital 
(Talitha Cumi Home) 

Three-fold Movement-League of Neighbors, 
Fellowship of Faiths, Union of East and 
West (Incorporated), The 

Travelers Aid Society of Boston, Inc. . 

Tremont Dispensary, The 1 . 

Trinity Church Home for the Aged (Rachel 
Allen Memorial) 7 

Trinity Neighborhood House and Day Nursery 

Union Rescue Mission, The 

Unitarian Foundation, Inc. 

Unitarian Service Pension Society, The 
United Hebrew Benevolent Association of 
Boston ...... 



$4,277,250 16 


1,069 81 


9,188 51 


12,004 41 


83,355 32 


290,968 94 


627,469 45 


659 04 
303 27 


10,368 85 


739 24 

389,032 21 


209,000 00 


249,875 53 


53,518 53 
820,183 81 


1,499,153 11 


12,613 47 


2,053 50 
61,223 66 


8,928 74 


61,970 81 


385,134 68 


48,125 80 
43,427 66 


47,465 78 


27,070 39 


2,324 02 


102,238 36 


79,385 99 


40,326 28 
12,356 04 
2,078 12 
5,733 58 


1,594 00 


295,175 68 


14,296 54 


173,065 03 


83,756 73 


8,860 26 


507,451 24 


19,911 25 



$1,544,088 62 



3,000 00 



20,000 00 

12,000 00 
7,000 00 

10,000 00 



55,000 00 



,000 00 



$447,665 02 
20,031 48 

5,871 93 

7,334 07 

279 00 



1,711 59 
74 25 



2,760 



361 00 

875 66 



19,731 92 
181,965 80 

24,500 00 
5,878 60 

6,127 65 
648 93 

5,643 00 

31,299 39 

9,369 77 
1,227 99 

12,894 35 
8,688 90 



608 75 

100 00 

4,796 75 
277 70 
168 50 

1,024 35 

2,677 12 
15,587 57 



1.918 49 
28,569 35 



3,908 44 

13,128 40 
52,823 09 
13,611 70 



None. 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



4 Restricted to capital. 5 Paid officers. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



87 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 





$12 10 


1,030 87 


539 40 


3,474 60 


14,698 64 


30,266 91 


30 69 
22,091 97 


14,759 82 


12,986 30 


895 68 
30,662 42 


44,862 71 


22 08 


54 00 
1,994 46 


356 78 


3,243 16 


16,512 44 


70 07 

173 27 


2,396 61 


3,269 61 


3 95 


275 05 


3,902 20 


823 90 


87 91 
779 10 


25 62 


10,807 96 


732 88 


3,752 21 


439 54 


230 18 


72 38 


971 25 



$6,770 95^ 



3 184 



15.778 00 



10.000 00 



100 004 



300 00 

1.000 004 
10.125 00 



5,000 00 
6,376 04 



$845,810 53 
20,043 58 

12,424 18 
8,585 98 
3,785 85 

14,698 64 

30,266 91 

1.763 64 

74 25 

2,908 39 

391 69 
22,967 63 

14,759 82 



12,986 30 

11,511 88 
94,299 02 

69,362 71 

6,321 64 

54 00 
24,656 88 

6.051 40 

8.886 16 



57,567 05 

18.694 64 
26,242 67 

16,437 11 

12,071 51 

736 40 

49,437 98 

4,873 06 

6,458 55 

6,705 96 

271 86 

3,972 55 

4,383 87 

44.233 68 



1.979 79 
29.302 23 



13,522 95 

13.587 76 
53.066 92 
20,060 12 

971 25 



$882,476 23 
20,353 47 

11,961 21 
8,707 20 
3,652 79 

14,792 50 

30,066 40 

1,104 60 

87 74 



3,301 88 

511 05 
23,483 88 

7,313 37 

11,336 50 

11,315 54 
104,337 89 

49,209 60 
7,015 79 

9,270 31 
6,789 88 

8,845 13 

59,804 48 

15,688 69 
25,759 44 

17,363 89 

45,245 09 

47 83 

40,701 26 

4,282 49 

9,384 87 

6,549 97 

195 62 

2,064 24 

5,003 97 

35,464 70 



1,919 52 
28,718 91 



11,972 08 

13,515 69 
59,995 70 
17.384 98 

971 25 



$283,762 31 
1,200 00 

8,950 00 

2,621 00 

300 00 

312 50 

3,500 00 



200 00 



4,456 00 
52,524 54 

146 89 
5,432 59 

5,282 21 



30,234 23 

12,120 27 
6,326 70 

9,323 40 
1,035 00 

12.180 90 



4.380 86 
1,618 00 



15,859 03 



62 65 
23,318 78 



5,967 00 

8,012 96 
1,705 00 



3' 

594 

3 : 



276,426 

112 

172 



29,000 



107 
22 



22 
397 



10 



58 
11 

71 

40 
420 



42 

431 

58 
83 

12 
12 

1.074 

752 
3,000 
304 
140 

392 
820 
1032 
174 

11 



82 
137 



44 
358 



27,358 



■:?, 



2,916 
122 



121,118 
172 



29,000 
107 



552 



3 
22 

174 



41 



2,916 
74 



8 Name changed to Freeman L. Lowell Memorial Hospital and Dispensary. 



Report for 9 months. 



88 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 




Boston —Con. 










1 


Vernon Advent Christian Home Inc. 


$20,468 96 


- 


$908 33 


$3,336 63 


2 


Vincent Memorial Hospital, The (22 beds) 


459,293 10 


$40,000 00 


43,763 48 


16,654 29 


3 


Walker Missionary Homes, Inc. . 


191,614 61 


- 


9,201 27 


9,380 92 


4 


Washingtonian Home ..... 


145,768 c9 


- 


917 96 


14,676 48 


5 
6 

7 
8 
9 


Welcome House, Inc. ..... 

Wells Memorial Association 
West End House Alumni Association, Inc. 
West End House, Inc., The 
West End Matan Basaiser Charitable Asso- 
ciation ....... 


62,043 11 

1,253 44 

486,980 77 

53 60 


10,000 00 


9,145 00 

3,485 05 

25,599 00 

1,261 35 


3,858 09 

5,132 33 

425 20 


10 
11 
12 
13 


West End Young Mens Hebrew Association 
Westminster Foundation, Inc. 
Widows' Society in Boston .... 
William Lawrence Camp, Inc. 


44,043 49 

32,028 37 

292,303 12 

24.129 97 


28,000 00 
19,400 00 

4,000 00 


6,646 75 
7,512 00 
3,660 00 


6,006 43 
7,143 07 


14 


Winchester Home for Aged Women 


222,072 06 


- 


3,204 16 


2,748 83 


15 
16 


Womans Auxiliary of the New England Bap- 
tist Hospital . . . 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Char- 
itable Society . . . . . . 


506 63 
34,322 27 


: 


1,231 50 
593 22 


1,018 94 


17 


Woman's Board of Missions (Congregational) 


590,394 46 


- 


4,384 66 


- 


18 
19 

20 


Woman's Charity Club, The 

Woman's Home Missionary Society of the 
New England Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church (Cooper Community 
Centre) 

Woman's Home Missionary Society of the 
New England Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church (Medical Mission) 


374,119 42 

53,576 17 
97,884 97 


70,000 00 
6,408 39 

- 3 


28,284 12 

5,624 23 
15,518 95 


3,393 77 

744 61 
16,450 76 


21 


Woman's Seaman's Friend Society 


14,717 68 


- 


1,937 30 


40 88 


22 


Woman's Universalist Missionary Society of 
Massachusetts, The .... 


49,369 94 


- 


8,045 89 


_ 


23 


Women's Educational and Industrial Union . 


72,791 25 


- 


16,931 62 


1,353,071 83 


24 


Women's Educational and Industrial Union, 
Trustees of the 


761,410 33 


410,000 00 


- 


_ 


25 

26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


Women's Municipal League Committees, In- 
corporated ...... 

Women's Palestine Agricultural Association 
Inc. (The Palagrass) .... 

Women's Scholarship Association 

Wood Memorial Home, Inc. 

Working Girls Home, The .... 

Y D Overseas Memorial, Inc. 

Young Men's Educational Aid Association, 
The 


1,210 03 

140 46 

963 98 

1,019,941 93 

294,531 22 

2,594 27 


19,000 00 


8,211 60 

124 00 
551 65 

19,223 45 
100 50 


673 75 
2,145 12 

86,465 83 


32 
33 

34 


Young Men's Hebrew Association of Boston 
Young Traveler's Aid Society, The 
Young Viggianese Club of East Boston 


233,812 92 

26,992 19 

48 63 


25,000 00 


18,503 45 
186 35 


5,904 35 


35 


BOXFORD 

Female Charitable Society of West Boxford 


416 53 


- 


8 00 


211 37 


36 

37 
38 


Braintree 
Braintree Friendly Aid Association 
Briantree Young Men's Christian Association 
Norfolk County Health Association, Inc. 


2,253 68 
1,216 00 
2,119 02 


- 


3,467 23 
750 00 


2,597 38 
16,099 80 


39 


Brewster 
Brewster Woman's Club (Inc.), The 


3,572 11 


1,500 00 


- 


- 


i0 


Bridgewater 

Bridgewater Visiting Nurse Association 


8,016 48 


- 


549 66 


1,477 24 


41 
42 
43 

44 


Brockton 
Boys Club of Brockton 1 

Brockton Day Nursery .... 
Brockton Girl Scouts, Inc. .... 
Brockton Hospital Company (130 beds) 


27,220 76 

4,441 30 

933,439 72 


65,000 00 


1,720 06 

1,854 60 

51,916 25 


460 92 

3,752 70 

146,735 05 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



ft; II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
N umber 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$2,475 00* 
12,406 40 
500 00 



2,700 00 4 
2,975 00 4 

3,455 06 4 



2,000 00 4 

500 00 « 
14,707 24 
3,273 59 



100 00 
100 00 



5,000 00' 



14,000 52' 



$4,496 57 
53,907 41 
19,429 95 
22,931 52 

21,816 46 

3,500 89 

22,024 76 

1,686 55 

6,506 43 

6,646 75 

22,145 47 

7,288 64 

15,984 90 

1,231 66 

3,426 12 

35,082 66 
35,949 92 



7,399 50 



32,442 
2,720 

10,557 
1,396,836 



790 65 



8,223 80 



220 12 



6,142 65 

60 26 

16,885 21 



34 90 



2,242 11 



3,276 08 

5,605 30 

211,660 83 



$5,261 86 
45,196 87 
20,757 60 
25,066 63 

21,633 40 

2,206 30 

26,029 29 



45 



1, 

5,270 02 

5,783 60 

18,586 15 

7,612 92 

13,804 13 

726 65 
2,586 07 

49,259 10 

3,800 69 



7,462 97 



30,360 26 
3,038 75 



10,410 95 
1,402,165 63 



25 36 



7,546 51 



798 79 

2,992 51 

69,426 49 

86,578 80 

19,800 43 


1,270 83 

2,945 38 

2,752 77 

88,580 41 

43,975 43 


100 50 


100 50 


26,892 91 

1,420 37 

186 35 


23,364 08 

1,450 00 

314 32 



43 24 

6,076 47 
15,726 00 



3,067 62 



3,430 17 

6,209 63 

202,189 69 



$2,317 21 

18,349 10 

7,034 08 

10,196 60 

12,148 00 

11,932 75 

290 25 

1,092 00 

3,600 00 

1,012 50 

1,305 44 

4,393 00 



260 00 



4,113 50 



15,672 82 
1,500 00 



431,771 28 



6,096 21 



26,288 23 



3,840 68 
2,193 29 



1,733 33 



1,336 83 

1.746 50 

87,820 66 



/ 1 

1 375 



3 

1 
103 



17 
340 
182 

745 

1,736 

1,200 

6 
200 

1,200 
110 
130 

29 



360 



34, 



107,630 

12 

8 
2,486 

102 
38 



2,139 



354 



252 

258 

6,895 



3 
109 



200 

— i 

110 

25 



75 



13,358 



107,630 



931 

38 



1,066 



39 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



90 



P. D. 17: 

Abstracts of Reports of PrivaU\ 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 


Brockton — Con. 
Brockton Humane Society, The . 


$11,769 94 


_ 


$95 00 


$935 96 


2 


Brockton Rotary Charitable and Educational 
Association, Inc. . . . . . 


3,029 32 


- 


1,360 85 


855 00 


3 


Brockton Social Service Council, Inc. . 


22,504 50 


- 


150,591 43 


- 


4 
5 


Brockton Visiting Nurse Association 
Brockton Young Men's Christian Association, 
The 


25,832 31 
536,528 43 


$81,500 00 


13,303 00 
30,945 40 


18,996 19 
37,184 76 


6 


Brockton Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion ....... 


217,287 78 


10,000 00 


22,170 58 


27,509 13 


7 


Community Service of Brockton Inc. 


18 17 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nursery, 
Trustees of the ..... 


20,540 15 


- 


_ 


_ 


9 


Ellis Brett Neighborhood Center of Com- 
munity Service of Brockton, Inc. 


931 57 


- 


_ 


_ 


10 


Family Welfare Association of Brockton 


1,240 11 


- 


7,234 50 


2,584 86 ! 


11 
12 


Home for Aged Men in the City of Brockton, 
Trustees of the ..... 

Mothers' League of Brockton, Inc. l 


236,249 78 


- 


- 


~" 


13 


Pilgrim Foundation, The .... 


997,922 97 


- 


35 00 


- 


14 
15 

16 

17 


Plymouth County Health Association, Inc. 
Sarah J. Pettee Memorial Scholarship Fund, 

Trustees of 7 . 
Sprague Neighborhood Center, Brockton, Inc. l 
Wales Home for Aged Women, The 


1,008 95 
2,684 41 

190,010 60 


- 


672 25 

704 40 


16,377 96 
2,428 46 


18 


Woman's Club of Brockton .... 


22,695 11 


- 


8,007 67 


4,808 81 


19 


Brookline 
American Ramabai Association, The 


31,988 88 


_ 


1,326 41 


13 50 


20 


Brookline Friendly Society, The . 


126,379 15 


- 


20,458 07 


7,768 88 I 


21 


Brookline Service Club, Inc. 


289 66 


- 


1,357 28 


- 


22 


Brooks Hospital (38 beds) .... 


239,045 08 


70,000 00 


6,000 00 


109,287 70 


23 


Christian Science Benevolent Association, The 
(148 beds) 


1,498,723 09 


- 


68,038 23 


246,300 88 


24 
25 


Eloist Ministry, Inc., The .... 
Frauen Verein 1 ..... 


50,378 11 


7,500 00 


10,255 72 


7,961 14 


26 


Free Hospital for Women (97 beds) 


3,069,358 26 


- 


84,689 90 


131,338 22 


27 


Gulick-Farnsworth Fund, Inc. 


2,714 83 


- 


- 


- 


28 


Cambridge 
Ames Foundation ..... 


10.952 54 


_ 


1,265 23 


_ 


29 


Avon Home, The ..... 


326.484 04 


- 


5,484 12 


12,521 18 


30 
31 
32 


Boston and Maine Railroad Employees' Fund, 
Incorporated ...... 

Cambridge and Somerville Gemelath Chesed 
Charitable Loan Association 

Cambridge Community Center, Inc. 


101,815 19 

4,180 62 
5 69 


- 


520 88 
341 30 


7,410 00 ■ 


33 


Cambridge Hebrew Women's Aid Society, The 


477 35 


- 


882 50 


2,345 88 ■ 


34 


Cambridge Homes for Aged People 


510,010 74 


- 


3,553 00 


4,037 21 


35 


Cambridge Hospital (226 beds) . 


1.164,112 41 


- 


4,005 92 


167,746 28 


36 


Cambridge Neighborhood House . 


538,835 10 


131,947 00 


5,766 60 


3,557 73 


37 
38 
39 


Cambridge- port Fruit and Flower Mission, The 
Cambridge Rotary Educational Fund Inc. 
Cambridge Tuberculosis Association 


1,366 52 
1,287 52 
6,213 85 


: 


396 11 

208 23 
4,416 80 


434 50 
11,006 94 | 


40 
41 


Cambridge Visiting Nursing Association, The 
Cambridge Welfare Union 8 . 


69,554 96 


- 


10,262 36 


14,826 25 


42 


Cambridge Young Men's Christian Association 


462,639 42 


79,500 00 


12,256 40 


104,553 00 


43 
44 


Cambridge Young Women's Christian Associ- 
ation, The 1 ...... 

Columbus Day Nursery of Cambridge . 


35,556 68 


13,800 00 


3.578 00 


1 
114 51 f 



- None. ! No report. 2 Organizations aided. 

8 Name changed to The Family Welfare Society of Cambridge. 



3 Not stated. 



Jpt. II. 




















C 


>1 


.Charitable Corporations — Continued. 








;■ Interest, 
■ Dividends, 
: Annuities, 
. and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 

Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$606 67 


$3,000 00 


$4,639 63 


$3,274 11 


$1,780 00 


/ 3& 

I 2 


} 


7,000 « 




_3 


- 


1 


66 19 


- 


2,282 04 


850 00 


_ 


. 




7 




- 


_3 


2 


155 57 


131 60 


150,878 60 


136,756 41 


4,019 00 


3 


{ 


15 2 


} 


- 


- 


3 


1,195 02 


- 


33,494 21 


33,770 19 


29,525 79 


19 


1,094 




543 


-3 


4 


35,260 00 


- 


103,390 16 


103,607 74 


_3 


24 




2,102 




- 


- 


5 


3,281 03 


- 


52,960 74 


53,102 28 
94 25 


24,138 97 


20 


J 
I- 


92 
5,947 


} 


2,104 


- 


6 

7 


535 60 


- 


535 60 


535 60 


- 


- 


J 
I 


12 
_3 


} 


-3 


- 


8 


36 95 


- 


36 95 


- 


_ 


_ 




_ 




_ 


- 


9 


1 47 


- 


9,820 83 


10,110 22 


4,846 00 


{ i' 


} 


- 




~ 


328 


ID 


9,926 27 


- 


9,926 27 


9,628 06 


3,310 00 


{ r 


} 


7 




_3 


- 


11 

12 
13 


48,960 26 


- 


48,995 26 


46,273 45 


2,080 00 


15 


{ 


252 
1,436 
73 


} 


_3 


374 


120 46 


- 


17.170 67 


18,209 68 


3,069 72 


3 




72 


_3 


14 


255 37 


- 


255 37 


100 00 


- 


- 




- 




- 


- 


15 
L6 

17 


8,205 85 


6,000 00 


17,338 71 


11,175 14 


4.675 10 


/ I 5 
I 5 


} 


21 




21 


- 


648 64 


9,500 00 


22,965 12 


12,350 34 


- 




{ 


152 
310 


} 


310 


165 


18 


1,247 59 


- 


2,587 50 


1,102 90 


- 


_ 




2,000 




2,000 


- 


19 


4,950 34 


11.900 00 4 


33,177 29 


33,520 05 


23,172 12 


{ li" 




62 
1,328 


J 


245 


158 


20 


- 


- 


1,357 28 


5,807 00 


- 




{ 


52 


| 


- 


28 


21 


757 15 


10,233 33 


127,998 68 


114,891 92 


55,541 45 


47 


1,088 




- 


- 


22 


5,937 26 


/ 10,000 00 4 
{ 39,013 67 


\ 359,543 22 


397,503 64 


323,692 81 


175 




2,130 




109 


- 


2:5 


- 


- 


18,216 86 


17,739 90 


9,902 58 


/ 2* 
I 6 


} 


_3 




_3 


-3 


24 
25 


106,698 17 


/ 7,000 00 4 
[ 31,060 41 


\ 353,870 50 


270,608 09 


70,103 49 


102 




9,852 




9,364 


- 


26 

27 


509 55 


_ 


1,774 78 


2,331 19 


. 














28 


16,905 40 


116 40 4 


33,560 70 


32,692 57 


11,841 38 


8 


{ 


32 
221 


} 


98 


459 


29 


7,096 93 


- 


7,096 93 


6,720 37 


- 


- 




184 




_3 


_ 1 


30 


9 65 
2 73 


- 


7,940 53 
1,705 21 


7,301 68 
1,704 06 


100 00 


1& 




146 




146 


- 


31 
32 


- 


- 


3,228 38 


3,295 99 


- 


- 


{ 


42 
_ 3 


} 


-3 


-3 


33 


20,385 91 


3,723 17 


32,592 79 


25,450 30 


9,858 92 


f 1* 
104 




56 




- 


- 


31 


37,769 54 


/ 23,104 77 4 
1 2,826 92 


} 212,348 66 


215,216 07 


84,450 77 


7,128 




780 


- 


35 


17 01. 


- 


9,341 34 


8,535 35 


5,215 07 


9 


{ 


32 
397 


} 


_ 


700 


36 


69 41 

48 80 
499 16 


: 


465 52 

691 53 

15,922 90 


470 51 

425 00 

15,918 90 


6.622 76 


5 


174 
2 
52 


174 

— 3 

45 


_ 


37 
38 
39 


2,253 40 




27,342 01 


24.890 05 


13,828 99 


11 




4,283 




1.785 


-3 


40 
41 

42 


6,739 98 


- 


123,549 38 


133.693 63 


63,513 14 


50 


{ 


102 

1,441 


1 


. 3 


-3 


1,085 55 


- 


4,778 06 


4,909 32 


1,083 00 


1 




2.298 




- 


- 


43 
44 


4 Restricted 


to capital. 


1 Paid officers. 


6 Animals 


7 Name changed to Pettee-Chace Scholorship Fund. 



























92 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Cambridge — Con. 

Council for the Clinical Training of Theological 

Students, Inc. $124 

East End Union of Cambridge, Massachusetts 48,244 79 

Family Welfare Society of Cambridge, The . 43,250 91 

Harvard Legal Aid Bureau . 

Holy Ghost Hospital for Incurables, The (215 

beds) 747,511 92 

Howard Benevolent Society of Cambridge . 
Middlesex Charitable Infirmaries, Inc. (100 

beds) 196,985 63 

St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum . . . 540,113 01 

Tide Over League, Inc. .... 

United Pentecostal Council of the Assemblies 

of God, Inc. ...... 

Wesley Foundation at Harvard University, The 

Canton 

Canton Hospital and Nursing Association . 5,678 78 

Canton Playgrounds Association, The . 

Chatham 
Chatham Visiting Nurse Association, Incor- 
porated ....... 1,618 61 

Chelsea 

Chebra Kadisha of Chelsea 1 

Chelsea Day Nursery and Children's Home . 

Chelsea Hebrew Charitable Loan Association 

The* 

Chelsea Hebrew Sheltering Home . . 4,921 52 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital (107 beds) . 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital Aid Association, 

Inc., The 637 61 

Chelsea Young Men's Christian Association 150,000 00 

Chevra Bikur Cholim of Chelsea . 

Chevra Thilim & Gemilath Chesed Associa 
tion, Inc. of Chelsea 1 .... 

Hebrew Free Loan Association of Chelsea 

Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association x 

Old Ladies Home Association of Chelsea, Mass- 
achusetts ... . . 

Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Trustees of 
the 6 

Clinton 

Clinton District Nursing Association, Inc. . 2,895 82 

Clinton Home for Aged People, The . . 122,611 

Clinton Hospital Association, The (87 beds) . 328,625 63 

Clinton-Lancaster Tuberculosis Association . 

C oh asset 
Beechwood Improvement Association, Incor- 
porated 2,812 64 

Bonnie Bairns Association .... 244 34 

Cohasset Horse Show Association, Inc. . . 6.243 36 

Sandy Beach Association .... 33,406 

Concord 

Concord Female Charitable Society, The 14,380 20 

Concord's Home for the Aged 

Emerson Hospital in Concord (48 beds) x 

Women's Parish Association 

Dalton 

Berkshire Animal Rescue League . 

W. Murray Crane Community House, Trus- 
tees of The 271,257 27 

Young Men's Christian Association of Dalton 103,411 80 

Zenas Crane Fund for Student Aid Inc. 

Danvers 

Danvers Home for the Aged . . . J 105,178 04 



$15,000 00 



141,970 18 



46,250 00 
19,500 00 



1,050 00 



$6,574 08 

5,181 00 

26,101 86 

500 00 

17,137 59 



594 00 
3,701 85 
2,868 00 

1,127 86 

4,601 00 



2,743 80 

1,462 00 

742 52 

863 41 
96 00 

1,569 53 
11,414 39 

1,851 31 

255 68 
2,668 53 



253 00 
443 23 
,950 30 

113 90 



3 85 

2.200 00 
500 00 



583 37 
95 00 



1,064 53 



295 95 

326 10 
2,992 80 
5,000 00 



2,840 56 



- None. 



1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



I. II. 

^aritable Corporations — Continued. 



93 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$50 00 



10,500 00* 
18,115 86 



.573 29 



/ 7.473 60 
\ 1,100 38 



2.000 00 
8.786 00 



12,254 92* 



$6,574 08 

7,246 79 

29,865 65 

520 00 

159.522 C5 
401 62 

59,692 67 
36,593 27 
8,608 68 

1,127 86 
4,601 00 



4,990 18 
1,074 36 



2.133 28 



5,472 67 



863 41 
134,455 11 



2,447 91 
18,804 25 

1,851 31 



17,907 78 
7,246 30 



3,333 36 
8,289 51 
73.425 82 

2,297 90 



543 80 



5,281 05 
2,926 55 



1,307 24 
4,330 52 



1,674 70 

6,650 28 

7,944 91 

10,099 30 

4,617 27 



$6,450 41 

8,879 64 

29,537 60 

457 03 

140,284 95 
264 17 

63,471 65 

19,255 89 
8,625 26 

1,091 50 
4,601 00 



5,018 67 
2,086 99 



2,184 17 



6,721 00 



498 83 
126,840 35 



2,179 14 

18,852 56 

2,370 25 



17,912 75 
3,969 86 



2.978 71 
6,310 37 



60,472 30 


1,434 30 


331 60 


4,967 04 


2,007 62 


1,332 25 
3,605 93 


1,669 18 


2,246 33 


6,840 93 
7,562 76 
10,497 18 


5,326 25 



$5,933 96 
6,475 30 
19,312 88 


12 
6 
6 


31,797 13 


62 


25,045 29 
2,989 00 
3,165 50 


30 
15 

1 


2,748 56 
430 00 


2 
2 


1,550 49 


1 


3,091 50 


5 


25 00 


15 


49,444 63 


38 


8,154 00 


7 


503 41 


{ r 


250 00 


2 


1,539 00 


3 


2,910 75 
2,399 25 
25,710 83 


2 

4 
31 


53 50 


-3 


1,025 67 


2 



1,460 52 



1,440 00 



4,639 87 
20 00 



1,830 10 



536 

52 

302 

438 
24 

3,981 
91 



75 



OS 4 



4 r , 



3,331 



100 
676 



364 



3,245 

14 

1,684 

3 : 



42 
4,545 



262 

52 

302 

43 

24 

803 

5 

985 



249 



334 



676 



4 Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



6 Report not due. 



94 



13 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Danvers — Con. 
Danvers Visiting Nurse Association 
New England Home for Deaf Mutes, The 
(Aged Blind or Infirm) .... 

Putnam Home, Inc. ..... 

Robert A. MacFadden Educational Fund Inc. 

D ED HAM 
Andrew H. Hodgdon Memorial Fund, Inc. 
Dedham Community Association, Inc. . 
Dedham Emergency Nursing Association, The 

Dedham Temporary Home for Women and 

Children 

Social Service Board of Dedham, Inc., The . 

Duxbury 
Duxbury Nurse Association, Inc., The . 

Easthampton 
Easthampton Home for Aged Women . 
Helping Hand Society .... 

Easton 
Eastondale Community Club 



Essex 
Camp Chebacco, Inc. .... 

Everett 
Church Home Association, The . 

Everett Cottage Hospital (50 beds) 
Everett Home for Aged Persons 

Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Everett . 

Mutual Help Association of the People of 
Monaster: The Birthday of Virgin Mary, 
The 1 

Fairhaven 
Fairhaven Benevolent Association 
Fairhaven King's Daughters Home for the 
Aged, Inc. ...... 

Ladies Benevolent Society, The . 



Fall River 
Achnosas Orchim, Inc. l 
Animal Rescue League of Fall River 
Associacao de Carridade do Ispirito Santo d 
Santissima Trindade 

Association for Community Welfare in Fall 
River, The 

Bishop Stang Day Nursery, The 1 

Boys Club of Fall River 

Children's Home of Fall River 

District Nursing Association of Fall River 
Incorporated . . • . 

Fall River Anti-Tuberculosis Society, The 



Fall River Deaconess Home, 



The 

Charitable Insti 



Fall River Hebrew Women 

tution . 
Fall River High School Alumni Scholarships 

Trustees of .... 
Fall River Jewish Home for the Aged, Inc 
Fall River Women's Union . 
Franciscan Missionaries of Mary . 
Hebrew Free School Society * 
Hebrew Ladies Aid Association, The 1 . 

Home for Aged People in Fall River 

Junior League of Fall River Inc. 

Mt. Lebanon Society .... 



$16,702 48 

177.932 79 

52,275 73 

877 26 



13,671 63 
46,680 88 

30.790 21 



'5,920 14 
1.285 48 



2.362 28 



657 66 
16.214 48 



805 71 

106 69 

8,536 18 

6,592 29 

37,398 17 

723 04 



56,611 41 


5,294 04 


1,369 84 


87,052 37 


1,500 00 


1,098 37 


194,925 51 
!50,595 11 


54,416 06 


11,361 70 



94,500 00 



65,432 83 

14,602 11 

159,146 35 

18,401 59 



2,554 44 
8,532 30 



$7,000 00 



4,000 00 



3,000 00 



>,300 00 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



$3,761 99 

22.007 02 
200 00 



13,338 00 
10,803 00 

8,670 42 



5,549 81 
4,331 91 



1,507 84 



140 87 
3,277 50 



51 80 

100 00 

1,718 57 

1,385 50 
605 00 

364 45 



7 00 



7,950 00 

3,990 67 
1,201 00 

27,160 79 
44 00 

9,030 70 
300 00 



3.136 95 
3,094 26 
4,667 44 



1,272 50 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



455 78 



1,462 16 



4,000 00 



51,308 27 
392 60 



569 42 



,175 04 


1,258 00 


21 00 


258 2i 


203 00 


1,584 41 


349 31 


_ 



8,025 88 
2,494 82 

16,120 28 
4,328 88 

3,304 70 



2,446 04 
3,614 80 
3.486 70 



4,326 64 



None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



t. II. 

haritable Corporations 



Continued. 



95 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 
aided 

exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$10,500 00 
2,500 00 



3,538 37 
3,278 00 



12,000 00 
38,789 89 



$14,626 80 

20,856 35 
4,105 52 

854 54 

13,778 51 

69,152 67 

16,563 50 

26,628 91 
4,344 74 

2,075 13 



140 87 
7,319 94 



63 15 

4,137 08 

2,009 56 

54,900 79 
3,228 32 

959 99 



4,532 40 

3,281 56 
285 74 



12,792 25 
349 31 

11,110 00 

24,765 27 
18,034 11 

49,301 43 
4,472 66 

18,102 18 

300 00 

4,761 31 
5,582 99 
10,560 86 
8.154 14 



28,472 99 

10,173 59 
1,422 50 



$3,760 78 

19,195 48 
3,697 73 
1,342 00 

106 88 
69,293 81 

13,669 13 

23,995 08 
4,193 74 

2,007 68 

9,648 80 
133 20 

4.030 39 

2.031 44 

53,904 55 
3,164 52 

912 94 



4,074 96 

3,488 68 
248 13 

6,301 05 
362 69 

11,992 92 

25,838 23 
18,832 92 

53,870 23 
3,035 58 

18,102 18 

300 00 

4,471 00 
5,477 35 
10,389 51 
8,206 56 



22,817 70 

10,035 57 
970 20 



$2,445 15 

7,635 32 
1,529 48 



3,479 70 
6,710 09 



10,541 03 
1,300 00 



1,436 59 



2.112 92 



1,477 00 

1,300 00 

19,182 74 
1,076 34 



240 00 
1.141 70 



3,220 00 
10 00 

6,830 16 

14,815 10 
9,404 38 

47,259 80 
388 00 

6,917 33 



1,511 85 
5.367 70 



10.336 39 

2,033 70 
60 00 



1,577 
549 



2- 
289 



135 



12 
1,671 
7 
3 2 

51 



4,221 « 
1 



2,925 
134 



5,425 

12 



62 

962 



100 



835 



676 

1 

244 



135 



2,000 6 



29 

828 



770 



KM) 



835 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



Animals. 



96 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 
3 

4 

• r » 
6 


Fall River — Con. 
St. Anne's Hospital Corporation (110 beds) 
Saint Joseph's Orphanage .... 
Saint Vincent's Home Corporation of Fall 
River, The ... . . 
Truesdale Hospital, Inc., The (125 beds) 
Union Hospital in Fall River (150 beds) 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Fall 


$120,639 69 
500,659 14 

205,664 58 
826,124 88 
672,511 41 


$84,024 00 
2.000 00 


$770 11 
15,724 57 

29,258 02 

56,564 21 


$55,272 40 
55,055 23 

9,220 11 
152.229 02 
120.896 03 




River ....... 


7,168 48 


- 


611 86 


81 44 


7 


Young Men's Christian Association of Fall 












River ....... 


375,049 81 


- 


9,075 95 


27,273 22 


8 
9 


Falmouth 
Falmouth Nursing Association, Incorporated 
Lawrence High School Scholarship Associa- 
tion, Inc. of Falmouth, Mass., The . 


29,848 42 
2,585 82 


- 


2,228 48 
996 00 


9,172 47 


li) 
11 
12 


FlTCHBURG 

Burbank Hospital (200 beds) 

Family Welfare Association of Fitchburg, The 

Fitchburg Helping Hand Association 


• 

1,022,839 50 
18,856 57 
69,572 56 


- 


1,117 15 

10,395 18 

1,204 58 


192,553 85 

299 06 

16,970 97 


13 


Fitchburg Home for Old Ladies . 


210,742 71 


_ 


- 


2,240 47 


N 
15 

16 


New England French American Home . 
Northern Worcester County Public Health 
Association, Inc. ..... 

Visiting Nursing Association of Fitchburg, The 


13,606 10 
23,111 87 


4,500 00 


1,831 35 

_3 

6,292 15 


750 50 

_3 

6,873 16 


17 


Wachusett Children's Aid Society 


45,849 86 


- 


5,044 18 


8,772 44 


IS 


Young Mens Christian Association of Fitchburg 

FOXBOROUGH 


196,103 02 


39,574 00 


20,529 22 


4,363 34 


19 


Doolittle Universalist Home for Aged Persons, 
Inc. ....... 


56,394 87 


_ 


17,818 78 


~ 


20 


E. E. Knapp Camp Association, Inc., The 1 . 
Framingham 










21 


All Souls Lend A Hand Club, Inc. 


17,679 27 


- 


7,189 69 




22 


Framingham Civic League, Inc. . 


165,057 89 


15,395 00 


5,161 75 


3,069 27 


23 

24 
25 

2* 


Framingham Hospital (75 beds) l 
Framingham Union Hospital, Inc., The 1 
Home for Aged Men and Women in Framing- 
ham ....... 

Russian and Eastern European Mission : 


105,237 70 


- 


17,923 78 


879 40 


27 


Southwestern Middlesex Public Health Asso- 
ciation, Inc. ...... 


8,379 18 


2,100 00 


55 00 


6,114 93 


2s 
29 


Union Avenue Hospital Inc. (70 beds) * . 
Union Avenue Hospital Nurses' Alumnae 
Association, Inc. 1 ..... 










:>,a 


Franklin 
Frances Eddy King Student Fund, Inc., The 


785 48 


_ 


633 00 


- 


31 


Young Men's Christian Association of Frank- 
lin, The 


32,953 67 


9,450 00 


3,480 18 


1,058 47 


32 


Gardner 
Gardner Home for Elderly People, The . 


74,618 58 


. 


_ 


446 69 


33 


Henry Hey wood Memorial Hospital, The (96 
beds) 


1,243,940 27 


- 


18,015 75 


80.766 01 


34 


Georgetown 

Carleton Home, Trustees of the . 


41,568 18 


- 


17 48 


100 00 


35 


Gloucester 
Addison Gilbert Hospital, The (50 beds) 


634,895 74 


_ 


53,130 21 


56,485 62 | 


36 


Annisquam Association, Inc. 


11,073 71 


- 


160 00 


161 10 


37 


Associated Charities of Gloucester, The 


26,107 48 


- 


297 00 


16 50 ; 


38 


Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons, 
The 


108,710 14 


- 


- 


727 33 1 



None. 



No report. 



3 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II 

Charitable Corporations 



97 



Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$5,300 00 ^ 



2,000 00 



1,000 00 



2,000 00 



500 00 4 



1,400 00 



2,111 75 
600 00 ^ 

1,000 OO 4 
20,190 00 4 



$57,559 51 
79,818 86 


38,734 62 
153,945 47 

187,188 81 


1,041 18 


36.349 17 


11,400.95 


1,040 60 


207,824 41 
13,653 97 
18,175 '55 


14,608 48 


2,990 35 


_3 

14,209 76 


17,639 09 


33,052 81 



14,457 72 


4,931 81 


18,113 47 


22,568 05 


6,194 67 


649 15 


6,863 29 


9,516 42 


135,125 11 


2,470 96 


76,336 41 


1,805 35 


1,744 91 


5,105 37 



$61,772 04 
54,537 25 

38,190 98 
163,935 98 
172,501 81 

1,160 25 

42,430 39 

10,137 82 
735 30 



207,796 32 
11,881 00 
18,383 02 

11,334 14 

2,926 55 

4,852 86 
15,207 71 

16,920 10 

35,380 83 



12,080 14 



4,207 97 
17,455 60 



8,857 16 



5,989 24 



7,284 14 

5,312 55 
128,315 19 

3,085 45 

74,750 45 
1,733 72 

1,649 68 
4,585 15 



$10,290 43 

4,194 00 
71,149 16 
76,354 24 



7,834 50 



87,447 20 
3,669 00 
5,590 55 

4,328 90 

452 50 

1,570 50 
12,164 11 

4,285 81 

16,903 21 



3,057 10 



9,312 03 



3,464 00 



3,833 89 

1,512 85 
63,330 54 

1,277 43 

38,792 08 
430 00 

518 84 
2,181 10 



76 



os 



33 
3 

15 

1 

2^ 
3 



1,821 
878 



4,247 
520 

} » 

41 

115 
2,426 
/ 122 

1 91 



12 



7 
1,951 



2,295 

3' 

300 



395 



149 105 

2,426 178 

5,869 3,613 

1 4 2 

158 



1,306 



114 
862 



23 



is; 



4 Restricted to capital. 



c Paid officers 



98 



P. D. 17. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 


Incum- 
brances on 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 
and 






reported 


Real Estate 


Refunds 




Gloucester — Con. 










1 


Gloucester District Nursing Association 


$11,574 53 


- 


$2,637 11 


$3,937 50 


2 


Gloucester Female Charitable Association 


73,324 49 


- 


17 00 


_ 


3 


Gloucester Fishermen's Institute . 


131,329 86 


_ 


3,543 50 


8,569 97 


4 


Gloucester Fishermen's and Seamen's Widows 












and Orphans Aid Society .... 


75,309 79 


- 


95 00 


_ 


5 


Gloucester Hebrew Ladies Aid Association, Inc. 


818 47 


- 


327 55 


246 95 


6 


Huntress Home ...... 


60,305 86 


- 


4,000 00 


_ 


7 


Women's Clubhouse Association of Magnolia 1 










8 


Young Men's Christian Association of Glouces- 












ter, Mass. ...... 


201,704 13 


$13,750 00 


17,829 50 


12,926 74 




Great Barrington 










9 


Fairview Hospital (50 beds) 


483,585 39 


- 


75,987 86 


26,020 25 


10 


Visiting Nurse Association of Great Barring- 












ton, Mass., The ..... 


27,143 01 


- 


7,649 99 


3,967 52 


11 


William J. Gould Associates, Inc., The . 
Greenfield 


116,523 84 


29,500 00 


7,573 44 


10,380 63 


12 


Franklin County Public Hospital, The (100 












beds) ....... 


390,918 55 


7,000 00 


23,707 57 


74,599 06 


13 


Girls' Club of Greenfield, Massachusetts, The 


2,872 43 


- 


3,103 86 


481 06 


14 


Greenfield Health Camp, Inc. 


5,285 86 


- 


2,766 90 




15 


Greenfield Society for the Protection of Ani- 












mals, The 


1,397 51 


- 


79 50 


_ 


16 


Greenfield Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., The 


9,015 73 


- 


1,627 36 


6,820 90 


17 


Home for the Aged People of Franklin County l 
Hamilton 










J 8 


Community Service of Hamilton and Wenham, 












Incorporated ...... 


1,788 42 


- 


1,335 00 


1,157 53 




Hanson 










19 


Massachusetts Branch of the International 
Order of The King's Daughters and Sons, 












The (Gordon Rest) 


21,297 47 


- 


949 03 


2,719 38 




Harwich 










20 


Harwich Visiting Nurse Association Incorpo- 












rated ....... 


1,783 97 


- 


2,407 60 


515 73 




Haverhill 










21 


Animal Rescue League of Haverhill, Massa- 
chusetts, Inc., The 1 ..... 










22 


Citizens' Firemen's Relief Fund of Haverhill, 












Inc 


9,075 16 


- 


35 00 


_ 


23 


Esodia Theotokou Scalohoriton Lesvou, Inc. 1 










24 


Family Welfare Society of Haverhill 


7,103 34 


- 


2,691 45 


143 92 


25 


General Gale Hospital Aid Association . 


2,705 35 


- 


72 45 


3 90 


26 


Hale Hospital, The (123 beds) 


343,945 09 


- 


6,096 75 


84,947 90 


27 


Haverhill Boys Club Association . 


129,625 93 


1,200 00 


4,741 56 


700 85 


28 


Haverhill Children's Aid Society . 


134,245 76 


- 


797 90 


657 62 


29 


Haverhill College Club, (Incorporated) . 


1,352 06 


- 


208 00 


542 63 


30 


Haverhill Day Nursery Association 


35,578 34 


- 


1,735 26 


1,170 65 


31 


Haverhill Female Benevolent Society 


121,703 01 


- 


37 50 


- 


32 


Haverhill Hebrew Sheltering Home, Inc. 7 


3,059 92 


1,600 00 


788 71 


_ 


33 


Haverhill Master House Painters and Decora- 












tors Association ..... 


135 24 


- 


51 00 


120 00 


34 


Haverhill Teachers' Association, Incorporated 


2,756 72 


- 


810 00 


740 79 


35 


Haverhill Union Mission, Inc. 


13,720 98 


- 


898 98 


27 71 


36 


Haverhill Young Men's Christian Association 


118,785 39 


6,500 00 


5,355 75 


2,846 25 


37 


Haverhill Young Women's Christian Associa- 












tion ....... 


31,754 24 


- 


3,937 99 


2,883 01 


38 


Linwood O. Towne Scholarship Association, 












The 


3,007 72 


- 


- 


740 00 


39 


Mary F. Ames Convalescents' Home, Inc., The 


118,652 09 


- 


_ 


- 


4(1 


Massachusetts Pythian Sisters' Home Associa- 












tion, The ...... 


27,584 97 


- 


2,940 97 


21 16 


41 


Old Ladies Home Association 


237,778 13 


~ 


987 50 


2,305 22 



None. 



1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



ft. II. 




















99 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 












Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 

Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$421 69 


$500 00^ 


$6,996 30 


$6,330 75 


$5,211 92 




4 


18 




9 


525 


1 


3,068 67 


- 


3,085 67 


2,933 93 


325 00 


1 


l 5 

1 


J2 
_3 


} 


_3 


50 


2 


4,047 17 


7,392 00 


23,613 37 


12,621 30 


7,392 00 




5 


100,000 6 


_3 


- 


3 


3,815 69 
16 38 


f 


3,910 69 

590 88 


4,398 77 
606 54 


297 90 




_3 


_3 




_3 


-3 
-3 


4 
5 


2,479 27 


- 


6,479 27 


5,480 29 


2,341 88 


1 


1& 

3 


} 7 




7 


~ 


6 

7 


3,096 04 


10,384 00 4 


33,852 28 


33,890 24 


17,004 93 




13 


f 452 

\ 6,500 


} 


3,500 


" 


8 


7,209 78 


3,000 00 4 


35,517 37 


30,473 20 


15,850 53 




28 


830 




76 


- 


9 


2,428 35 


- 


14,045 86 


11,738 93 


8,182 21 




5 


794 




413 


_ 


10 


1,090 00 


25,000 00 


44,044 07 


28,074 49 


5,348 13 


{ 


2& 
8 


l 2 
221 


I 
J 


47 


- 


11 


5,435 15 
172 02 
20 16 


500 00 4 


92,660 30 
3,756 94 
2,787 06 


98,000 97 
2,940 80 
2,950 41 


39,378 33 

2,079 40 

920 00 




36 
19 

8 


1,415 
280 
105 




49 
105 


: 


12 

13 

14 


27 44 
. 365 48 


- 


106 94 

8,813 74 


71 00 
9,504 39 


6,758 61 




4 


1,182 




121 


653 


15 

16 
17 


209 54 


- 


2,965 62 


2,967 46 


1,850 00 




2 


/ 31 2 
\ 2,000 


} 


1,000 


- 


18 


128 03 


- 


3,815 42 


3,804 47 


1,134 00 


i 


2& 
8 


42 
150 


} 


15 


-3 


19 


76 85 


- 


3,000 18 


2,901 70 


1,920 42 




1 


184 




51 


102 


20 


426 02 


_ 


461 02 


625 00 


_ 






11 








21 
22 


356 66 


- 


3,194 17 


3,701 36 


1,988 35 




2 


- 




_ 


238 


23 
24 


58 64 


200 00 


334 99 


150 09 


- 




- 


f 22 

1 60 
1,405 
1,200 


} 


-3 


66 


25 


3,849 77 
3,242 54 


5,000 00 
9,000 00 


99,894 42 
17,684 95 


108,203 41 

8,483 16 


46,945 02 
5,843 00 




48 
6 


19 


- 


26 

'27 


6,120 32 


- 


7,575 84 


6,625 21 


1,613 30 


{ 


15 

2 


12 

575 


} 


566 


78 


28 


67 02 
1,350 11 


1,102 00 


817 65 
5,358 02 


1,334 48 
3,891 11 


1,934 62 


4 


3 

78 


3 


58 


29 

30 


5,895 11 


- 


5,932 61 


3,917 19 


785 00 




35 


J 6 2 
\ 20 
40 


} 


20 


77 


31 


- 


- 


788 71 


428 79 


- 




- 


40 


- 


32 


221 50 

103 01 

3,542 83 


- 


392 50 

1,653 80 

4,469 52 

15,962 50 


345 60 

1,425 32 
4,376 34 
15,489 57 


1,433 85 
7,275 00 




3 

6 


1 

419 
432 




1 
381 


: 


33 
34 
3.S 
30 


1,842 89 


- 


8,702 40 


8,774 55 


5,362 14 




5 


607 




86 


- 


37 


51 22 


- 


791 22 


13 17 


- 




- 


1 




1 


_. 


3& 


4,027 04 


- 


4,027 04 


1,993 99 


250 00 




15 


- 




- 


- 


39; 


850 75 


- 


3,812 88 


4,585 32 


939 75 




1 


5 




5 


_ 


40 


11,415 17 


/ 500 00 4 
I 6,031 08 


} 20,738 97 


13,520 87 


6,542 55 


{ 


15 

8 


1 - 




23 


- 


4L 


4 Res 


Lricted to capitc 


il. *P 


aid officers. 


6 Visits. 






7 Report fc 


r S 


month 







100 



P. D. 17. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Haverhill— Con. . 

Progressive Society of Kalloniaton, Ansbe, 

Haverhill, Mass., The 1 . • • 

Sarah A. White Home for Aged Men, the 
Social Circle of the Portland Street Church. The 

H INGHAM 

Hingham Memorial Hospital. Inc., The 
Hingham Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

HOLDEN 

Holden District Hospital Inc. (26 beds) 

Holyoke 
Holyoke Boys' Club Association, The 
Holyoke Day Nursery, Incorporated 
Holyoke Family Welfare Society, Inc. 
Holyoke Hebrew Free Loan Society 
Holyoke Home for Aged People . 
Holyoke Home Information Center, lnc 

Holyoke Hospital (150 beds) 
Holyoke Junior Achievement Foundation, Inc. 
Holyoke Society for the Care of Crippled Chil- 
dren, Inc. • • ■ . ■ T ' 
Holyoke Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. . 

Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association, 
The .••••■ 

Ladies Hebrew Free Loan Society . • 

Sisters of Providence (Beaven-kelly Home) 

Sisters of Providence (Bnghtside Orphans 
and Bethlehem Homes) . • • 

Sisters of Providence (House of Providence 
Hospital and Father Harkins Home for Aged 
Women) (140 beds) . - • ■ ■ 

Sisters of Providence (Mt. St. Vincent Home 
for Girls) • • • , 

Skinner Coffee House, Incorporated . 

United Hebrew Charities of Holyoke, Inc. . 

White Cross Association for Graduate Nurses 
of Holyoke, Mass 

Young Women's Christian Association of Holy- 
oke, The 

Hoped ale 
Hopedale Community House, Inc. 

Hudson 
Hudson Community Health Association, In- 
corporated ..•••• 

Hull 
Father Andrew O'Brien Memorial Association, 
Inc., of Hull ..•••• 
Ipswich 
Coburn Charitable Society . 
Ipswich Hospital (operating Benjamin Stick- 
ney Cable Memorial Hospital) (25 beds) . . 

Lancaster 
Charitable Fund in the Town of Lancaster, 

Trustees of the . • . . • 

Lancaster Social Service Association 
Nathaniel Thayer Playground Association . 

Lawrence 
Asrath Noshim 7 ... 

Cardinal Gibbons Club . 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



$131,225 54 
66 58 



8,790 89 

65,343 66 

127.591 53 

64,207 09 

30 60 

4,541 33 

245,262 71 
2,317 82 

692,597 21 
232 52 



15 32 

121 66 



367,190 51 

442 64 
70,282 03 

176,041 16 



176,319 78 

77,722 08 

160,632 74 

643 10 

3,076 74 

125,726 06 

207,263 57 

1,315 86 

17,170 65 

226,965 92 
204,655 43 



14,289 43 

21,312 68 

41 62 



3,000 27 



$23,500 00 



9,150 00 
10,000 00 



85,000 00 



,000 00 



$88 50 



1,584 78 

5,579 17 

8,900 00 

15,875 00 

12,461 23 

765 81 

2,194 65 
13,553 03 

41,937 27 
7,944 64 

8,638 00 

34,061 18 

124 30 
1,166 37 

4,367 29 

939 28 

2,940 25 
16,250 00 

1,133 25 

16 00 

12,722 00 



5,737 50 



1,033 48 



99 00 



7,299 55 



1,477 41 
1,779 36 



83 00 



None. 



i No report. 



; Organizations aided, 



3 Not stated. 



i Restricted to capital. 



Ipt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



101 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


^uS Total 

° f E P m aid viduals 
ployees aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 

Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$7,056 12 


_ 


$7,056 12 
326 96 


$501 00 
601 71 


$312 00 


3' 




_ 3 
_3 


_3 

_3 


la 


1 

2 

3 


45 18 


- 


3,303 50 


3,335 04 


1,864 77 


1 




313 


30 


- 


4 
5 


931 06 


- 


43,597 51 


43,492 37 


15,609 66 


12 




749 


87 


- 


6 


670 06 


_ 


10,959 62 


10.948 05 


7,557 25 


15 




990 


70 


_ 


7 


- 


- 


17,097 91 


16,096 12 


5,719 40 


15 


J 


52 
1,542 


} 1,192 


147 


8 


- 


- 


12,559 20 


13,390 78 


5,385 00 


4 




1,388 


1,388 


248 


9 


- 


- 


13,081 31 


14,234 33 


18 75 


1* 


| 


22 

57 


} 57 


- 


10 


8,148 56 
30 92 


$4,750 004 


12,536 00 
14,180 42 


13,743 47 
12,164 84 


5,605 00 
9,393 75 


7 
10 




25 
1,322 


25 
1,322 


: 


11 

12 


15,409 85 


j 135,j60 00 4 
1 140,200 00 


} 295,728 14 


156,616 13 


65,184 62 


63 




3,768 


1,077 


- 


13 


4 50 


- 


8,165 21 


9,065 54 


7,673 25 


5 


J 


62 
834 


} 187 


- 


14 


2,450 00 


- 


3,054 00 
16,529 56 


3,099 94 
16,543 37 


1,324 99 
14,868 42 


1 
9 




311 
2,647 


233 

_3 


- 


15 


26,885 79 

7 65 


- 


70,374 64 

522 05 
24,532 58 


68,109 59 

600 93 
24,335 16 


27,754 63 
2,935 70 


/ 1* 
I 14 

9 




412 

5,982 

16 

86 


} 4,364 

16 
2 


- 


17 

IS 
19 


5 65 


3,384 07 


43,829 33 


43,594 11 


9,904 75 


18 




338 


12 


- 


20 


292 87 


- 


123.991 62 


127,281 55 


31,927 66 


59 




4,451 


351 


- 


21 


14 35 
3,354 17 


6,190 00 


34,182 24 
19,963 91 


33,887 20 
20,025 13 


6,309 54 
10,651 04 


9 
14 




186 
3,326 


3 
665 

} - 


- 


22 

23 


- 


- 


1,133 25 


973 20 


- 


- 


{ 


]2 

10 


5 


24 


142 33 


- 


158 33 


75 00 


- 


- 




3 


- 


- 


25 


1,812 76 


- 


28,563 10 


28,806 99 


13,758 56 


{ .r 


} 


2,000 


_ 3 


- 


26 


11,239 16 


- 


17,012 63 


13,744 78 


8,078 29 


\ 5 


} 


_3 


_3 


-3 


27 


60 70 


- 


2,267 19 


2,557 44 


1,786 33 


1 




1,932" 


_3 


_3 


28 


- 


- 


881 97 


6,856 69 


- 


- 




- 


" 


2 


29 


11,708 81 


1,349 12" 


12,571 00 


11,541 57 


3,975 00 


{ V 


} 


168 


28 


10 


30 


4,263 50 


- 


33,667 03 


31,732 07 


15,039 23 


10 




432 


6 


- 


31 


648 42 

1,174 57 


- 


648 42 
3,465 13 
2,025 86 


618 50 
2,791 43 
2,025 86 


1,929 00 
982 00 


1 

4 




13 
142 
835 


_ 3 
91 
750 


- 


32 

33 
34 


- 


- 


945 31 


681 12 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


35 
36 



5 Paid officers. 



fl Visits 



7 Name changed to Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Lawrence. 



102 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 


Lawrence — Con. 
German Old Folks' Home of Lawrence, Massa 
chusetts ..... 


$43,149 46 




$490 57 


$3,093 70 


2 
3 

4 


Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Lawrence 
Incorporated Protectory of Mary Immaculate 

The 

International Association of Y's Men's Clubs 

The 


949 91 

131,998 56 

161 54 


- 


649 75 
13,032 44 
8,728 39 


400 00 
26,636 03 
4,456 01 


5 


Lawrence Boys' Club .... 


73,837 94 


- 


10,293 73 


715 79 


6 


Lawrence City Mission 


15,605 13 


$1,600 00 


15,657 18 


1,801 69 


7 


Lawrence General Hospital (147 beds) . 


671,359 90 


- 


20,391 43 


120,363 69 


8 


Lawrence Home for Aged People, The . 


449,488 54 


- 


3,568 75 


5,736 21 


9 


Lawrence Tuberculosis League, Inc. 


20,659 10 


9,000 00 


3,753 20 


4,934 89 


10 


Lawrence Young Men's Christian Associatior 


i 235,008 51 


10,900 00 


6,777 20 


33,356 51 


11 
12 


Lawrence Young Women's Christian Associa 
tion ...... 

Patriotic Society of Habossi, Incorporated 


137,935 32 
6,013 18 


4,500 00 


21,732 49 
2,125 64 


13,850 59 


13 


Russell-Hood Trust, Incorporated 


23,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


14 

15 
16 


St. John the Baptist Orthodox Greek Catholh 

Church of Lawrence 
Syrian National Club . 
United Hebrew Ladies Free Loan Association 


3,007 12 
6,066 27 

i 


2,200 00 
3,500 00 


698 75 


2,017 28 


17 


United Syrian Society of Lawrence, Mass. 


10,761 71 


1,600 00 


787 40 


953 27 


18 


Lee 
Ascension Farm School, The Corporation of th 


J 94,256 26 


1,500 00 


12,649 75 


21,039 42 


19 


Leicester 
Leicester Samaritan Association . 

Leominster 


4,799 20 


- 


503 00 


1,000 25 


20 


Leominster Home for Old Ladies, The . 


131,805 12 


- 


- 


500 00 


21 


Leominster Hospital Association (73 beds) 


348,955 45 


52,100 00 


6,042 79 


46,336 54 


22 
23 


Lexington 
Isaac Harris Cary Educational Fund 
Lexington Home for Aged People 


226,076 21 
71,534 98 


- 


3,498 27 


625 00 
3,052 72 


24 


Lexington Public Health Association Inc. 
Lincoln 


5,149 16 




3,694 55 


613 50 


25 


Farrington Memorial, Incorporated 
Longmeadovv 


307,779 23 


" 


100 00 




26 


Doane Orphanage, The 


69,686 02 


- 


1,679 04 


1,971 95 


27 


Lowell 

L' Association Educatrice Franco-Americain 
Inc 


e 

8,546 02 


7,500 00 


747 00 




28 
29 


Ayer Home, Trustees of the 

Battles Home, The .... 


360,015 97 
99,512 82 


: 


630 00 


1,356 25 
1,213 50 


30 


Channing Fraternity . . 


9,911 35 


- 


- 


- 


31 
32 


Children's Home .... 
Faith Home ..... 


15,108 19 
30,549 69 


- 


483 86 
414 44 


1,483 23 
376 43 


33 


Florence Crittenton Rescue League of Lowe 


11 12,801 42 


- 


2,075 38 


- 


34 
35 
36 


Horn Home for Aged Couples, The 

Ladies' Gmeloos Chasodem Association, Th 

Ladies Helping Hand Society, The 


30,542 35 

e 2,663 00 

2,724 10 


1,000 00 
1,000 00 


2,372 34 

284 77 
153 75 


1,200 00 
335 00 
269 81 


37 


Lowell Association for the Blind, Inc. . 


1,537 18 


- 


344 32 


44 45 


38 


Lowell Boys Club Association 


73,862 53 


- 


8,690 20 


- 


39 


Lowell Community Chest Association, Inc. 


82,676 76 


- 


143,014 24 


- 


40 

41 


Lowell Corporation Hospital (100 beds) 
Lowell Day Nursery Association . 


149,022 02 
132,068 06 


- 


24,079 86 
215 00 


68,505 30 
862 20 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 


















103 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 








Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities, 

;and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$1,695 21 




$5,279 48 


$6,824 01 


$1,762 03 


{ * 


} 


19 






1 


- 


- 


1,049 75 


838 86 


- 






300 


300 


60 


2 


- 


$1,700 00 


41,368 47 


42,327 73 


8,798 05 


39 




298 


68 


20 


3 


67 13 


- 


13,515 03 


13,251 21 


3,586 85 


f is 

I 5 


} 


_3 


-3 


- 


4 


1,033 65 


200 00 


12,243 17 


11,588 94 


6,422 00 


7 




1,3406 


_ 3 


- 


5 


1,004 39 


- 


18,463 26 


17,036 09 


8,961 80 


/ 15 

I 6 


} 


887 


876 


525 


6 


31,092 75 


/ 2,000 004 
1 1,000 00 


1 172,404 96 


171,690 72 


72,434 04 


75 




4,354 


337 


- 


7 


14,402 79 


1,000 00 


27,626 64 


21,607 67 


6,522 75 


10 




39 


- 


- 


8 


66 02 


- 


8,754 11 


11,259 84 


3,684 50 


/ I 5 
1 19 


| 


195 


157 


- 


9 


1,393 67 


- 


42,110 39 


55,609 74 


29,169 36 


/ 85 
I 11 


} 


_ 3 


_ 3 


- 


10 


5,574 73 
791 67 


9,607 50 


51,536 65 
2,917 31 


38,735 75 
703 01 


21,631 33 


21 




32,774 
30 


8,605 

-3 


20 


11 
12 


1,035 00 


- 


1,035 00 


1,035 00 


- 


- 


/ 
I 


12 


} 


- 


13 


: 


- 


2,017 28 
698 75 


2,019 63 
673 54 


900 00 


1 




~ 


- 


- 


14 
15 
16 


328 55 


- 


2,086 62 


1,185 16 


186 65 


43 


i 
\ 


12 


} - 


3 


17 


172 54 


- 


34,053 71 


30,130 93 


7,245 12 


6 




28 


10 


- 


18 


171 84 


- 


1,675 09 


1,611 13 


799 96 


1 




247 


59 


145 


19 


6,183 40 


2,000 00^ 


6,906 86 


6,303 01 


2,848 33 


{ I* 


} 


10 


10 


_ 


20 


2,313 32 


50 00 4 


51,563 65 


46,815 79 


19.760 00 


43 


2,422 


409 


- 


21 


12,678 58 
2,822 09 


2,500 00 


13,303 58 
11,873 08 


6,251 26 
6,433 72 


300 00 
2,550 02 


1 
3 




36 

7 


36 

7 


- 


22 
23 


" 


~ 


4,308 05 


4,341 44 


2,142 00 


10 


1 

I 


162 

193 


} « 


128 


24 


10,404 20 


- 


10,504 20 


14,772 00 


4,887 53 


/ I 5 
I 9 


} 


275 


275 


- 


25 


2,544 59 


3,404 30 


9,651 92 


9,413 97 


4,115 89 


{ r 


} 


17 


3 


- 


26 


122 00 


- 


869 00 


1,135 17 




. 


{ 


32 
104 


} 60 
83 




27 


14,989 22 
3,704 72 


- 


16,345 47 
5,548 22 


16,104 30 
4,368 19 


3,955 85 
1.258 60 


ii 

2 


83 
18 


- 


28 

29 


514 93 


- 


514 93 


263 75 


- 


- 


/ 
I 


32 


1 

/ 

11 
8 


_ 


30 


67 25 

2,259 15 


- 


2,034 34 
3,050 02 


2,407 14 
3,062 48 


1,139 07 
795 00 


4 

15 


78 
16 


- 


31 
32 


788 33 


500 00 


3,411 46 


2,985 20 


1,430 00 


_3 


{ 


592 
160 


j 157 

_3 

30 

_3 


- 


33 


342 32 

34 74 


: 


3,914 66 
619 77 
458 30 


4,125 58 
701 45 
529 94 


674 86 
36 00 
22 00 


1 

]« 

15 


8 
33 

_3 


-3 
-3 


34 

35 

36 


95 35 


- 


484 12 


1,746 62 


371 00 


{ r 

3 

{ V 

32 
4 


} 


141 


_ 


- 


37 


1,839 04 


- 


8,690 20 
144,853 28 


8,585 03 
140,805 19 


6,132 00 
5,460 00 


_3 
132 


_ 3 

} - 

_3 
5 


~ 


3S 
30 


144 13 
5,735 76 


: 


93,198 20 
6,812 96 


93,336 58 
5,240 35 


31,283 02 
1,695 00 




8,786 
122 


2 


40 

11 



* Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



6 Membership. 



104 



P. D. 17. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 





. 


Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 




Lowell — Con. 










1 


Lowell Dispensary ..... 


$6,268 56 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Lowell General Hospital, The (155 beds) 


1,743,232 97 


- 


- 


$86,140 34 


3 


Lowell Good Will Industries, Inc., The . 


474 24 


- 


$2,787 85 


90,062 68 


4 
5 


Lowell Greek Charitable Association, Inc., The 
Lowell Hebrew Community Center, Inc. 


75,590 63 


$16,700 00 


181 00 

4,555 00 


23 97 

3,446 15 


6 


Lowell Humane Society, The 


50,493 44 


- 


1,017 00 


576 10 


7 

8 
9 


Lowell Particular Council of the Society of St. 
Vincent de Paul ..... 
Lowell Social Service League, Inc. 
Lowell Visiting Nurse Association 


972 40 

32 20 

11,403 04 


- 


575 03 

9,714 20 
852 00 


3,237 65 
34,734 89 


10 


Lowell Young Men's Christian Association 


399,452 55 


- 


23,871 45 


28,589 82 


11 
12 
13 
14 

15 

16 
17 


Ministry-at- Large in Lowell 
Old Ladies' Home ..... 
L'Orphelinat Franco-Americain 
Phileducational Association of Georgitsiotes, 

"Socrates" ...... 

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston (St. 

Peter's Orphan Asylum) .... 
Saint John's Hospital (157 beds) . 
Young Women's Christian Association of 

Lowell ....... 


89,745 92 
327,071 93 
205,139 31 

19,483 25 

101,634 70 
412,583 51 

162,579 86 


-3 


448 96 

341 00 

27,113 37 

2,738 44 
6,250 60 

18,023 75 


5,600 00 

10,771 27 
104,526 59 

36,270 16 


18 


Ludlow 

Ludlow Hospital Society (29 beds) 


28,689 52 


- 


3,524 47 


14,134 38 


19 
20 
21 


Lynn 
Aid Society of the Lynn Day Nursery, The . 
Associated Charities of Lynn, The 
Boys' Club of Lynn ..... 


33,630 80 
39,941 88 
44,111 11 


- 


13,797 50 

21,100 80 

5,054 12 


12,166 37 
138 55 


22 


Camp Rotary, Inc., of Lynn, Mass. 


18,064 23 


- 


- 


1,303 00 


23 


Columbus Guild of Lynn .... 


27,206 48 


4,500 00 


1,037 00 


5,029 04 


24 


Eliza J. Hahn Home for Aged Couples . 


88,823 41 


- 


61 00 


- 


25 


Greek Women's Aid Society of Lynn, Mass. 


207 47 


- 


28 00 


978 11 


26 

27 
28 

29 
30 
31 

32 


Harris Goldman Charity Fund, Inc., The 
Jewish Associated Charities of Lynn, The : 
J. Fergus Gifford Shoe and Stocking Fund of 

the Lynn Rotary Club, Inc. 
Junior Aid Society, Inc. .... 
Lynn Association for the Blind, Inc. 1 . 
Lynn Hebrew Ladies' Helping-Hand Society, 

The 

Lynn Home for Aged Men .... 


25,000 00 

1,061 05 
852 92 

237,011 66 


- 


1,372 28 
1,139 60 

316 92 
10 00 


1,131 21 
4,879 30 


33 


Lynn Home for Aged Women 6 


424,506 65 


- 


2,767 38 


1,406 50 


34 


Lynn Home for Children .... 


54,250 88 


- 


470 46 


- 


35 


Lynn Home for Young Women 


103,455 33 


- 


282 00 


6,623 67 


36 
37 

38 

39 


Lynn Hospital (157 beds) .... 
Lynn Jewish Orphans Relief Association, The l 
Lynn Tuberculosis League . 
Lynn Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. . 


1,269,104 21 

1,335 90 
10,701 64 


16,500 00 


18,678 34 

2,258 60 
7,276 82 


181,788 48 
8,829 80 


40 


Mirabeau Fresh Air Camp, Inc. . 


1,200 84 


400 00 


1,583 32 


47 93 


41 


Neighborhood House Association . 


23,495 94 


- 


7,579 19 


2,046 83 


42 


Pullman Mission ..... 


49,154 82 


- 


1,283 61 


2,089 34 


43 


Union Hospital (90 beds) .... 


63,350 00 


15,000 00 


7,497 50 


75,137 36 


44 


Welfare Federation of Lynn, Inc. 


1,142 05 


- 


186,323 42 


- 


45 
46 


Women's Union for Christian Work incorpo- 
rated at Lynn ..... 
Young Men's Christian Association of Lynn . 


458,758 32 


137,750 00 


42,000 00 


46.455 37 


47 


Malden 
Adelaide Breed Bayrd Foundation, The 


31,381 18 








48 

4'. 


Associated Charities of Maiden, The 

Girls' Club Association of Maiden, Inc., The 1 


49,217 26 




940 00 





None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



I II. 

haritable Corporations — Continued. 



105 



Interest, 
dividends, 
Annuities, 
nd Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$274 44 




$274 44 


$180 22 






/ l 2 


} 


_3 


_3 


1 


i 69,872 12 


$5,000 00 


164,894 31 


107,737 55 


$41,494 58 


45 


3,178 


152 


- 


2 


- 


- 


22,850 53 


22,759 30 


18,391 40 


24 


/ 52 
I 56 


} 


- 


- 


3 


- 


_ 


204 97 


313 54 


_ 


_ 




_ 


35 


4 


520 00 


- 


8,570 84 


9,734 92 


4,803 35 


4 


-3 




_3 


_3 


5 


J 4,265 95 


/ 100 00 4 
I 305 63 


} 6,191 73 


7,158 59 


4,726 75 


4 


f 122 

I 136 




136 


47 


6 


42 79 


_ 


617 82 


352 59 


_ 


_ 


4,187 




4,187 


742 


7 


— 


— 


12,951 85 


12,971 96 


4,814 00 


3 


- 




- 


418 


8 


- 


- 


34,786 89 


35,130 99 


29,035 15 


22 


5,336 




1,224 


_3 


9 


3,554 26 


- 


56,356 77 


56,471 77 


23,882 22 


19 


I 40 2 
I 4,473 


} 


2,500 


- 10 


3,878 29 


500 00< 


4,327 25 


4,188 85 


1,265 81 


1 


2 




2 


31 


11 


. 12,561 46 


8,184 81 


26,687 27 


15,171 64 


5,202 00 


9 


43 




- 


- 


12 


367 88 




33,617 74 


36,194 93 


8,962 00 


36 


238 




47 




i; j 


_ 




13,509 71 


14,301 31 


3,536 00 


11 


113 




9 


_ 


\z 


380 87 


13,852 74 


120,010 80 


104,349 18 


35,071 98 


57 


5,787 




2,641 


~ 


\b 


8,038 16 


- 


62,332 07 


62,302 23 


29,468 02 


36 


81,434 




4,168 


- 


17 


12 13 


209 00 


18,392 02 


19,805 13 


10,630 55 


14 


445 




- 


- 


18 


1,140 78 


1,000 00« 


27,104 65 


28,059 88 


7,880 23 


6 


195 




31 


_ 


19 


2,412 35 


- 


21,077 36 


22,885 41 


5,544 94 


4 






- 


728 


2< 


3,341 03 


- 


8,593 57 


9,722 73 


6,000 00 


10 


550 




150 


- 


21 


2 73 


- 


1,303 00 


1,532 47 


- 


- 


1 l 2 

I 45 


} 


45 


- 


22 


- 


6,101 64 


6,090 12 


1,951 40 


3 


165 




15 


85 


23 


5,503 09 


500 00 


6,064 09 


5,424 44 


2,559 24 


I 3 


} " 




12 


- 


24 


- 


- 


1,006 11 


892 08 


_ 


_ 


{ v 

_3 


! 


_ 


25 


2£ 


750 00 


- 


750 00 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


_3 


2f 

27 


3 23 


_ 


1,197 28 


1,190 62 






614 




614 


207 


2^ 




2,324 04 


2,903 70 


- 


- 








_3 


29 
3C 


- 


_ 


316 92 


60 00 






40 




40 


20 


31 


12,506 05 


1,181 29 


18,576 64 


9,344 84 


2,217 40 


4 


14 








32 


20,877 46 


50 00 


25,146 60 


13,830 66 


4,273 70 


/ 1B 

1 6 
2 


} 36 
35 




35 


- 


33 


2,787 36 


- 


3,257 82 


3,168 96 


_3 




7 


_ 


34 


5,767 03 


- 


12,672 70 


16,587 99 


5,456 10 


J ' I* 

I 8 
95 


122 

3,235 

4,387 


} 


1,623 


35 


35 


20,817 57 


8,945 00 


230,219 39 


227,614 38 


92,818 98 


518 


- 


:m 


20 81 
516 55 


- 


2,279 41 


3,376 62 


2,612 50 


2 


772 




772 


568 


37 

;-;s 


_ 


16,623 17 


16,849 00 


14,281 55 


12 


2,074 




183 


-3 


39 


~ 


- 


1,631 25 


1,650 94 


345 10 


3 


/ 62 

1 181 


! 


181 


— 3 


40 


787 61 


250 00 


10,663 63 


10,778 40 


5,668 00 


/ 1 B 
1 23 


j 1,105 

/ 112 

I H 
1,945 




405 


40 


41 


2,401 81 


- 


5,774 76 


4,583 86 


- 




} 


14 


5 


42 


~ 


- 


82,634 86 


86,742 80 


27,518 71 


31 


265 


- 


43 


385 48 


- 


181,708 90 


193,381 73 


11,576 60 


/ 16 

1 4 


222 


} 


- 


- 


44 


15,468 53 


225 00 4 


104,796 69 


99,329 87 


46,868 12 


35 


_3 




_3 


- 


45 
41 


1,896 91 


- 


1,896 91 


1,255 00 






f 152 

356 


} 






4 7 


2,615 96 




3,586 80 


3,518 41 


2,785 87 


"' 


_3 


-3 


48 

41 



4 Restricted to capital. 



1 Paid officers. 



6 Report for 11 months. 



106 



P. D. 171 

Abstracts of Reports of Privately 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 

Refunds 


1 


Malden — Con. 
Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women, 
Inc., The ...... 


$39,606 17 


$13,000 00 


$6,196 79 


$15,993 30 1 


2 


Maiden Anti-Tuberculosis Society Incorpo- 
rated, The 


4,777 65 


- 


94 00 


- 


3 


Maiden Arbeiter Ferein, Inc. 


554 61 


_ 


186 75 


466 68 , 


4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


Maiden Hebrew Free Loan Association, The l 
Maiden High School Scholarship, Inc. . 
Maiden Home for Aged Persons, The 
Maiden Hospital, The (118 beds) 
Maiden Industrial Aid Society, The 
Maiden Young Men's Christian Association, 
The 


10,471 16 
242,314 46 
542,620 00 
130,543 45 

290,703 35 


808 29 


98 32 

4,957 25 
1,045 05 
1,493 01 

12,550 40 


2,921 30 

113,374 40 

2,099 35 

24,621 21 


10 


Monday Club of Maiden, The 


4,956 42 


- 


626 02 


440 50 


11 


Young Men's Hebrew Association of Maiden 1 










12 


Young Women's Christian Association of 
Maiden . . 


33,380 79 


- 


4,234 94 




13 


Mansfield 

Mansfield Visiting Nurse Association 


2,242 51 


_ 


951 85 


1,786 99 


14 
15 


Marblehead 
Marblehead Female Humane Society . 
Marblehead Visiting Nurse Association 


77,839 61 
20,102 10 


- 


7,844 04 
1,387 66 


454 30 


16 


Young Men's Christian Association of Marble- 
head, The ...... 

Marlborough 


62,645 92 


- 


4,734 00 


885 20 


17 


Hillside School 


151,148 49 


27,000 00 


29,509 20 


21,313 52 


18 

19 


Marlborough Community Service, Inc. J 
Marlborough Hospital (76 beds) . 


184,995 17 


57,900 00 


636 36 


46,808 82 


20 


Marlborough Woman's Club 


3,151 61 


- 


2,550 23 


1,234 90 


21 


Unitarian Ladies' Charitable Society 


6,743 26 


- 


419 21 


1,153 93 


22 


Marshfield 
Nathaniel Taylor Fund Inc. 


7,291 38 


_ 


367 48 


17 50 


23 


Maynard 
Russian Educational Society of Maynard, Inc., 
The 


14,029 79 


12,607 00 


246 20 


- 


21 


Medford 

Lawrence Memorial Hospital of Medford (105 

beds) ....... 


796,685 50 




1,105 00 


115,171 40 


25 


Medford Home for Aged Men and Women 


166.655 01 


- 


4,222 04 


350 00 


26 

27 


Medford Visiting Nurse Association 
Sarah Fuller Home for Little Deaf Children, 
The 


21,117 18 
182,448 98 


— 


21,288 10 
2,520 00 


5,457 72 


2:s 
29 
30 


Melrose 
Fitch Home, Inc., The 

Melrose High School Scholarship, Incorporated * 
Melrose Hospital Association (120 beds) 


364,835 60 
394,828 37 


- 


1,882 00 
5,372 60 


5,051 92 
146,465 78 


31 


Mendon 
Resthaven Association, Inc., The 


345 51 


- 


313 72 


- 


32 


Methuen 
Arlington Day Nursery and Children's Tem- 
porary Home, The ..... 


6,171 98 




5,398 87 


: 


33 


Henry C. Nevins Home for the Aged and In- 
curable ....... 

MlDDLEBOROUGH 


243,799 99 


- 


2,165 00 


3,941 86 


34 


Fall Brook Mothers' Club, Inc. . 


5,106 12 


1,200 00 


36 90 


542 70 


35 
36 


Montgomery Home for Aged People 

St. Luke's Hospital of Middleborough ( 16 beds) 


128,724 65 
114,035 12 


: 


285 07 
1,952 25 


9,041 96 



None. 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



t. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



107 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$111 50 
118 57 



510 28 
9,213 86 
14,500 32 
4,375 52 

3,193 47 
257 03 



43 09 



3,123 67 
1,103 51 



1,032 82 



65 33 

95 14 
107 03 

287 83 



335 22 

53 00 

18,071 40 

5,509 56 

273 82 

9,699 38 

14,674 47 
10,298 63 

11 59 

49 27 
3,318 75 



7 41 

6,529 30 
3,572 65 



127 47 
10,000 00 



50 00 



27,687 56 4 



9,776 514 
150 00 



1,308 05 
2,056 16 

1,000 00 



500 00 



10,000 00* 

35,000 004 

1,000 00 



1,541 56 
7,461 16 4 



36,000 00 



200 00 



$20,748 86 


1,695 86 


653 43 


608 60 

17,219 88 

139,885 54 

7,967 88 


40,365 08 


1,373 55 


4,086 46 


2,781 93 


5,665 37 
3,095 47 


9,101 83 


55,245 60 


49,596 48 


3,892 16 


2,860 97 


1,225 55 


299 20 


135,074 59 


11,081 60 


7,023 73 


9,719 38 


23,083 95 


162,137 01 


325 31 


6,221 76 


45,465 11 


587 01 


6,814 37 
14,966 86 



$14,137 02 


1,341 47 


344 86 


610 00 

15,655 51 

178,087 40 

6,274 45 


41,266 60 


1,407 63 


4,198 00 


2,833 32 


5,331 46 

2,875 84 


8,711 79 


43,405 72 


50,043 43 


3,060 02 


2,104 78 


654 02 


320 10 


111,130 80 


8,423 50 


7,180 32 


7,180 59 


17,009 12 


161,193 04 


117 75 


6,018 33 


41,603 22 


253 88 


6,561 03 
15,011 74 



$4,346 32 




5 


770 00 




15 


30 00 




15 


5,759 63 

75,571 07 

3,157 50 




8 

68 

5 


18,082 63 




13 


794 50 




3 


1,752 50 


/ 
I 


15 

1 


1,715 93 




3 


1,543 25 
1,822 63 




3 

1 


5,122 73 


/ 
I 


15 

4 


17,417 59 


/ 

I 


25 

8 


17,140 31 




18 


1,350 00 




1 


116 24 




4 


48,570 00 




47 


1,770 00 




4 


5,615 57 




4 


6,620 59 




3 


4,49.1 83 




6 


_3 




44 


10 00 




1 


2,405 76 




5 


15,753 95 


/ 

I 


15 

24 


1,820 00 
100 00 




2 
9 



29 

2.748 



1.010 6 

/ 2 

1 154 



2.24H 



18 

278 



412 
1,115 



1,561 

6 2 

399 

24 

15 



3,171 

14 



32 
5,033 



9 

267 



18 
265 



273 
14 

24 

29 
558 



4 Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



8 Membership. 



7 Visits. 



108 








j 

P. D. Vi 






Abstracts of Reports of Privaii 






Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


i 


MlDDLEBOROUGH Con. 

Young Men's Christian Association of Mid- 
dleborough, The ..... 


$65,458 74 


$9,600 00 


$4,549 93 


$ 2.0C7 3/ 


2 
3 

4 


MlLFORD 

Home for the Aged at Milford, The 
Milford-Hopedale-Mendon Instructive Dis- 
trict Nursing Association .... 
Milford Hospital (55 beds) .... 


12,535 94 

13,074 90 
474,381 22 


- 


5,512 00 
10 00 


6,858 49 I 
60,318 81' 


5 


Young Men's Christian Association of Milford 

MlLLBURY 


26,532 13 


13,000 00 


1,490 54 


819 22 


6 


Millbury Society for District Nursing, The . 


1,239 39 


- 


1,322 35 


2,410 38 


7 
8 


Milton 

Milton Hospital and Convalescent Home (26 

beds) ....... 

Milton Social Service League 7 . . . 


82,042 59 


- 


9,811 55 


26,410 61| 


9 


Milton Visiting Nurse and Social Service League 


1,718 25 


- 


4,195 63 


- 


10 


Swift Charity ...... 


63,539 25 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Monson 
Monson Home for Aged People, Inc. 


94,744 04 


- 


2,248 60 


- 


12 


Montague 
Farren Memorial Hospital of Montague City, 
Massachusetts, The (80 beds) . 


251,239 23 


47,000 00 


321 05 


51,130 72 


13 


Nantucket 
Childrens' Aid Society of Nantucket 


6,573 00 


- 


22 00 


- 


14 


Churchhaven, Nantucket, Inc. 


35,007 71 


- 


- 


14 80 


15 
16 


Nantucket Cottage Hospital (18 beds) . 
Old People's Home Association of Nantucket, 
The 


213,589 62 
25,435 64 


— 


29,273 97 
1,260 00 


13,432 23 
11,703 73 : 


17 


Relief Association ..... 


43,529 84 


- 


1,085 17 




18 


Union Benevolent Society, The 


7,285 43 


- 


- 


- 


19 


Wauwinnet Tribe No. 158 Improved Order of 
Redmen ...... 


35,642 74 


17,000 00 


1,486 00 


- 


20 
21 

22 


Natick 

Leonard Morse Hospital (45 beds) 
Maria Hayes Home for Aged Persons . 
Natick Visiting Nurse Association, The 


421,459 67 

109,515 03 

5,466 75 


- 


150 00 

44 00 

1,543 68 


55,463 12 : 
2,395 15 


23 


Need ham 
Glover Home and Hospital 1 










24 


King's Daughters Circle of '86, Inc. 


1,215 75 


- 


225 82 


- 


25 


Needham Visiting Nurse Association Inc. 


404 10 


- 


2,034 69 


269 70 


26 


New Bedford 
Animal Rescue League of New Bedford 


92,065 51 


_ 


548 80 


3,676 06 


27 


Association for the Relief of Aged Women 


664,454 39 


- 


119 05 


450 00 • 


2b 

29 
30 


Charity Brotherhood of the Holy Ghost of the 
North End of New Bedford, Mass., Inc. * . 

Hachnosath Orchim Charitable Association . 

Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society, New 
Bedford, Mass. ..... 


260 00 
2,201 09 


- 


600 00 
1,353 95 


1,032 54 


31 


Henryk Dabrowski Society .... 


8,420 21 


3,000 00 


152 39 


659 02 | 


32 


Howland Fund for Aged Women, Trustees of 
the 


60,246 43 


_ 


- 




33 


James Arnold Fund, Trustees of the 


139,079 56 


- 


- 


- 


34 

35 

36 


Ladies City Mission Society in New Bedford 
New Bedford Anti-Tuberculosis Association 
(operating Sassaquin Sanatorium) (116 beds) 
New Bedford Children's Aid Society 


103,259 45 

321,624 46 
301,994 48 


5,000 00 


7,352 65 

5,470 65 
8,400 45 


1,161 07 

99,907 19 
8,568 05 


37 


New Bedford Country Week Society, Inc. 


18,454 98 


- 


517 00 


338 24 


38 


New Bedford Day Nursery .... 


136,683 61 


- 


5,712 70 


2,755 06 



None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



H. II. 

'haritable Corporations — Continued. 



109 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$2,516 23 


- 


$9,073 53 


$9,441 73 


$6,636 48 


3 




451 


_ a 




1 


633 05 


- 


633 05 


- 


- 


- 




_ 3 


-3 




2 


57 23 
13,605 96 


$5,000 00< 
10,400 00 4 


12,427 72 
73,934 77 


10,024 93 
69,351 81 


7,825 00 
21,319 38 


5 
19 




1,288 
2,308 


68 


_3 


3 

4 


90 00 


- 


3,066 68 


4,420 92 


2,191 04 


{ 3 5 


} 


- 


- 


~ 


5 


58 99 


- 


3,791 72 


3,883 93 


1,895 00 


/ I 3 

I 1 


} 


2,3696 


_ 3 


_3 


6 


3,462 95 


- 


39.685 11 


40.698 77 


_3 


17 




1,207 


17 


- 


7 

s 


26 36 


- 


4,221 99 


3,560 51 


863 26 


4 


J 

I 


72 
1,133 


} " 

24 


38 


9 


3,793 53 


5,376 67 4 


3,793 53 


3,020 86 


50 00 


_3 


24 


-3 


10 


4,757 69 


- 


7,006 29 


7,962 71 


3,753 48 


4 




9 


- 


" 


11 


2,555 94 


- 


53,840 84 


48,466 93 


12,802 12 


23 




1,223 


17 


" 


12 


496 00 


- 


518 00 


458 55 


- 


_ 


! 


12 

2 


} • 

67 


_ 


13 


1,117 45 


- 


1,382 99 


1,407 69 


822 63 


/ I 5 
I 2 


67 


-3 


U 


5,986 44 


- 


45,572 64 


38,822 61 


18,232 90 


15 


438 


68 


" 


15 


1,780 22 


1.186 08 


16,226 61 


749 25 


100 00 


f 15 
I 2 


} 


4 


2 


- 


16 


1,690 83 


- 


2,776 00 


2,739 15 


- 


20 


20 


- 


17 


359 09 


- 


359 09 


354 28 


45 00 


/ 35 

I 3 


} 


- 


- 


8 


IS 


2,928 00 


- 


4,414 00 


4,955 42 


542 40 


7 




15 


- 


3 


19 


39,233 43 

4,654 96 

123 26 


2,924 18 4 


94,846 55 
4,698 96 
4,114 09 


90,788 50 
5,453 88 
3,236 67 


40,847 05 
1,575 00 
2,735 75 


37 
3 
3 




1,283 

7 

436 


-3 

30 


66 


20 

21 
22 


51 72 


„ 


277 54 


253 49 






J 

I 


102 

3 


} * 

187 


1 


23 

24 


- 


- 


2,304 39 


2,375 77 


1,620 00 


1 


1,143 


56 


25 


2,730 03 
28,130 84 


366 74 
/ 193,100 00 4 
{ 3,420 00 


7,371 63 
| 30,119 89 


8,445 14 
29,615 32 


5,227 00 


4 




_3 

69 


-3 

63 


- 


26 

27 


4 70 


- 


604 70 


994 70 


- 


- 




- 


_ 


200 


28 
29 


60 75 


- 


2,447 24 


2,301 15 


- 


_ 




1 


1 


20 


30 


165 04 


900 00 


1,876 45 


754 06 


29 50 


2» 


{ 


32 
2 


} - 


- 


31 


3,241 85 ' 


- 


3,241 85 


3,106 11 


_ 


_ 




37 


37 


_ 


32 


7,238 72 


- 


7,238 72 


7,064 50 


- 


- 


J 

I 


62 
18 


} » 

2,764 


_ 


33 


4,259 98 


- 


12,773 70 


13,494 05 


9,966 34 


6 


5,120 


- 


34 


3,477 10 
15.408 88 


300 00 
2,000 00 4 


109,154 94 
32,377 38 


112,028 49 
30,884 58 


38,577 12 
12,906 52 


43 
9 




215 
159 


67 


_3 


35 
36 


948 93 


- 


1,804 17 


1,722 29 


- 


- 


( 


12 

10 


} » 

120 


-3 


37 


5,620 59 


- 


14,088 35 


13,951 10 


8.180 77 


14 


282 


143 


38 



4 Restricted to capital. s p a id officers. * Visits. 

7 Name changed to Milton Visiting Nurse and Social Service League. 



110 



P. D. 17l 

Abstracts of Reports of Privati 







Total 
Property 


Incum- 
brances on 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 
and 






reported 


Real Estate 


Refunds 




New Bedford — Con. 










1 


New Bedford Dorcas Society 


$20,797 01 


- 


$10 00 


- 


2 


New Bedford Family Welfare Society . 


22,826 91 


_ 


29,057 86 


_ 


3 


New Bedford Home for Aged 


113,471 05 


_ 


28 12 


$1,000 50 


4 


New Bedford Instructive Nursing Association, 












The 


33,072 01 


- 


8,872 98 


14,851 17 


5 


New Bedford Men's Msision, Inc. 


22,086 22 


$2,750 00 


2,607 94 


1,569 90 


6 


New Bedford Port Society .... 


112,624 26 


_ 


197 46 


_ 


7 


New Bedford Port Society, Ladies Branch 


64,255 97 


- 


25 00 


_ 


8 


New Bedford Women's Reform and Relief 
Association x . 










9 


New Bedford Young Men's Christian Associa- 












tion, The ...... 


357,677 11 


- 


14,722 50 


13,975 63 


10 


New Bedford Young Women's Christian 












Association ...... 


411,184 71 


77,700 00 


29,050 65 


60,658 63 


11 


North End Guild of New Bedford 


19,325 65 


— 


1,172 44 


290 30 


12 


Portuguese Relief Association, Inc 


585 83 


- 


364 65 


821 44 


13 


Sacred Heart Home ..... 


276,613 63 


110,500 00 


9,089 13 


34,249 21 


14 


Saint Luke's Hospital of New Bedford (323 












beds) ....... 


3,430,579 29 


* 


77,408 96 


328,246 53 


15 


Saint Mary's Home of New Bedford 


228,776 31 


- 


1,885 72 


11,245 19 


16 


Union for Good Works .... 


230,166 98 


- 


3,628 00 


1,300 00 


17 


Welfare Federation of New Bedford 


2,955 30 


2,929 37 


9,138 9-7 


- 


18 


Winfred Goff Homoeopathic Hospital, The . 
Newburyport 


14,343 97 


~ 


_ 


- 


19 


Anna Jaques Hospital (60 beds) . 


835,881 11 


- 


4,486 50 


48,967 40 


20 


Community Welfare Service of Newburyport, 












Inc., The ...... 


4,815 85 


- 


2,285 61 


963 92 


21 


General Charitable Society of Newburyport . 


57,361 56 


- 


- 




22 


Hale Fund Relief Association of the Newbury- 












port Fire Department, The 


10,579 27 


- 


- 


- 


23 


Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Newburyport, 












The 


96 00 


- 


114 40 


83 44 


24 


Merrimack Humane Society, The 


17,548 29 


- 


- 


- 


25 


Moseley Fund for Social Service in Newbury- 












port, The ...... 


114,569 74 


- 


— 


280 80 


26 


Newburyport Anti-Tuberculosis Association . 


15,920 65 


- 


285 50 


1,805 95 


27 


Newburyport Bethe! Society 


5,179 51 


- 


14 00 


- 


2S 


Newburyport Female Charitable Society, The 


74 89 


- 


- 


_ 


29 


Newburyport Homeopathic Hospital, The (25 












beds) ....... 


90,085 57 


- 


248 00 


15,185 06 


30 


Newburyport Society for the relief of Aged Men 


127,917 38 


- 


- 


970 38 


31 


Newburyport Society for the relief of Aged 












Women ....... 


255,050 87 


- 


187 70 


1,602 23 


32 


Newburyport Young Men's Christian Associa- 












tion ....... 


98,525 79 


- 


5,536 75 


8,253 78 


33 


Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston (Chil- 












dren's Home) 1 ..... 










: J ,4 


Young Women's Christian Association of New- 












buryport ...... 


112,363 64 


- 


558 12 


6,304 27 




Newton 










35 


Baptist Home of Massachusetts, The 


887,284 67 


_ 


22.721 07 


_ 


36 


Boys Welfare League Inc. .... 


1,200 00 








37 


Charles D. Meserve Fund, Inc. 


7,069 90 








38 

39 


Governor John A. Andrew Home Association 
Lamson Home, The ..... 


12,179 22 
8,494 38 


7,500 00 


1,561 55 


5,433 50 


40 


Lucy Jackson Chapter, Daughters of the Amer- 










41 

12 


ican Revolution ... 
Mothers' Rest Association of the City of New- 
ton, Incorporated, The 1 . 
New England Peabody Home for Crippled 


7,501 87 


1,000 00 


3.039 48 


799 34 


43 


Children, The ...... 

Newton Centre Woman's Club, Inc., The 1 . 


1,662,063 99 


- 


15,774 83 


10,501 07 


44 


Newton Circle, Incorporated, The 


2,926 59 


- 


2,210 91 


1,519 27 




- None. i No report. 


2 Organizatio 


ns aided. 


3 Not st 


ited. 



Pt. II. 


















111 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 










Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$1,025 00 




$1,035 00 


$1,134 83 






{ 


32 
120 


} - 


-3 


1 


1,652 29 
3,503 30 


$489 97 


30,710 15 
5,021 89 


31,030 62 
2,583 10 


$13,652 00 
693 35 


9 
4 




950 

5 


950 
1 


_3 


2 
3 


2,583 60 


100 46 4 


26,307 75 


26,562 60 


22,508 34 


15 




3,506 


947 


— 3 


4 


- 


- 


7,398 03 


6,277 62 


2,507 48 


4 


J 
I 


ll 2 
_ 3 


} -' 

49 
9 


- 


5 


3,316 18 
3,113 96 


- 


3,513 64 
3,192 96 


4,251 73 
3,657 88 


1,568 92 
187 50 


2 
1 


93 
9 


- 


6 
7 

8 


9,907 83 


- 


38,612 96 


36,778 57 


22,618 42 


{ r 


1 
/ 


_3 


_3 


- 


9 


2,191 55 

1,689 01 

7 13 

441 07 


3,400 00 4 


91,900 83 
3,151 75 
1,193 22 

43,779 41 


91,087 93 

2,700 17 

892 76 

28,445 90 


42,991 23 

2,030 00 

37 50 

5,287 38 


45 
3 

_3 

20 




_3 

255 
141 


_ 3 

10 


— 3 


10 
11 
12 
13 


106,484 23 


/ 2,378 95 4 
I 583 00 


\ 491,528 11 


448,882 38 


197,770 91 


201 




12,313 


6,253 


- 


14 


4,256 07 
8,558 11 


42,196 07 
3,276 23 4 


59,583 05 
13,486 11 


21,794 13 
12,582 63 


2,624 00 


2 




207 
125 


101 
125 


55 


15 

in 


1 83 


- 


9,140 80 


9,497 70 


8,300 87 


{ r 


I 
J 


142 


- 


- 


17 


373 30 


- 


373 30 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


IX 


33,947 67 


7,000 00 4 


87,421 26 


89,535 85 


33,524 48 


33 




1,627 


125 


- 


19 


3,282 46 
5,310 80 


- 


6,531 99 
5,310 80 


6,592 98 
5,661 82 


2,700 00 
200 00 


2 




613 
75 


_3 
_3 


154 

_3 


20 

21 


540 12 


- 


540 12 


788 95 


- 


- 




11 


11 


" 


22 


- 


- 


197 84 


223 06 


- 


- 


{ 


112 

8 


} - 


_3 


23 


639 60 


- 


639 60 


602 50 


70 00 


/ 2-- 
l 2 


} 


32 




_3 


24 


6,284 02 
2,237 94 


_ 


6,564 82 
4,329 39 


4,927 12 
4,528 62 


2,008 92 


-3 




1,706 
92 


302 

-3 


_3 

17 


25 
26 


260 93 


- 


274 93 


697 50 


- 


- 


1 
I 


22 

4 


} < 

-3 


-3 


27 


195 07 


- 


195 07 


251 00 


- 


- 


7 


5 


28 


3,363 11 


- 


19,090 36 


22,077 76 


10,828 80 


11 




472 


_3 


- 


29 


10,258 14 


- 


11,256 45 


7,211 95 


2,757 45 


{ r 


I 
/ 


11 


" 


- 


30 


14,702 78 


1,500 00 4 


16,837 71 


15,133 52 


5,407 63 


{ i" 


} 


35 


35 


15 


3] 


3,051 53 


- 


17,842 06 


17,069 06 


7,241 55 


5 


{ 


42 
400 


} « 


- 


32 

33 


6,073 70 


- 


12,936 09 


12,933 95 


5,167 83 


{ V 


} 


_ 3 


_3 


- 


34 


| 32,383 95 


6,321 31* 


43,017 53 


47,595 14 


10,986 50 


{ iJ' 


} 


59 


-3 


— 3 


35 


400 39 

70 24 

491 00 


2,377 36 


400 39 

9,486 19 

491 00 


400 00 

9,042 80 

491 00 


3,214 55 


5 


-3 
1 

16 

-3 


_3 
-3 


_3 
-3 


36 
37 

!S 

39 


54 78 


- 


3,893 60 


10,704 90 


- 


- 




92 


" 


" 


40 


1 49,540 00 


26,701 10 


102,517 00 


122,882 53 


51,533 30 


50 




139 


100 


- 


41 

42 
13 

14 


89 86 


- 


3,820 04 


3,380 02 


1,008 00 


1 


! 


1 = 
203 


J 152 


50 



4 Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



L12 



P. D. 17. 1 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 1 



Newton — Con. 
Newton District Nursing Association . 
Newton Hospital (244 beds) 
Newton Welfare Bureau, Inc. 
Newton Young Men's Christian Association, 

The 

Rebecca Pomroy Newton Home for Orphan 

Girls, Corporation of the . 
Senoj Lodge Associates, Inc. 

Stearns School Center 

Stone Institute and Newton Home for Aged 

People 
Swedish Charitable Society of Greater Boston 

The ..... • 

West Newton Community Centre, Incorpo 
rated ...... 

Working Boy's Home . . • . • . 

Young Women's Christian Association oi New- 
ton, Massachusetts, Incorporated l 

Norfolk 
King's Daughters and Sons' Home for the Aged 
in Norfolk County Massachusetts, The 

North Adams 
North Adams Hospital, The (100 beds) 
Venerini Sisters, Inc. . . • 

Young Men's Christian Association of North 
Adams, Mass., The 1 .... 

North Andover 
Charlotte Home, The 

North Attleborough 
North Attleborough District Nursing Associa- 
tion 1 ....... 

Northampton 
Children's Aid Association of Hampshire 
County ..-•••• 

Clarke School for the Deaf, The . 
Cooley Dickinson Hospital, The (125 beds) l . 
Father Matthew Total Abstinence and Benev- 
olent Society of Florence .... 
Hampshire County Public Health Association, 
Inc. . • • • • 

International Medical Missionary Society, The 
Lathrop Home for Aged and Invalid Women in 
Northampton ....-• 
Northampton Visiting Nursing Association, Inc 
Smith Students' Aid Society, Incorporated 
Students Associated Housekeepers, Inc., The 1 
Wright Home for Young Women, The . 
Young Men's Christian Association of North- 
ampton, Massachusetts, The 



Northbridge 
George Marston Whitin Gymnasium Inc. 
Whitinsville Hospital, Inc., The (15 beds) 

N ORTHFIELD 

Northfield Seminary Students Aid Society . 

Norton 
Barrowsville Community Service Corporation, 

The 

Newcomb Home for Old Ladies of Norton, 

Massachusetts, The. . . . . 

NORWELL 

Norwell Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



$7,047 69 
2,220,684 27 

35.450 69 

192,114 21 

90,624 72 
125 00 

808 21 
505,233 29 

103,667 04 

6,431 79 
196,281 77 



101,416 46 



449,730 16 
24,608 08 



83,675 20 



31,878 52 
2,200,287 41 



10,019 73 
6,011 07 



331,804 23 
5,087 75 
77,764 82 

334,543 09 

105,711 77 



215,206 54 
89,969 87 



3,718 61 



2,554 86 
282,119 53 



815 81 



$4,996 73 



6,500 00 



1,100 00 



$4,181 75 
403,168 19 

17,013 43 



25,411 99 

3,049 98 

870 50 

3,303 10 
6,329 57 

7,521 18 

3,531 43 
52,530 71 



3,455 16 



9,294 93 
1.386 60 



9,282 61 
284,775 18 



61 00 



201 75 
3,127 42 
6,331 30 



9,207 86 



5,000 00 
10,408 38 



1,295 00 



900 00 



866 02 



- None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



113 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 

Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$410 50 
21,532 83 


$12,000 00 4 


$12,402 14 
282,353 89 


$12,327 64 
329,467 34 


$8,127 82 
148,126 01 


5 

177 




1,522 
6,246 


289 
2,016 


_3 


1 
2 


1,928 00 


- 


19,644 82 


16,806 30 


6,026 38 


9 


J 
I 


l 2 


} - 


408 


3 


3,528 50 


300 00^ 


63,799 65 


63,707 10 


17,386 68 


13 


J 
I 


30 2 
3,000 


} 1,000 


- 


4 


3,474 64 


1,000 00< 


7,097 62 


6,308 55 


2,680 00 


3 

{ i" 




15 


9 


- 


5 


- 


- 


2,526 85 


2,676 85 


374 00 


} 


114 


10 


-3 


6 


74 44 


- 


3,377 54 


3,024 57 


2,240 66 


l 


{ 


12 

204 


} - 


125 


7 


22,739 17 


/ 1,000 004 
1 1.400 00 


} 29,769 17 


20,406 53 


6,863 77 


8 




25 


_3 


- 


8 


1,992 70 


40 98 


20,158 29 


10,174 60 


2,812 60 


4 




79 


55 


18 


9 


11 35 
132 93 


8,037 27 


3,782 20 
81,246 91 


3,961 59 
80,697 59 


2,456 99 
7,509 00 


7 
17 

m 




302 
195 


104 
45 


-t 


10 
11 

12 


4,985 27 


10,000 00 


20,660 67 


12,249 98 


3,166 58 


5 




17 


17 


- 


13 




- 


67,156 53 
9,337 63 


83,827 91 
8,690 21 


38,719 45 
156 95 


33 

_3 




1,584 

_3 


43 

_3 


_3 


14 

15 

16 


2,362 16 


- 


2,362 16 


1,347 52 


- 


- 




145 


24 


37 


17 
18 


1,678 48 


_ 


17,022 21 


18,579 28 


7,828 37 


6 


/ 

I 


232 
270 


} 208 
1 


_ 


19 


81,580 95 


4,721 164 


209,949 36 


174,005 24 


89,246 93 


78 


147 


- 


20 

21 


54 


- 


206 67 


202 96 


20 95 






32 


2 


- 


22 


84 45 


- 


6,835 65 


5,825 40 


1,780 00 


l 5 




60 


39 


_3 


23 

24 


10,186 11 

160 40 

4,091 12 


18,816 35 
1,000 00 


37,022 33 

4,287 82 
14,943 54 


16,212 86 
6,330 66 
7,299 91 


6,722 67 

5,398 37 

180 00 






38 

1,033 

50 


318 


-3 


25 
26 

27 
28 


16,089 88 


- 


16,089 88 


10,394 71 


4,038 11 


{ r 


} 


17 


17 


" 


29 


3,990.01 


599 76 


23,022 26 


23,036 09 


10,699 35 


6 


{ 


352 
3,375 


} 2,480 


" 


30 


8 74 
3,405^67 


10,000 00 4 


5,008 74 
28,144 33 


5,200 00 
24,903 27 


9,603 58 


12 




_3 

886 


_3 


-.3 


31 
32 


1,277 58 


- 


4,293 47 


4,744 82 


- 


- 




53 


- 


- 


33 


3 12 


- 


903 12 


900 00 


_ 


_ 




_3 


_3 


-3 


•34 


16,471 43 


- 


24,278 00 


8,728 43 


4,479 61 


4 




5 


5 


" 


35 


9 24 


- 


1,426 01 


522 38 


199 97 


1 




420 


333 


43 


36 



Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



114 



P. D. 17 
Abstracts of Reports of Privat] 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Norwood 
Lewis and Anna M. Day Home for Aged in 
Norwood, Inc. .... 

Norwood Civic Association . 

Norwood Hospital (75 beds) 

Norwood Lithuanian American Citizens Asso^ 
ciation ...... 

Oak Bluffs 
Marthas Vineyard Hospital, Inc. (27 beds) 

Orange 

Orange Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., The 

Oxford 

Oxford Home for Aged People 

Palmer 

Wing Memorial Hospital Association (35 beds) 

Peabody 

Charles B. Haven Home for Aged Men in Pea- 
body ....... 

Female Benevolent Society at South Danvers 

Hebrew Ladies Gemilath Chessad of Peabody, 
Massachusetts ..... 

Isaac Munroe Home for Orphan and Needy 
Children 

Ladies Auxiliary of the Congregation Anshe 
Sfard of Peabody, Massachusetts 

Peabody Finnish Workingmen's Association 
"Taimi" ...... 

Peabody Hebrew Ladies Aid Association 

Peabody Visiting Nurse Association 

Sutton Home for Aged Women in Peabody . 

Pepperell 
Pepperell District Nurse Association, Inc. 

Petersham 
Petersham Exchange, The . 

PlTTSFIELD 

Associated Charities of Pittsfield, The . 

Berkshire Benevolent Association for the Blind 
Inc., The 

Berkshire Branch of the Woman's Board of 
Missions in Boston .... 

Berkshire County Home for Aged Women 

Berkshire County Society for the Care of Crip 
pled and Deformed Children, The 

Boys* Club of Pittsfield 

Epworth Mission of Pittsfield, Mass. 

Hillcrest Surgical Hospital (40 beds) 

House of Mercy (189 beds) . 

Kiwanis Health Camp of Pittsfield, Inc. 

Pittsfield Anti-Tuberculosis Association 

Pittsfield Day Nursery Association 

St. Luke's Hospital of Pittsfield, Massachu 

setts Inc. (150 beds) 
Visiting Nurse Association of Pittsfield, Mass 
Young Women's Club of Pittsfield, The 1 

Plymouth 
Boys' Club of Plymouth, The 

Chiltonville Community Club, Inc. 

Jordan Hospital, The (66 beds) 



$178,592 49 
454,158 66 

11,034 56 

115,389 64 

204 55 

72,418 48 

35,012 52 

78,676 60 
26,634 52 

739 25 

27,175 15 

430 00 

6,225 29 

372 00 

1,918 60 
95,380 97 

607 82 

5,480 97 

29,844 54 



2,514 70 


1,280 31 


400,535 39 


381,795 60 


529,190 30 


18,548 57 


94,377 05 


972,520 17 


2,237 88 


215,522 06 
12,610 26 


562,147 95 
28,316 17 


33,223 20 


306 76 


360,084 81 



$1,700 00 
32,000 00 



4,000 00 



4,200 00 



11,500 00 



363,500 00 



00 



- 


$9,017 95 


508 40 


30,281 10 


1,366 00 


16 00 


12,340 75 


596 99 


521 00 


195 79 


129 92 


1,174 00 


416 00 


- 



1,084 50 
239 00 

15,410 83 
232 13 

9,820 70 
4,925 10 

9,050 05 

14,350 00 

133 87 

445 35 

28,096 00 

4,978 14 

7,233 70 
3,735 70 

24,949 51 
3,501 94 



2,370 27 
147 00 
970 61 



- None. 



1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



115 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$5,000 00' 
3,334 02 



1,000 00 



1,000 00 



2,750 00 



5,000 OO^ 
2,015 93 



10,000 00' 



27,283 86 4 
12,500 00 



15,100 00' 

5,000 00 
19,320 00 



$16,229 88 
107,022 87 

946 40 

52,894 64 
2,395 21 
4,040 89 

39,656 88 



2,503 58 
2,220 99 

521 00 

1,540 94 

195 79 

1,034 08 

1,174 00 

4,391 02 
9,528 15 

2,105 78 



18,031 59 

2,232 47 

9,870 70 
26,956 68 

35,549 29 
39,324 79 
133 87 
63,307 84 
253,131 93 

5,244 64 

21,510 66 
4,382 92 

156,863 01 
16,330 38 



8,972 38 

703 60 

72,913 79 



$15,568 68 
107,895 93 

882 97 

34,956 42 

2,485 35 

1,732 87 

25,719 68 



2,018 81 
1,233 86 

151 75 

1,062 50 

183 79 

1,029 29 

1,202 00 

4,401 28 
4,999 96 

1,498 68 

3,954 92 

16,450 30 

1,912 87 

162 75 
22,698 10 

35,136 90 

39,276 59 

369 89 

61,176 38 

241,218 60 

2,782 79 

21,083 48 
5,047 88 

159,171 78 
17,196 72 



4,291 80 

703 04 

59,012 35 







$8,118 34 


{ £ 


47,361 92 


49 


12,962 24 


19 


1,895 00 


1 


12,365 91 


14 


551 00 
50 00 


2 
is 


25 00 


16 


96 00 


1 


3,468 00 
1,290 00 


2 
3 


1,036 81 


1 


1,094 20 


3 


3,461 59 


2 


8,286 14 


9 


18,275 72 


{ il 1 

25 


20,303 00 


5 63 


1 


17,567 48 


21 


97,490 32 


93 


335 00 


4 


8,312 47 
3,091 10 


8 
4 


35,446 40 
13,506 80 


59 
9 


2,120 73 


2 


90 15 


1 


22,942 05 


24 



5,000 
3,295 

4 
409 
273 

834 



\ 35 

538 

9 



/ 2 2 

1 1,873 



29 



30 

2,500 
1 

6,323 

3,449 

1 

51 

20 

4,954 

4,757 
2,476 



482 
l 2 
1 
1,310 







500 


-3 


473 


~ 


7 


- 


19 


~ 


2 




_3 


_3 


- 


3 


_3 


17 


41 
6 


30 


_3 


_3 


_3 


- 


1,873 


_3 


_3 


_3 


- 


- 


29 


- 


15 


- 


2,500 


- 


-3 


_3 


17 


- 


207 


" 


51 


45 


_ 


- 


233 


- 


91 
421 


- 




_ 


_3 


- 


15 


- 



Restricted to capital. 



6 Paid officers. 



116 



P. D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of PrivaUl 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 




Plymouth — Con. 










1 


Long Pond Ladies Aid Society 


$2,096 47 


- 


$5 00 


$351 57 


2 


Plymouth Community Nurse Association, In- 
corporated ...... 


163 15 


_ 


1,547 25 


2,282 00 


3 


Plymouth Fragment Society 


48,969 03 


- 


195 93 


- 


4 
5 


Ryder Home for Old People, Corporation of the 
Sunnyside, Inc. ...... 


78,257 40 
4,500 00 


- 


433 78 
1,895 00 


200 00 


6 


Princeton 
Girls Vacation House Association, The . 


38,714 96 


- 


1,484 00 


1,656 00 


7 


Provincetown 
Provincetown Helping Hand Society 


67,634 35 


- 


- 


- 


8 
9 

10 

11 


QUINCY 

Atlantic Women's Club, Inc., The 

City Hospital of Quincy (150 beds) (Hospital 
operated by City of Quincy) 

Family Welfare Society of Quincy, Massachu- 
setts, The 

Knights of Columbus Civic Institute of Quincy, 
Mass. ....... 


1,829 39 

118,033 69 

11,369 63 

10,018 79 


: 


141 20 

13,060 68 
1,561 92 


210 70 


12 


National Sailors Home .... 


299,898 97 


- 


- 


- 


13 
14 
15 
16 


Quincy Day Nursery Association . 

Quincy Women's Club .... 

Sailors Snug Harbor, of Boston 

William B. Rice Eventide Home . 


4,222 53 

55,424 43 

500,971 09 

512,295 12 


$13,900 00 


32 00 

9,672 00 

2,615 00 


9,302 30 
1,663 40 
2,900 00 


17 


Wollaston Woman's Club .... 


12,142 23 


- 


3,666 02 


1,266 08 


IS 


Young Men's Christian Association of Quincy, 
Mass., The ...... 


114,425 39 


13.700 00 


34,662 48 


18,789 40 


19 

20 


Randolph 
Boston School for the Deaf .... 
Seth Mann 2d Home for Aged and Infirm 
Women, The ...... 


493,382 46 
229,622 86 


50,000 00 


101,645 00 
280 00 


_ 


21 
22 

23 


Reading 

Reading Home for Aged Women . 
Reading Visiting Nurse Association 
Victory House Associates, Inc. 


39,009 94 

5,301 08 

40 46 


- 


4,147 55 
1,039 23 


1,365 72 


24 

25 

26 


Revere 
Beachmont Catholic Club .... 

Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association of 
Revere ....... 

Home for Aged People in Revere 1 


3,565 83 
263 33 


1,000 00 


269 25 
297 28 


534 35 
989 95 


27 


Ingleside Corporation, The .... 


145,378 93 


- 


3,071 84 


4,724 16 


28 


Revere Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 


5,180 36 


- 


3,188 52 


5,074 90 


29 
30 


Rockland 
French Home for Aged Women, The » . 
Hartsuff Post Memorial Association, Incorpo- 
rated ....... 


19,184 98 






. 


31 

32 
33 


Rutland 

rated (95 beds) .... 
Rutland Entertainment Association, Inc. 
Rutland Masonic Charitable and Educational 

Association ...... 


424.680 40 
2,310 68 

3,530 46 


45,000 00 


29,848 35 
1,524 00 

750 00 


148,532 96 


34 


Salem 
Association for the Relief of Aged and Desti- 
tute W'omen, in Salem .... 


469,588 48 


. 


710 00 


600 00 


35 


Bertram Home for Aged Men 


353,692 48 


- 


- 


249 10 


36 
37 
38 
39 


Bungalow Associates, Inc. of Salem » 
Children's Island Sanitarium, The (94 beds) . 
City Orphan Asylum ..... 
Family Welfare Society of Salem . 


147,369 69 
58,516 83 
40,907 01 


- 


11,654 89 
8,768 38 


2,731 79 



None. 



1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



» Not stated. 



Pt. II. 


















117 


pharitable Colorations 


— Continued. 










Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




- 


- 


$356 57 


$355 83 


- 


- 


{ 


3 2 
1 


l 

1 


_ 


1 


$5 50 


- 


3,834 75 


3,787 68 


$3,300 00 


2 




255 


4 


- 


2 


2,718 46 


- 


2,914 39 


2,072 38 


- ' 


- 


J 
I 


l 2 
19 


} .. 

17 


28 


3 


2,922 52 


$19,820 00 


23,379 30 
1,895 00 


2,809 96 
1,895 00 


855 00 
735 40 


1 
3 


9 

17 


= 


4 
5 


1,388 61 


- 


4,528 61 


5,588 35 


1,980 75 


9 




178 


32 


- 


6 


2,907 10 


- 


2,907 10 


2,961 36 


- 


- 


/ 

I 


22 

58 


} ';■ 


30 


7 


69 89 


- 


450 79 


316 85 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


8 


6,182 88 


- 


6,182 88 


6,046 85 


400 00 


-3 




- 


- 


- 


9 


501 58 


- 


3,562 26 


4,175 03 


2,940 00 


2 




- 


- 


430 


10 


10 45 


- 


2,097 67 


2,394 81 


1,383 00 


1 


{ 


3 2 

-3 


} - 


26 


11 


14,060 83 


- 


14,060 83 


15,321 44 


2,636 00 


f 1« 

1 6 


} 


17 


17 


_ 


12 


207 36 

6,121 87 
18,104 89 
4,098 98 


21,319 12 


239 36 
25,096 17 
19,778 00 
30,933 10 


270 50 

18,489 55 
16,254 47 
13,185 69 


10,774 12 
3,987 08 
4,753 90 


8 
5 

5 


5 2 
1,970 
21 
15 


255 
20 


- 


13 

14 
LS 

16 


70 61 


- 


5,002 71 


3,897 07 


- 


- 


{ 


22 2 
37 


■} i, 


4 


17 


5,255 16 


- 


39,707 04 


39,848 28 


16,000 95 


8 


( 


43 2 
2,464 


J 425 


- 


L8 


965 51 


- 


102,610 51 


76,114 37 


38,719 S3 


47 




208 


208 


_ 


19 


11,632 83 


- 


11,632 83 


11,027 69 


3,558 00 


{ r 


} 


6 


6 


- 


20 


2,281 97 


1,518 53 


7,963 51 
2,439 81 


4,926 14 
2,361 69 


1,815 46 
1,944 16 


3 
1 




10 
310 


10 

_3 


_3 


21 
22 
23 


- 


- 


803 60 


1,002 67 


- 


_ 




_ 


_ 


-3 


24 


93 75 


- 


1,380 98 


1,494 37 


- 


- 




- 


- 


85 


25 


1,750 73 


- 


9,557 21 


14,086 54 


6,560 14 


{ [ v 

3 


} 


40 


9 


_ 


26 
27 


84 84 




8,358 36 


6,606 00 


5,255 05 


17,693 


8,805 


136 


28 


1,433 47 


- 


1,433 47 


1,415 87 


440 00 


1 




- 


- 


- 


29 
30 


5,372 31 


- 


184,359 03 
1,524 00 


198,130 23 
1,496 27 


74,031 14 


43 




226 

525 


62 
525 


22 


31 

32 


168 00 ' 


- 


918 00 


465 16 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


33 


20,584 88 


8,500 00 « 


21,894 88 


26,066 96 


9,869 69 


1 11 


j 


41 


41 




34 


15,687 22 


662 00 < 


15,936 32 


12,111 03 


4,228 96 


1 1' 
\ 7 


J 


19 


19 


- 


35 


8,085 84 
1,307 30 
1,779 97 


3,000 00 
700 00 


22,740 73 

1,307 30 

14,027 97 


25,128 99 
12,979 34 


8,574 62 
6,265 00 


27 
4 




104 


104 


341 


36 

37 
38 
39 



Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



118 



P. D. 17.J 
Abstracts of Reports of PrivatA 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 

[3 


Salem — Con. 
House of the Seven Gables Settlement Associa 

tion, The 1 
Lydia E. Pinkham Memoria;, Incorporated 

The 

Mack Industrial School 


$117,333 85 

77,011 18 




$25 00 


$318 58 


4 


Marine Society at Salem in New England 


148,486 22 


- 


- 


_ 


5 


North Shore Babies Hospital, The (50 beds) 


118,689 11 


- 


1,967 81 


36,549 58 


6 


Plummer Farm School of Reform for Boys 


169,577 33 


- 


- 


4,901 68 


7 
8 

9 

10 

11 
L2 


Salem Animal Eescue League 
Salem Association for the Prevention of Tuber 
culosis ...... 

Salem Charitable Mechanic Association 
Salem East India Marine Society, The . 
Salem Female Charitable Society, The . 
Salem Fraternity .... 


8,999 94 

4,782 20 

2,832 91 

46,764 17 

48,487 87 

166,570 06 


- 


521 71 
5,365 51 

193 00 
425 70 


436 30 
1,659 72 

530 53 


13 


Salem Hebrew Ladies Aid Society 


1,086 42 


- 


546 00 


723 45 


14 

15 

Iti 

1 

17 

L8 

L9 


Salem Hospital (132 beds) . 

Salem Relief Committee (Inc.) 

Salem Seamen's Orphan and Children's Frienc 

Society 1 ..... 
Salem War Chest Association 
Salem Young Men's Christian Association 
Salem Young Women's Association, The 


1,675.890 81 
11,854 03 

28,442 54 

295,111 06 

42,573 75 


$29,600 00 
3,920 00 


7,254 69 
1,338 79 

8,412 97 
1.138 75 


177,332 90 
502 35 

10,213 39 
4,673 59 


20 


Samaritan Society .... 


66,230 77 


- 


209 50 


- 


21 
22 


Sarah E. Sherman Memorial Association 
Seamen's Widow and Orphan Association 


2,137 88 
118,107 40 


_ 


16 50 


: 


23 


Woman's Friend Society 


85,289 85 


- 


2,867 91 


12,711 73 


24 


Sandwich 

Sandwich Health Association, Incorporated 


1,030 70 


- 


1,222 96 


185 54 


25 


Saugus 
Saugus Visiting Nurse Association 


1,186 23 


_ 


1,211 83 


560 80 


26 


Women's Civic League of Clif tondale. Inc., Th 


i 2,840 68 


- 


284 95 


1,000 45 


27 
28 


SCITUATE 

Arwile Inc. 1 ..... 
Children's Sunlight Hospital (70 beds) . 


97,910 99 




15,174 28 


3,908 56 


2D 


Lydia Collett Corporation, The . 


5,834 34 


2,500 00 


584 10 


43 65 


30 
31 


Sharon 
Boston Lakeshore Home 
Sharon Sanatorium, The (51 beds) 


40,637 58 
526,693 67 


- 


28,022 00 


37,637 52 


32 


Sherborn 
Sherborn Widows' and Orphans' Benevolen 
Society, The ..... 


t 

16,127 94 




9 00 




33 


Shirley 
Altrurian Club of Shirley, The 

SOMERVILLE 


3,135 40 


- 


149 50 


412 53 


34 


Associated Charities of Somerville 


66,466 64 


- 


2,559 20 


- 


35 

36 


Hutchinson Home Corporation for Aged Wome 
Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor, Th 


n 60,705 00 
80,025 00 


_ 


9,147 07 


1,000 00 


37 


Somerville Home for the Aged 


477,276 34 


- 


426 93 


7,807 76 


38 
39 

10 
41 


Somerville Hospital (80 beds) 
Somerville Hospital Ladies' Aid Association, Tl 
Somerville Rotary Educational Fund, Inc. 
Somerville Young Men's Christian Associatior 


191,351 04 

ie 2,727 68 

1,666 27 

i 161,645 15 


7,100 00 
35,000 00 


6,298 65 

187 00 

810 00 

26,770 75 


79,966 67 
1,064 48 

4,539 51 


12 


Visiting Nursing Association of Somerville 
Massachusetts .... 


1,467 69 


_ 


573 00 


5,779 64 


43 


Washington Street Day Nursery of Somervill 


i 5,996 79 


- 


- 


- 


44 


SOUTHBRIDGE 
Harrington Hospital Corporation . 


11.616 44 


- 


13,024 94 


- 



- None. 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

^Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



119 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
vidual 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$8,748 19 
3,889 22 

8.035 41 

1,000 00 

8,620 46 

428 37 

12 92 

156 91 

2,164 45 

2,354 78 

7,620 03 

1 20 

28,877 90 
674 30 



1,185 31 

17,163 68 

1,440 09 

2,115 64 

92 88 

6,443 76 

3,471 14 



286 63 
29 01 



789 66 
362 75 



1,434 65 
20,974 65 



1,012 24 
119 00 



3,632 66 

3,263 69 
188 55 

18,838 60 

6,449 08 
505 46 
81 52 
75 00 

21 25 
292 03 

124 00 



$18,650 00^ 



6,353 50' 
2,508 33 



9,061 37 
1.000 00 



1,000 00 
5,184 26^ 
1,500 00 



200 00 



1,750 00 



49,193 58' 



316 14 
21,502 43 



$8,748 19 
4,232 80 

8.035 41 
39,776 24 
13,522 14 

1,386 38 

7,038 15 
156 91 
2,164 45 
5,056 11 
8,632 76 

1,270 65 

222,526 86 
3,415 44 



1,185 31 
37,304 12 
8,252 43 

3,825 14 

709 38 
6,443 76 

19,250 78 



1,695 13 



1,801 64 
1,285 40 



17,814 20 
990 50 



1,434 65 
77,156 23 



1,021 24 
690 25 

6,679 83 

4,263 69 
31,743 00 

27,073 29 

92,714 40 

1,756 94 

891 52 

31,727 46 

6,977 93 
292 03 



$9,178 55 

3.442 15 

7,426 36 
41,134 53 
12,912 75 

1,251 44 

7,338 60 
421 81 
1,910 50 
2,292 25 
7,638 24 

730 51 

222,526 86 
2,429 46 

25 00 
33,974 75 
3,974 75 

4,050 79 

125 00 

6.443 76 

17,076 42 



1,706 82 



1,539 44 
1,271 76 



18,715 68 
544 52 



440 00 

77,788 68 



1,053 75 
464 66 

6,563 87 

2,382 28 
23,812 00 

19,011 30 

91,047 55 
979 40 
853 00 

32,112 71 



,277 00 
200 00 



1,724 00 1,532 50 



$6,898 93 
1,197 75 

1,400 00 

11,237 70 

5,041 00 



3,872 71 

200 00 

4,524 97 



99,585 58 
1,000 00 



15,737 07 
2,053 50 



300 00 

,868 25 



600 00 
1,321 85 



7,639 54 
74 75 



21,233 49 



2,526 00 
86 00 



6,653 80 
39,418 84 



16,651 27 
6,763 38 



in 



30 



2,085 
5 

1 

334 

43 

1,508 6 

253 



70 
57,931 * 
22 
25 



55(1 



4,600 
154 



512 



4 OS 



116 
32 



170 
/ 32 

I 



57 



16 



1,000 

5 
275 

52 

3,461 
1! 

5 



3 2 
1,557 
32 



2,085 
5 



2.5:5 



70 



25 



3,233 
450 



3,000 
5 



5 

29 

L93 



354 
3 

170 



275 

76 
5 

93 



Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



6 Animals. 



7 Attendance. 



120 



P. D. 17. j 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 


SOUTHBRIDGE — Con. 

Young Men's Christian Association of South- 
bridge ....... 


$100,353 70 




$3,295 68 


$1,954 63 


2 


Spencer 
Spencer Good Samaritan and District Nurse 
Association ...... 

Springfield 


20,672 48 


- 


447 60 


690 75 


3 


American International College 


408,966 93 


$39,500 00 


46,740 34 


31,977 10 


4 
5 
6 


Baby Feeding Association of Springfield, The 
Catholic Woman's Club of Springfield, The . 
Community Chest of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, Inc. ...... 


4,195 01 
29,428 95 


- 


1,461 00 

337,157 73 


1,652 70 


7 
8 


Congregation of The Daughters of Our Lady 
of Mercy l ..... . 

Daughters of Jacob Free Loan Association . 


417 29 




938 00 


13,899 85 


9 


Daughters of Zion Old Peoples Home . 


12,957 36 


- 


2,633 97 


725 00 


10 


Family Welfare Association of Springfield 


73,438 91 


- 


62,747 05 


4,644 75 


11 

12 
13 

14 


Good Shepherd Association of Springfield, 
Mass., The ...... 

Good Will, Inc., The 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association 

Hampden County Tuberculosis and Public 
Health Association ..... 


157,014 83 
113,748 32 
45,923 51 


5,000 00 


30,768 45 
14,339 21 
7,077 00 


43,984 54 
13,971 93 
18,698 02 


15 


Hampton Club, Inc. of Springfield, Mass. 


886 39 


- 


733 10 


748 65 


16 


Horace A. Moses Foundation Incorporated . 


4,254,643 15 


- 


100,000 00 


- 


17 


Horace Smith Fund, The .... 


319,678 44 


- 


- 


- 


18 


James W. Hale Fund, Trustees of the . 


35,391 40 


- 


- 


- 


19 


Jewish Social Service Bureau, Inc. 


143 68 


- 


11,178 21 


193 44 


20 
21 

22 

23 


Junior Achievement, Incorporated 

Legal Aid Society of Springfield, Massachu- 
setts, Inc., The ..... 

Mercy Hospital of Springfield, Mass., The (400 
beds) 

Particular Council of the Society of St. Vincent 
de Paul of Springfield, Mass., The 


111,752 04 

51 06 

915,407 02 

19,781 62 


335,000 00 


40,900 87 
6,290 00 
7,558 42 
8,041 99 


2,730 95 
858 10 
275,181 72 . 
2,244 00 


24 


St. John's Institutional Activities 6 


234,961 33 


12,600 00 


20,388 33 


6,027 42 


2. r , 


Service League Foundation, Inc. . 


1,045,936 02 


- 


7,060 00 


- 


26 

27 


Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children, The 

(60 beds) 

Springfield Boys' Club .... 


514,869 75 
245,165 60 


- 


84,292 96 
26,899 94 


220 97 
7,647 70 


28 


Springfield Day Nursery Corporation . 


168,640 62 


- 


9,435 00 


1,507 14 


29 


Springfield Girls Club .... 


63,323 41 


375 00 


12,230 54 


3,190 10 


30 


Springfield Home for Aged Men . 


320,263 67 


- 


- 


4,050 00 


31 
32 

3£ 

A 


Springfield Home for Aged Women 

Springfield Home for Friendless Women and 
Children ...... 

Springfield Hospital, The (190 beds) . 

Springfield Nursing & Public Health Associa- 
tion ....... 


441,110 26 

409,939 48 
1,993,178 24 

1,015 00 


- 


3,184 41 

11,048 00 
23,637 00 

26,480 30 


5,953 42 

4,886 88 
247,159 81 

22,481 42 


35 


Springfield Rescue Mission, The . 


105,413 80 


- 


7,639 44 


4,992 37 


J6 

37 
38 
$9 

4(1 
41 


Springfield Young Men's Christian Association, 
The 

Springfield Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation ....... 

Travelers Aid Society of Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts ...... 

United Courts of Massachusetts Catholic 
Order of Foresters of Springfield, Inc. 

Wesson Maternity Hospital (51 beds) . 

Wesson Memorial Hospital (120 beds) . 


1,376,074 21 

228,160 55 

15 68 

25,049 68 
558,812 46 
862,340 61 


250,000 00 

13,000 00 
19,825 00 
75,000 00 


112,675 07 

16,618 77 

6,257 00 

2,906 02 

6,497 79 

500 00 


173,785 50 

37,777 95 

284 77 

90,827 50 
125,826 14 


42 


Stockbridge 
Austen Riggs Foundation Inc. 


155,459 38 


- 


18,822 42 


87,825 95 



None. 



1 No Report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



* Restricted to capital. 



t. II. 

haritable Corporations 



Continued. 



121 



Legacie 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$8,052 93 

124 70 

6,782 47 

170 96 
8,206 35 

13 85 
134 81 

4,146 30 

60 00 
5,997 27 



18,534 97 

1,908 25 

71 18 

7 78 

199 18 

51 95 

8,794 99 

47,893 59 

400 90 

2,950 80 

5,044 25 

4 00 

10,795 20 

17,875 83 

18,585 57 

76,191 76 

243 98 



16,039 15 

5,313 59 

5 90 



10,560 01 
13,518 56 



1,244 29 



$4,452 



71,621 30< 

2,560 00 

2,052 48 4 



1,552 48^ 

8,834 634 

9,182 88* 

7,244 38 4 



6,552 494 



500 00 



$13,361 17 



2,381 05 



83,052 39 

3,284 66 
345,364 08 

15,411 12 
3,493 78 

72,962 44 

77,372 99 

34,308 41 

26,118 90 

1,489 37 

277,454 63 

18,534 97 

1,908 25 

11,371 65 

41,989 18 

7,155 88 

275,390 90 

14,715 34 

28,437 32 

55,719 40 

84,914 83 
37,727 61 

15,986 39 

14.2S2 10 

14,845 20 

27,013 66 

34,520 45 
346,988 57 

49,205 70 
12,632 30 

226,981 55 
59,610 31 

6,547 67 

2,906 02 
107,885 30 
140,344 70 

107,892 66 



$13,009 33 


2,616 36 


99,792 64 


2,847 36 


379,773 27 


642 40 


3,781 27 


74,121 51 


68,929 72 


33,702 79 


25,158 11 


877 50 


122,242 65 


13,078 58 


1,864 35 


11,291 97 


46,695 90 


7,114 82 


260,391 64 


13,048 85 


28,243 31 


68,215 23 


83,963 82 
38,291 49 


15,868 50 


14,282 29 


9,782 77 


27,103 20 


39,737 69 
345,853 81 


49,205 70 


12,815 34 


228,720 78 


59,914 05 


6,531 99 


3,455 73 
108,733 60 
158,976 98 


112,978 27 



$6,378 40 



1,645 00 



59,944 61 



9,900 00 

218 00 
1,145 00 

16,252 60 

10,764 00 
9,357 97 
12,616 00 

12,591 00 

475 00 

95 37 

2,939 38 

30,969 18 

6,287 20 

36,350 62 

12,444 51 
12,548 54 

46,024 34 
15,068 46 

8,465 79 

9,065 17 

3,231 00 

10,459 65 

17,537 15 
151,551 98 

40,562 57 

5.574 87 

114,689 26 
32,458 47 

5.575 76 



49,818 50 
60,878 64 



30,722 61 



82 



20 

2 ; 
4 
11 

25 
154 

25 
4 

70 

25 

4 



19 



490 



164 



2s '- 



115 
Jl 



351 

168 

502 

7,884 

7 

802 

4 

57 
536 

788 



1,800 

9,335 

52 
829 

1,500 

162 



551 

2,600 

102 

169 

975 

15 

61 

325 
17.914 

7,665 

92 

22,296 

7,500 < 

108,006 

5,870 



1,238 
3,270 



53 



349 

27 

7,884 
7 
4 

536 



1,778 
178 



1,175 



551 



117 
6,570 



4,022 
3,443 



26,517 



54 

Hil 



27 



2,000 



134 



106 



3,048 



626 



6 Paid officers. 



6 Name changed to Dunbar Community League, Inc. 



Membership. 



122 



P. D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of Privat 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 
and Gifts 
Restricted 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Stoneham 
Home for Aged People in Stoneham, The 

Stoneham Visiting Nursing Association 

Stoughton 
South Stoughton Community Service, Inc. 

Stow 
Red Acre Farm, Incorporated 

Sutton 
Wilkinsonville Community Association 

SWAMPSCOTT 

Florence Crittenton Rescue League 6 



Swansea 



Rest House, Inc. 



Taunton 



Hand Society of 



Bethlehem Home 

Hebrew Ladies Helping 

Taunton, The .... 

Morton Hospital (75 beds) . 
Social Welfare League, Inc. of Taunton 
Taunton Boys' Club Association of Taunton 
Taunton Female Charitable Association 

Taunton Girls Club, Incorporated, The 

Taunton Visiting Nurse Association Inc., The 

Young Men's Christian Association, of Taunton 

Templeton 
Hospital Cottages for Children, The (140 beds) 
Woman's Board of the Hospital Cottages for 
Children at Baldwinville, Massachusetts, The 

TOPSFIELD 

Topsfield Community Club .... 

UXBRIDGE 

Uxbridge Samaritan Society 

Wakefield 
Elizabeth E. Boit Home for Aged Women 
Wakefield Hebrew Ladies Charitable Society 
Wakefield Visiting Nurse Association . 



Walpole 

Walpole Visiting Nurse Association 

Waltham 
Hamblin L. Hovey Institute, Inc. 

Jonas Willis Parmenter Rest Home, Inc. 

Leland Home for Aged Women, The 
Mount Prospect School, The 
Waltham Animal Aid Society 
Waltham Baby Hospital, The (22 beds) 
Waltham District Nursing Association . 

Waltham Graduate Nurses Association 

Waltham Hospital, The (125 beds) 
Waltham Social Service League . 
Young Men's Hebrew Association of Waltham l 

Ware 
Mary Lane Hospital Association (34 beds) 

Warren 
South Warren Community, Incorporated, The 



5142,626 33 


10,645 33 


5.044 35 


169,497 28 



983 56 



152,981 17 



37.140 16 

61 77 

254,439 96 
2,564 48 

126,666 85 
17,397 59 
31,732 95 
45,006 81 



519,757 38 
26,984 55 



3,754 70 
7,627 36 



73,167 90 

184 71 

5,214 27 



274,670 44 

352,915 74 

164,356 61 
184,847 14 
8,327 05 
53,865 94 
17,402 18 

364 10 

1,064,624 80 
937 60 



770,675 26 
67 67 



$2,400 00 



5,000 00 
15,000 00 



250,000 00 



33,000 00 



$2,269 50 
1,013 15 



27 00 



1,265 00 



33 29 



1,010 00 



5,990 20 

177 90 

15,925 45 
2,254 47 

7,134 71 
3,039 77 
5,853 50 
10,612 00 



6,489 63 
1,322 44 

699 25 

1,990 90 



3,074 04 

83 25 

1,533 30 



107 00 



407 00 

2,842 10 
1,080 33 
1,420 00 

594 21 

6,604 69 
3,240 76 



3,777 25 
454 59 



$3,968 63 
1,528 44 



- None. 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



i't. ii. 
















123 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 












Interest, 
.Dividends, 
Annuities, 
«cid Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 

Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 


j $4,068 75 


/ $10,000 00 4 
1 32,194 43 


} $42,501 31 


$12,221 22 


$661 40 


2 


7 


7 


. 


1 


60 56 


10,000 00 


12,602 15 


3,044 88 


2,074 50 


1 


/ I 2 
I 2,738 


J 604 


290 


2 


70 00 


- 


518 45 


411 53 


- 


- 


_ 3 


_3 


_ 


3 


10,337 49 


20,485 42 


36,787 31 


9,327 28 


4,146 30 


4 


f 4^ 

I 715 7 


} 640 7 


- 


4 


- 


- 


33 29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 

Q 


5,232 80 


- 


13,246 72 


16,482 80 


5,149 60 


/ I 5 

I 6 


} 300 


- 


- 


7 


184 09 


100 00 


8,939 94 


7,313 81 


827 59 


8 


110 


42 


- 


8 


2 89 


- 


180 79 


245 78 


- 


- 


| 22 

2,442 

1 


I 
/ 

36 
1 


8 


9 


7,140 98 
112 70 


- 


84,389 96 
112 70 


79,023 83 
8 25 


29,259 45 


27 


- 3 


10 

11 


5,164 43 


1,762 16^ 


8,216 48 


6,668 94 


2,313 52 


5 


14 


_ 


_ 


12 
13 


26 49 


- 


3,333 00 


1,808 18 


640 00 


2 


/ 32 

I 92 
2,064 


} - 

665 


- 


14 


605 48 


- 


14,475 26 


14,593 59 


11,265 02 


9 


-3 


15 


1 79 


- 


14,397 82 


12,486 24 


6,417 37 


4 


/ 32 

I 640 


} - 


- 


16 


22,730 90 


7,044 32* 


63,867 68 


70,818 95 


35,360 45 


60 


179 


18 


_ 


17 


1,295 01 


- 


2,617 45 


2,690 89 


1,107 13 


_3 


12 


- 


- 


18 


151 25 


- 


2,715 92 


2,630 53 


1,981 07 


1 


_3 


_3 


_3 


19 


- 


- 


4,023 91 


4,149 46 


3,295 72 


2 


684 


35 


426 


20 


2,175 08 
399 12 


- 


7,232 94 

83 25 

4,818 67 


6,001 34 

72 00 
6,305 59 


2,903 19 
3,415 00 


3 
2 


12 

52 
351 


12 
100 


3 


21 
22 
23 


13 92 


- 


4,383 46 


4,560 69 


3,797 72 


2 


257 


_3 


-3 


24 


9,373 84 


125,000 00 4 


9,373 84 


2,726 66 


_3 


15 








25 


8,096 57 


13,387 01« 


8,096 57 


3,361 78 


480 00 


/ l 5 

I 1 

4 
10 
5 
4 
1 


} - 

13 

9 

1,039^ 

1,272 

430 


- 


_ 


26 


7,041 54 

21,318 64 

135 89 

2,651 43 

340 60 


3,833 544 
500 00 


7,698 54 
24,318 64 
3,643 82 
5,346 01 
4,991 52 


7,398 46 
26,511 16 
1,764 27 
6,034 01 
5,685 03 


3,038 50 

12,826 98 

352 10 

2,870 55 

1,200 00 


13 

7 
1.039 7 
1,229 
186 


_ 


27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


14 06 


- 


608 27 


681 52 


- 


- 


/ 62 
I 2 
3,878 


} - 

316 


_ 


32 


18,091 81 
12 39 


15,000 004 


166,672 29 
3,267 35 


160,009 93 
3,270 96 


77,286 96 
1,800 00 


96 
2 


S3 


33 

34 
35 


2,841 01 


23,129 87 


50,370 07 


46,063 33 


19,948 10 


16 


684 


24 


- 


36 


- 




454 59 


446 75 


- 


- 


_3 


-3 


_3 


37 



1 Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



6 Report not due. 



7 Animals. 



124 



P. D. 17. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Peal Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 

3 

4 
5 


Watertown 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 

for the Blind .... 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 

for the Blind (Kindergarten for the Blind) . 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 

for the Blind (Howe Memorial Press Fund) 
Watertown Associated Charities, The . 
Watertown District Nursing Association 


$2,861,029 27 

2,530,046 55 

288,153 34 

1,164 82 

17,878 30 


- 


$110 94 
3,580 27 


$70,877 16 

45,000 00 

10,339 49 

6,394 60 


6 


Watertown Home for Old Folks . 


96,257 13 


- 


2,330 72 


600 00 


; 


Webster 
Webster District Hospital (16 beds) . 


6,805 43 


- 


7,879 51 


277 29 


8 


Wellesley 

Convalescent Home of the Children's Hospital, 

The 


560,903 70 


_ 


44,475 52 


6,251 78 


9 


Wellesley Friendly Aid Association 


10,027 91 


- 


6,031 78 


2,363 00 


10 

11 


Wellesley Hospital Fund, Incorporated 
Wellesley Students' Aid Society, Inc., The 


72,995 37 
91,537 13 


- 


17,795 96 


1,230 15 
5,584 90 


12 


Westborough 
Kirkside Inc., The . .... 


82,310 00 


_ 


_ 


2,093 50 


13 


Westborough District Nurse Association " . 


642 86 


- 


1,190 76 


510 95 


14 


West Boylston 
Ladies Relief Corps of West Boylston, Mass., 
Inc. ....... 


2,500 00 


. 






15 


Westfield 
Noble Hospital, The Trustees of (108 beds) . 


465,474 87 


$74,000 00 


7,660 00 


64,629 12 


16 


Sarah Gillett Home for Aged People, The 


58,652 24 


- 


100 00 


6,208 39 


17 

18 


Shurtleff Mission to the Children of the Des- 
titute, The ...... 

Young Men's Christian Association of West- 
field, The 


122,401 10 
32,628 28 


17,500 00 


60 00 
10,756 00 


226 50 

2.361 19 


19 


Westford 
Ladies' Sewing Society and Women's Branch 
Alliance of the Unitarian Church 

Westport 


10,826 31 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Watuppa Grange, No. 365, Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, Incorporated .... 


13,353 36 


3,650 00 


619 50 


2,053 04 


21 

22 
23 


West Springfield 
American Home Makers, Incorporated . 
Springfield Goodwill Industries, Inc. 
West Springfield Neighborhood House Associa- 
tion ....... 


1,329 91 
95,262 76 


89,800 00 


4,999 99 
7.094 04 

16,996 25 


425 28 
23,061 04 


24 
2, r . 


Weymouth 
Weymouth Hospital (50 beds) 
Weymouth Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. . 


106,787 16 
2,333 63 


4,000 00 


3,155 53 


64,098 45 
3,161 18 


26 


Whitman 
Rogers Home for Aged Women 

WlLLIAMSTOWN 


34,852 28 


- 


811 00 


1,196 10 


27 


Williamstown Welfare Association 


7,120 06 


- 


7,673 85 


628 40 


28 
29 


WlNCHENDON 

Winchendon Boys Club, Inc. 
Winchendon Hospital, Incorporated 


17,424 84 
484 67 


- 


6,682 73 
620 00 


30 17 
174 50 


30 

31 


Winchester 
Home for Aged People in Winchester, The 
Winchester Visiting Nurse Association (oper- 
ating Winchester Hospital) (80 beds) 


113,510 70 
480,663 69 


68,000 00 


5,131 46 
3,445 00 


1,414 47 
95,427 85 



None. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



125 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities, 

and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$124,147 81 


$41,342 33 i 


$195,024 97 


$157,753 97 


$90,422 14 


115 


179 


7 




x 


110,758 66 


12,163 03 4 


155,758 66 


143,806 84 


72,932 57 


51 


122 


1 


- 


2 


16,605 40 

53 21 

623 53 


100 00 4 
2,000 00 


26,944 89 

164 15 

12,598 40 


24,057 89 

223 51 

10,599 09 


2,393 24 
8,006 59 


7 
8 


43 
7,138 


_3 

651 


- 3 


3 

4 
5 


4,492 04 


2,500 00 


9,922 76 


4,401 03 


1,391 47 


{ V 


} 5 


5 


" 


6 


66 89 


- 


14,954 94 


10,490 89 


4,132 12 


10 


318 


- 


" 


7 


24,413 88 


36,661 02 


111,802 20 


54,885 60 


31.029 89 


_3 


f 12 

1 435 


1 246 


- 


8 


124 49 


- 


8,519 27 


8,640 21 


4,530 00 


4 


/ I 2 
I 1.074 
40 
114 


J 419 


33 


9 


3,458 79 
4,470 61 


5,000 00* 


4,688 94 
27,851 47 


3,067 68 
24,666 78 


1.995 04 


1 


14 

_3 


- 


10 
11 


2,174 42 


- 


4,267 92 


3,643 13 


1,500 00 


2 


8 


2 


_ 


12 


20 42 


' 


2,271 88 


2,261 66 


1,487 75 


1 


/ I 2 
I 2,158 


J 452 


_3 


13 


- 


- 


374 83 


289 06 


50 00 


1 


_3 


_3 


_3 


L4 


9,204 37 


20,000 00 


101,493 49 


82,550 43 


32,416 09 


27 
I 5 


1,536 


25 


_ 


15 


1,938 42 


1,000 00 4 


8,278 26 


10,024 65 


3.328 00 


} " 


- 


- 


16 


6,625 08 


- 


6,911 58 


6,263 74 


2,171 05 


2 


12 


- 


- 


17 


105 00 


2,100 00 4 


13,222 19 


11,591 95 


6,200 28 


/ I 5 

I 5 


J 430 


- 


" 


IS 


472 50 


• 


472 50 


625 00 


- 


- 


8 


8 


" 


19 


6 07 


- 


2,678 61 


1.767 19 


142 00 


1 


/ 22 

1 


} - 


- 


20 


14 63 


- 


5,439 90 
26,340 10 


4,409 50 
31,598 60 


3,858 73 
17,732 39 


2 
35 


2,595 
86 


2,595 


: 


21 
22 


- 


- 


16,996 25 


16,474 09 


8,623 70 


5 


_3 


_3 


_3 


23 


126 18 


- 


64,224 63 
6,344 48 


67,548 95 
5,371 27 


31,240 42 
4,327 95 


27 
3 


1,288 
1,519 


_3 

886 


_3 


24 
25 


1,121 96 


385 84 


3,514 90 


2,604 02 


778 75 


2 


9 


9 


" 


26 


45 00 


- 


8.347 25 


7,645 65 


3,100 00 


3 


/ 112 

I 


} - 


-3 


27 


29 63 

224 78 


- 


6,742 53 
1,019 28 


7,232 11 
1,612 50 


4,959 24 


3 


465 


465 


r- 


28 
29 


3,034 87 


6,018 53 


15,599 33 


9,263 85 


4,649 35 


6 


16 


16 


- 


30 


7,438 46 


20,000 00 4 


119,341 31 


110,735 81 


42,891 80 


46 


1,715 


57 


~ 


31 



4 Restricted to capital. 



5 Paid officers. 



126 



P. D. If 

Abstracts of Reports of PrivaU 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



WlNTHROP 

Association of the Hawthorne Club 
Tifareth Israel Congregation of Winthrop 1 
Winthrop Community Hospital Aid Associa- 
tion, Incorporated, The .... 
Winthrop Community Hospital, Incorporated 

(34 beds) 

Winthrop Visiting Nurse Association Incorpo- 
rated ....... 

Winthrop Young Men's Hebrew Association 
Inc. ....... 

Woburn 
Home for Aged Women in Woburn 1 
Winning Home ...... 

Woburn Charitable Association (operating 
Charles Choate Memorial Hospital) (55 
beds) 1 ....... 

Young Men's Christian Association of Woburn, 
Mass., The ...... 

Worcester 
Angora Orphan Aid Association, The l . 
Associated Charities of Worcester, The . 

Association of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy 

Bais Hatveloh ..... 
Board of the Swedish Lutheran Old Peoples 

Home of Worcester, Mass., Inc., The 
Fairlawn Hospital, Inc. (45 beds) 
Fraternite Franco-Americaine, Worcester 

Branch, Inc. ..... 

Friendly House, Inc. . 

General Charles Devens Post Number 282 

Department of Massachusetts, The Amer 

ican Legion ..... 
Girls' League for Service, Inc. 

Girls Welfare Society of Worcester Inc. 

Guild of St. Agnes of Worcester, The 
Harpoot Assyrian United Association of 

America, The ..... 
Hebrew Free Loan Society, Inc. of Worcester 6 
Home Association for Aged Colored People 
Home for Aged Men in Worcester 
Home for Aged Women in the city of Worces- 
ter, The Trustees of the . 

Hopital Louis Pasteur (36 beds) . 

Italian American War Veterans Association 
Inc 

Jewish Home for Aged and Orphans of Worces- 
ter Mass., Inc. .... 

Lithuanian Charitable Society, The 

Little Franciscan Sisters of Mary 

Maironis Association Inc. x . 

Memorial Home for the Blind, The 

Memorial Hospital, The (215 beds) 

North Worcester Aid Society 

Odd Fellows Home of Massachusetts 

Osteopathic Clinic Association of New Eng- 
land, The 

Rest Home Association 

Rotary Club Education Fund of Worcester.The 

St. Anne's French Canadian Orphanage 

St. Vincent Hospital of Worcester, Massachu- 
setts, The (250 beds) .... 

Southern Worcester County Health Associa- 
tion, Incorporated ..... 

Temporary Home and Day Nursery Society, 
The 

United Jewish Charities, Inc., The 1 

Worcester Animal Rescue League 

Worcester Boys' Club .... 

Worcester Children's Friend Society 



$10,289 49 

991 84 

43,895 36 

802 16 



54,501 50 



42,412 76 



83,601 17 
320,263 93 

11,236 98 

142,831 28 
217,529 17 

22 09 
110 15 

504 98 
495 71 

27,253 45 
147,176 80 

8,142 31 

9,556 74 
450,082 85 

681,598 25 
40,987 60 

89 50 

60,919 17 

30,411 25 

490,348 40 

163,638 55 

1,868,951 37 

11,396 84 

724,322 07 

503 38 
55,549 65 

24,568 76 
356,273 52 

701,865 46 

27,204 62 

145,454 75 

25,921 20 
942,817 33 
362,139 58 



$5,000 00 



10,021 30 



6,500 00 



23,000 00 



18,750 00 



14,000 00 
175,000 00 



3,000 00 

14,350 00 

146,586 46 

135,000 00 

4,000 00 

5,000 00 



$2,108 00 


212 00 


1,643 00 


1,493 01 


200 00 


7,633 20 


56,379 09 


22,190 45 


1,381 03 


6,822 93 
7,432 66 


1,154 00 
4,400 00 


2,200 01 


11,035 00 


16,315 35 


70 00 


221 97 
1,031 25 


931 69 


2,412 60 


120 00 


23,413 88 
3,221 13 
11,696 23 


16,618 14 

26,659 00 

198 00 


60,623 81 


5,088 75 
3,364 75 
13,899 21 


34,442 34 


2,444 41 


9,707 50 


584 50 
40,100 00 
23,376 21 



None. 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



s Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



127 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 



Indi- 
viduals 
aided 

Free 



Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 



$5,000 00 4 



11,915 ll 4 
11,485 30 



2,300 00 4 



350 00 
1,000 00' 



250 00 4 

2,000 00 

500 00 



2,000 00 
3,810 00 



2,423 28 4 
6,100 00 



4,983 37 



5,396 01 4 



5,000 00 

2,165 00 
1,750 00 4 
1,000 00 



$2,164 22 


942 50 


40,987 41 


3,930 97 


200 00 


1,992 04 


8,368 23 


60,827 24 


61.303 56 


1,381 03 


14,370 45 
59,235 57 


1,154 00 
4,506 19 


185 57 
3,691 87 


13,963 24 


27,389 43 


1,037 78 


2,484 97 
36,226 42 


36,142 26 


22,142 86 


314 21 


25,616 84 

5,969 43 

68,233 86 


17,786 97 

315,904 80 

1,647 89 


81,157 51 


141 65 

17,874 03 

5,250 70 

49,153 46 


256,183 01 


26,258 94 


21,586 89 


5,436 20 
49,511 54 
57,178 57 



$2,269 94 


828 94 


41,718 89 


3,580 06 


200 00 


1,777 33 


7,912 74 


61,908 41 


33,600 84 


1,437 34 


15,032 93 
64,104 87 


1,254 00 
4,659 49 


570 83 
3,669 54 


13,729 93 


27,002 82 


2,933 12 


2,613 89 
19,063 86 


30,152 21 


21,052 50 


115 00 


20,410 42 

2,223 40 

43,842 61 


18,159 65 

314,303 80 

1,133 37 


70,663 59 


126 95 

17,439 44 

4,414 75 

49,695 37 


204,479 57 


22,951 54 


16,548 01 


2,853 01 
49,511 32 
57,586 35 



$596 98 


5 


17,805 93 


23 


3,120 00 


2 


5,414 48 


3 


14,840 23 


11 


4,254 69 


6 


70 90 


1 


4,184 80 
26,057 93 


5 
26 


2,732 89 


7 


1,503 00 


_3 


6,366 23 


6 


8,119 42 


17 


168 00 


1 


903 68 

7,628 31 


2 
9 


12,066 60 


{ £ 

12 


10,415 29 


8,647 31 


9 


7,492 70 


22 


7,494 73 
137,096 38 


9 
156 


25,144 91 


\ 33 


90 50 

7,248 52 

210 00 

14,546 98 


1 
11 

1 
32 


67,469 52 


100 


7,360 93 


4 


7,786 90 


10 


1,092 00 
11,025 63 
14,540 02 


3 

52 
9 



85 



975 
3,162 



1 s - 



14 

72 

487 

50 



1,251 

119 

745 



375 

_3 

202 
334 

122 

2,149 



44 
483 



49 
180 
453 

29 
14,452 
5 2 



54 

217 

5,509 

115 

142 
548 

4,486 

5,593 

227 



590 



120 
50 



1,557 



37 
150 
300 

1 
5,253 



111 



4 Restricted to capital. 



Paid officers. 



c Report not due. 



7 Animals. 



128 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 




Worcester — Con. 










1 


Worcester City Missionary Society, The 


$84,440 84 


- 


$1,563 26 


- 


2 


Worcester County Association for the Blind, 
Inc 


1,705 84 


_ 


578 00 


$2,294 02 


3 


Worcester Employment Society, The 


82,798 78 


- 


8,084 93 


8,068 20 


4 
5 
6 


Worcester Garden City, Inc. 

Worcester Girls Club House Corporation 

Worcester Hahnemann Hospital (120 beds) 


3 32 
85,331 48 
756,446 98 


$9,700 00 


3,800 00 
9,756 95 
1,528 48 


966 08 

115,790 88 


7 


Worcester Lions Club Charitable Corporation 


1,083 08 


- 


264 36 


1,268 85 


8 
9 

10 


Worcester Society for District Nursing 
Worcester Society for the Prevention of Cru- 
elty to Animals, The l 
Worcester Swedish Charitable Association 


234,244 60 
26,252 68 




59,481 97 
8,050 00 


36.645 62 
150 00 


11 


Worcester Womans Club .... 


120.057 60 


- 


10,380 00 


- 


12 
13 


Young Men's Christian Association of Worces- 
ter, The ...... 

Young Women's Christian Association of 
Worcester ...... 

Yarmouth 


994,528 49 
817,667 07 


25,000 00 
8,000 00 


64,629 95 
36,505 00 


88,581 87 
61,961 84 


14 


Friday Club, The ..... 


8,679 30 


- 


61 00 


369 39 


15 


South Yarmouth Woman's Club, Inc. . 
Headquarters Outside of Commonwealth 


2.732 93 


- 


179 67 


571 03 


16 


Albanian-American School of Agriculture 


99,174 79 


- 


35,105 37 


- 


17 


American Association of Hospital Social Work- 
ers, Inc. ...... 


6,115 76 


_ 


13,577 75 


360 39 


18 


American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


10,849,486 78 


- 


1,118,632 90 


10,060 00 


19 


American Peace Society .... 


4,345 45 


- 


13,731 72 


426 75 


20 
21 
22 


Boys' Club Federation of America 
Palou Reconstruction Union, The 
Woman's American Baptist Foreign Mission 
Society ....... 

Totals 


13,104 40 
5,940 00 

2,064,200 05 


- 3 


78,568 22 
650 00 

570,773 56 


981 39 
7,380 00 




$315,539,069 33 


$11,383,079 49 


$17,962,970 09 


$24,899,814 91 



- None. 

3 Total includes: 



1 No report. 
1,982,180 individuals, 



2 Organizations aided. 3 Not stated. 

528,052 animals, 106,542 visits, 9,850 memberships, 57,931 attendance. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



129 



Concluded. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 
Annuities, 
and Rentals 


Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 
aided 


Indi- 
viduals 
aided 
Free 


Families 

aided 
exclusive 
of Indi- 
viduals 




$3,107 64 


$3,500 00 


$8,386 23 


$5,038 09 


$4,383 70 


{ ¥ 


} 


80 


-' 


- 


1 


375 56 


- 


3,247 58 


6,860 99 


210 00 


2 


{ 


8 


-3 

} "• 


1 


2 


4,516 97 


1,000 00 4 


20,946 17 


21,688 01 


2,569 15 


4 


ll 2 
204 


19 


3 


1,660 58 
10,694 03 


43,002 47 4 


3,800 00 
12,126 66 
128,013 39 


3,850 00 
13,601 96 
137,026 19 


2.214 75 
8,043 95 
40,996 73 


1 

17 
49 


{ 


936 
1,302 
2,200 


-3 

55 
J 50 


- 


4 
5 
6 


- 


- 


1,533 21 


1,496 68 


- 


- 


3 2 
50 


103 


7 


11,352 55 


7,411 19« 


107,524 04 


110,789 35 


78,308 44 


55 




14,064 


7,173 


7,132 


8 


1 24 
6,843 62 


- 


8,201 24 
17,223 62 


8,295 81 
16,679 31 


200 00 
3,687 70 


25 

2 


/ 

I 


505 

212 

294 


} 294 


136 


9 
10 

11 


6,537 68 


500 00^ 


232,378 31 


228,403 87 


116.133 99 


90 




7,061 


_3 


- 


12 


19,761 84 


1,000 00" 


118,228 68 


108,871 96 


51,051 76 


54 




_3 


_3 


- 


13 


404 50 


_ 


834 89 


897 72 


_ 


_ 


J 

X 


9 2 

5 


} J 


1 


14 


130 00 


- 


974 36 


943 02 


69 58 


1 




72 




2 


15 


1,124 41 


- 


36,229 78 


35,338 28 


24.780 00 


20 




170 


_3 


- 


16 


79 96 


- 


14,018 10 


13,970 64 


6,647 90 


f is 

I 2 


} 


- 


- 


- 


17 


521,683 57 


120,473 50 


1,770,849 97 


1,743,493 46 


984,726 13 


60 

{ r 


} 


_3 


_3 


_3 


L8 


868 09 


- 


15,026 56 


22,427 18 


13,546 24 


- 


- 


- 


L9 


106 79 


- 


82,651 88 
650 00 


79,785 06 
60 00 


48,539 41 


16 




200 


_ 3 


3 


20 
21 


19,048 52 


18,500 00 


615,702 08 


633,710 06 


-3 


218 




_3 


-3 


_3 


22 


;9,872,161 80 


/ $3,251,256 06 4 
1 2,422,854 45 


$52,868,733 06 


$49,956,768 35 


$17,204,705 91 


/ 304' 
1 18,511 


7,9092 
2,684,5556 


\ 1,303,4027 


57,259 





4 Restricted to capital. 5 Paid officers. 

7 Total includes: 799,470 individuals, 503,780 animals, 152 visits. 



130 P. D. 17. 

Part III. 
THE CITY AND TOWN INFIRMARIES 

AND 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF 

Francis Bar dwell, Supervising Inspector of Infirmaries. 
Laws Relating to Infirmaries 

(General Laws, Chapter 4-7, as amended by Chapter 208, Acts of 1927.) 

For the information of boards of public welfare, superintendents of infirmaries, 
and others concerned, certain laws relating to infirmaries are here summarized. 

The Department of Public Welfare is required to visit annually all city and 
town infirmaries, and to include in its annual report a statement of their condition 
and management, with its suggestions and recommendations relative thereto. 
(General Laws, ch. 121, sect. 7.) 

The superintendent of every infirmary must keep a register, in the form prescribed 
by the Department of Public Welfare, of the names of the persons received or com- 
mitted, the cities or towns to which they belong, and the dates of their reception 
and discharge. (General Laws, ch. 47, sect. 8.) 

Every inmate of an infirmary able to work shall be kept diligently employed in 
labor. If he is idle and does not perform such reasonable task as is assigned, or if 
he is stubborn and disorderly, he shall be punished according to the orders and 
regulations established by the directors. (General Laws, ch. 117, sects. 21 and 
22. See also opinion of Attorney-General given to State Board of Charity, Novem- 
ber 21, 1904.) 

The only children who can be lawfully supported in a city or town infirmary for 
a period of more than two months are: (1) those who are so defective in body or 
mind as to make their retention in an infirmary desirable; (2) those w r ho are under 
two years of age ; and (3) those who are under three years of age, with mothers who 
are infirmary inmates and suitable persons to aid in taking care of them. In cases 
of failure of boards of public welfare to remove children illegally in infirmaries, the 
Department of Public Welfare is required to remove them and provide for them 
otherwise, at the expense of the city or town concerned. (General Laws, ch. 117, 
sects. 36-38.) 

Provision is made that tramps and vagrants, as well as criminals, shall be con- 
fined in separate and distinct quarters in all infirmaries and shall not be permitted 
to associate or communicate with other inmates. It should be noted also that 
tramps and vagrants, if physically able, shall perform labor of some kind, and 
shall be lodged under conditions prescribed by the State Department of Public 
Health. (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 20.) 

The Department of Public Welfare is authorized to advise with and assist local 
boards of public welfare in preparation of plans for infirmary buildings. (General 
Laws, ch. 121, sect. 38.) 

Inspection of Infirmaries 

As required by law, every infirmarj 7- has been visited once by the Department's 
inspector. Eighteen (18) have been visited twice, 5 three times, and 1 four times. 
Conferences have been held with various municipal officers — mayors of cities, 
local boards of public welfare, and special committees — and architects concerning 
matters of importance relative to the management and administration of infirm- 
aries or for the discussion of improvements or new construction. There are in 
Massachusetts one hundred and twenty-two (122) infirmaries which cared for 8,316 
inmates during the past municipal year. No infirmaries were closed during the 
year. 

Recommendations Made 

Ipswich. — That it is evident the time has come when the town must give careful 
consideration to one of two plans : either make extensive repairs and improvements 
on the present infirmary building or buy or build a new infirmary which should be 
located nearer the town and in a location which is more accessible. 



Pt. III. 131 

Quincy. — That as the present building is, and has been for some time, full to 
capacity, with many men sleeping in the third story, it would be advisable to 
consider a new building, preferably on a new location. 

Charlton. — That there is a most urgent need for hospital quarters. The present 
building is full and the third story in use. A hospital wing should be added. 

New Bedford. — That as the present building is housing all the men possible, it 
would be advisable to use a part, at least, of the contagious hospital which is located 
nearby and where there is ample room for at least forty men. This is a temporary 
arrangement and would save additional outlay pending the present unemploy- 
ment. 

Northbridge. — That electricity should be installed. 

North Adams. — That there is a need for better laundry equipment. 

Fitchburg. — That there should be a new floor laid and a general renovation of the 
kitchen, and that more modern laundry equipment is necessary. 

Construction — New and Contemplated 

Beverly. — Renovation and improvements have been completed; this includes a 
new oil-burning heater located outside of the building, a new roof, extra radiation 
and lights, complete plumbing renovation and additional bathrooms. 

Maiden. — The new infirmary building is completed at a cost of about $98,000. 
This is a fire-proof building one story high with marbleoid floors, oil-burning boilers, 
ample accommodation for 108 patients, and generous provision for all assistants. 
It is the first one-story building erected in the state as a municipal infirmary. 

Brockton. — To replace the main building which was destroyed by fire early in 
the year, a new two-story building has been erected. This building will house 72 
patients, and, together with the recently erected hospital building, makes the total 
capacity of the institution 98 patients. 

Leominster. — The new infirmary was completed early in the year and all patients 
moved. 

Dedham. — A hospital addition has been built and is being occupied. 

Watertown. — As the present site of the infirmary is needed for school purposes, 
it is proposed to move the present building to a lot on the same piece of land and 
north of the present location. An architect has been chosen and plans prepared. 
These plans show a new layout, with the kitchen on the first floor instead of in the 
basement as formerly. It is probable that work will begin early in 1931. 

Improvements 

Adams, new poultry house, new fencing, all buildings painted. Amesbury, new 
floors, walls and ceilings plastered, repairs at barn. Andover, new piazzas, interior 
and exterior painting. Athol, automatic fire extinguishers installed, some repairs 
and reshingling of roofs, minor repairs. Ayer, three new doorways built inside the 
house. Attleboro, house reshingled and painted. Barre, new roof on barn, stock 
barn remodeled, new house equipments. Billerica, chimney on main building, 
two rooms papered, a new floor and reinforced studding in barn. Bridgewater, a 
new heating plant and fire alarm system. Chelmsford, minor repairs to barn. 
Chicopee, a new gas oven. Clinton, new steam boiler installed. Cohasset, a new 
hen house and brooder house. Concord, new plumbing in kitchen and part of barn 
cellar cemented. Dartmouth, eighteen new storm sashes for windows on north 
and west sides of main building. Dedham, new hospital and bathrooms added at 
an expense of $10,225. Duxbury, shingled house walls, new windows and repairs 
to barn. Easthampton, new covered piazzas for warden and inmates, septic tank 
installed. Easton, painting and papering, new conductors, chimney rebuilt. 
Fairhaven, new steam boiler. Falmouth, new bathroom, one new floor, papering 
and painting. Fitchburg, reconstruction of building in rear of main plant in which 
eight new rooms have been built and equipped, a new heating plant installed and 
four new toilets installed in main house. Franklin, house painted. Georgetown,, 
roofs repaired. Greenfield, a new boiler, silo repaired, washroom and bathroom.. 
Groveland, new gutters and other minor repairs. Hanover, automatic fire alarm 
installed, also gas and water brought into house. Hanson, building painted outside 
and part of inside, cement steps front and back, new fire extinguishers. Harwich, 



132 P. D. 17. 

electricity installed. Haverhill, hot-water tank for laundry, painting of patients' 
and attendants' rooms, new steps to three entrances. Holliston, repairs to plumb- 
ing, improvements at stable. Holyoke, a new woodshed, new poultry house, new 
return pipes to steam plant, linoleum laid on main floor, plumbing and general 
repairs. Hudson, new septic tank and piping to bathrooms, repairs to chimney, a 
new fire-stop system, steel ceilings on three rooms, at barn, a milk room, and floors 
laid. Lawrence, hospital all newly painted, all roofs repaired, furniture repainted 
or renovated, improvements to grounds. Lancaster, improvements at barn. 
Lowell, addition to dormitory in male infirmary providing for 25 more beds, all 
wards and rooms repainted on female side of institution, new cement floor laid in 
one of men's dining rooms, general painting and renovation of all beds. Lynn, a 
large storage barn reshingled. Mansfield, electric refrigerator, painting buildings, 
changes in electric wiring. Marblehead, repairs to roof and heater, several rooms 
painted. Marlborough, weather stripping. Marshfield, buildings painted. Mat- 
tapoisett, shingling and barn repairs. Medf ord, screened in front piazza and ordin- 
ary repairs. Middleborough, barn roof repaired, new plumbing, new gutters, and 
repairs at barn. Milford, oil burner installed to steam heating plant, ordinary 
repairs. Milton, plumbing repairs. Natick, barn slringled and new bedding pur- 
chased. New Bedford, new roadways and walks, vegetable cellar, wards painted, 
new kitchen equipment including two electric refrigerators. Nantucket, painting 
within and without, repairs to plumbing, general repairs. Newbury port, interior 
painting. Newton, sprinkler system in basement, general repairs. North Adams, 
five new floors laid, many rooms painted and generally renovated, cement floors 
laid in cellar and boiler room; because of loss by fire of main barn, a smaller barn 
was built and additions added, the expense of this borne by insurance; gas service 
laid into buildings. North Attleborough, fire alarm system, inside and outside 
painting, shingling half of house, new sinks, repairs to floors, and general repairs. 
North Brookfield, improvement to water system, pressure tank, new equipment 
at barn. Northampton, barn and sheds painted, a new bathroom installed, steps 
and stairs repaired. North Andover, new stair treads, painting, repairs to heating 
system, new linoleum and electrical fixtures, repairs to barn roof. Norwell, repairs 
to plumbing, chimneys and ceilings, curbstones placed. Oxford, inside painting. 
Palmer, new roofs on barn and outbuildings, electric lights at barn and fruit cellar, 
fire alarm, painting. Peabody, a new bathroom, a sprinkler system in basement, 
kitchen addition, new laundry equipment, vegetable cellar, all at a cost of $4,200. 
Pittsfield, general plumbing and electrical equipment repairs. Plymouth, repairs 
to plumbing and ceilings, painting. Provincetown, alteration necessitated by in- 
stalling a fire escape, additional lights. Randolph, new fire escape, painting inside 
and out, general repairs. Rockport, painting, carpenter work, repairs to plumbing. 
Salem, new piazza on men's hospital, painting, and ordinary repairs. Saugus, 
steam heating system installed. South Hadley, steam heating plant, new floors, 
repairs at barn. Southb ridge, interior painting. Spencer, laundry improved, 
painting. Springfield, fire escapes built. Stoneham, new chimney built, house and 
garage shingled. Stoughton, inside painting. Sturbridge, repairs to water system, 
new kitchen equipment, repairs at barn. Southbridge, new bathroom installed for 
women inmates. Townsend, minor repairs. Uxbridge, electric pump and repairs 
to piping. Wakefield, outside sun porch and general repairs. Waltham, warden's 
bath renovated, new hot-water heater, barn shingled, laundry equipment. Ware- 
ham, house painted. Watertown, roof repaired, new sewers. Webster, buildings 
painted. Westborough, roofs repaired. Westfield, new bathroom, six rooms 
painted, some roofs repaired. Westport, shingling of porch and other repairs. 
Weymouth, painting. Winchendon, rewiring, house painted, new linoleum, new 
ceiling in front hall. Woburn, new wiring, three rooms painted, new timbers in 
house. Worcester, new electric refrigerator, repiping, new storehouse, flooring, 
painting. Wrentham, oil burner for kitchen range, new cement steps front and 
back, new bath tub, stair rails, roofs repaired, plumbing. 

Infirmary Visitors 
The infirmary visitors are local residents, giving their services under the Com- 
missioner's appointment. Those in office now are: Adams, Mrs. H. E. Davis; 
Amesbury, Mrs. George W. Crowther; Andover, Mrs. Frank L. Brigham; Athol, 



Pt. III. 133 

Miss Hattie M. French; Boston, Miss Theresa M. Lally; Charlton, Mrs. Edgar W. 
Preble; Easthampton, Mrs. George L. Munn; Easton, Mrs. Myrtle A. Spooner; 
Fall River, Mrs. Joseph E. Barre; Falmouth, Mrs. Alfred F. Kelley; Gloucester, 
Mrs. J. E. Anderson; Greenfield, Mrs. Henry F. Nash; Holyoke, Mrs. John M. 
James; Lancaster, Miss Mary Belle Bailey; Lawrence, Mrs. Lewis A. Foye; Maiden, 
Mrs. Harvey L. Boutwell, Mrs. Catherine A. Lovejoy, and Mrs. Ellen Woolfsan; 
Manchester, Mrs. George L. Porter; Marlborough, Mrs. L. H. Tourtellotte; Milton, 
Mrs. William H. Sias; Monson, Mrs. Herbert M. Smith; Montague, Mrs. Richard 
R. Lyman; Nantucket, Mrs. Josephine S. Brooks and Miss Ella F. Sylvia; Natick, 
Mrs. James E. White; Newburyport, Mrs. Frederick Tigh; Newton, Mrs. Winni- 
fred W. Hills and Mrs. Arthur W. Chamberlain; North Adams, Mrs. Lida A. Kim- 
ball and Miss lone Northrup; Northampton, Miss Clara C. Allen; North Attle- 
borough, Mrs. George A. Livingston; Pittsfield, Mrs. Southard and Miss Frances D. 
Robbins; Provincetown, Mrs. Ruth S. Snow; Randolph, Mrs. Daniel F. Flynn; 
Somerville, Mrs. Marguerite E. Kauler; Springfield, Mrs. Wendell S. Mowry and 
Mrs. Mildred T. Parsons; Ware, Mrs. Andrew Campion; Warren, Mrs. Edna 
Deland; Waltham, Mrs. Pryor Fulton; Winchendon, Mrs. John P. Bartlett and 
Mrs. Frank B. Spalter; Worcester, Miss Nellie E. Barrett and Mrs. Charles F. 
Darling. 

Reports from Infirmaries 

Tabulated information relating to the various infirmaries follows. There has 
been a reorganization of the Charlton Town Farm Association, twenty-four towns 
now being united in this joint infirmary. A list of these towns will be found in the 
tabulation. 



134 



P. D. 17 



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138 P. D. 17. 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 

Numbers Relieved. 

The following information covers public relief, whether rendered in institutions or 
outside, and aid rendered by all public agencies, whether State or local. 

The tables given below are arranged to show numbers relieved and their analysis 
by age, sex, and nativity. The tabulations are concluded by figures for cost of all 
relief. 

Table I shows the number supported or relieved by the several cities and towns 
during the year beginning April 1, 1929, and ending March 31, 1930. All persons 
are included, regardless of settlement. The total number receiving aid in any form, 
exclusive of vagrants and wayfarers, was 162,334. Of this number, 12,628 were 
aided in institutions and 149,706 — the remainder — outside, either in private 
families or in their own homes. Of the persons aided in institutions, 8,313 were 
relieved in the various city and town infirmaries, leaving 4,315 who were cared for 
in other institutions. It should be noted that certain cities which have city hos- 
pitals have not reported persons aided therein under "poor relief." To include 
these would add approximately 25,000 to the persons aided in "other institutions." 
Of the outside aid, 3,523 cases were aided in private families other than their own, 
while 146,183 were reported as having been aided in their own homes. This last 
figure comprises practically all city and town aid usually known as local public 
outdoor relief, including that under Chapter 118 of the General Laws. 

There is an increase of 270 over the preceding year in the number aided in insti- 
tutions, and an increase of 12,541 in the number aided outside. 

Table II supplies the same data for persons aided or relieved by the Common- 
wealth as are shown in Table I for local relief. In addition to aid rendered directly 
by the Commonwealth, this table includes also all those cases included in Table I, 
in which the relief has been rendered by cities and towns in the first instance and 
reimbursed by the Commonwealth as required by law. This table shows 39,281 
persons aided by the Commonwealth, an increase of 4,382 over 1929. Of this 
number, the aid in 34,467 cases was first rendered by the several cities and towns. 
The remaining 4,814 cases were aided by the Commonwealth; 3,731 of them at the 
State Infirmary; 173 in the Infirmary Ward at the State Farm; and 910 at the Mas- 
sachusetts Hospital School. 

Table III affords a rapid glance at the movement of population in the dependent 
group during the year under analysis. Thus it appears that 77,580 cases repre- 
sented approximately the total number of persons receiving aid April 1, 1929. 
About 79 per cent of these were receiving relief locally. During the year 89,568 new 
cases were admitted to relief; 26 per cent of this figure were aided either directly or 
through reimbursement by the Commonwealth. The persons who passed out of 
care during that same period number 65,788; viz., city and town cases, 48,929; 
state cases, 16,859. Those in this total released by death number 2,373, and 2,752 
persons were transferred. At the close of the year, therefore, the cities and towns 
had 78,938 persons in receipt of relief, and the Commonwealth had 22,422, making 
a total of 101,360. 

Table IV begins classification of the whole number of persons aided, and shows 
the analysis by color, nativity, and sex. Of the 167,148 persons so aided, 81,545 
were males and 85,603 females. The colored races furnished only 4,423 of the whole 
number. The native-born whites — 125,748 — number more than three times 
the foreign-born of the white races, the 36,187 of this latter group representing a 
proportionate increase of 5 per cent over last year. The females of the total native- 
born outnumber the males by only 1.4 per cent, while of the total foreign-born the 
females outnumber the males by 18.6 per cent. 

Table V gives a further interesting analysis of the native-born persons aided 
during the year classified by parent nativity. 

The parents of 47,272 were both native; 53,128 were children of foreign-born 
parents; 24,869 were of parents one of whom was foreign-born or unknown; while 
the nativity of parents in 4,346 cases remained unascertained. It appears, there- 
fore, that of the 167,148 persons receiving aid in Massachusetts in the year ending 
March 31, 1930, there were at least 89,852 who were either foreign-born or were of 
the first generation in our citizenship. 



Pt. III. 139 

By Table VI it appears that of the 167,148 cases aided, 16,389 were under five; 
73,114 were under fifteen; 91,276, or 54 per cent, including the above, were under 
twenty; 56,373, or 34 per cent, were between twenty and sixty; and 18,033, or 10.8 
per cent, were over that age. The ages of 1,466 were unknown. 

Among the poor persons relieved are always a considerable number of mental 
defectives who for one reason or another have not been committed and are therefore 
not cared for in the special institutions, such as the asylums for the insane, main- 
tained for that purpose. In regard to this class it is to be noted further that since 
no court has passed upon their mental condition, their classification here is made 
only because, in the opinion of the respective authorities making the returns, there 
is no doubt of their defect. Table VII affords a rough classification into three 
groups, according to the nature of the defect, and a division by sex. The total num- 
ber thus cared for was 331, namely, 203 males and 128 females. Two hundred 
eighty-seven (287) of these cases were relieved by the cities and towns; the remain- 
ing 44, having no settlement were aided at the expense of the Commonwealth. 
One hundred eighty-seven (187) of the whole number were classed as "insane," 
mostly the senile and mildly insane to be found in the infirmaries. This total in- 
cludes 116 males and 71 females. One hundred nine (109) were called "idiotic," 
namely 59 males and 50 females. The "epileptics" totaled 35, of whom 28 were 
males and 7 were females. 

Table VIII calls attention more pointedly to the sex and the nature of discharge 
from relief of those persons who passed out of aid during the year. Of the 65,788 
cases so dismissed, 33,632 were males and 32,156 were females. Forty-six per cent 
(46 per cent), or 30,307, were released to the care of relatives or friends. About 
4.1 per cent, or 2,752, of the whole number were transferred to other institutions, 
while 46 per cent of the aggregate were discharged without relatives or friends or 
other authorities agreeing to look after them. The great majority in this last 
group were persons assisted through illness, after which they became self-supporting 
again. 

As appears from Table IX the foreign-born who were receiving public relief during 
the year numbered 36,724, or 21.9 per cent of the entire number of persons aided. 
This percentage is 9.5 per cent less than the proportion of foreign born in the popu- 
lation generally, — 31.4 per cent. Canada furnished 10,234 of this number; 
England and Wales, 2,109; Germany, 325; Ireland, 6,525; Italy, 5,944; Russia and 
Poland, 3,444; Scandinavia, 480; Scotland, 698; and all other countries, 6,965. 

Table X shows the percentage of the various classes aided to the whole number 
relieved. Thus, of the 167,148 persons relieved, 76.50 per cent were settled cases, 
receiving their assistance out of local taxes; 23.50 per cent were unsettled, and 
though relieved by the respective cities and towns in the first instance in a majority 
of cases were ultimately aided out of the state tax. As to the place in which relief 
was given, 10.43 per cent of the total were aided in institutions, namely, 4.97 per 
cent in infirmaries, 2.88 per cent in state institutions; and 2.58 per cent in other 
institutions, mostly under private management. Outdoor relief, designated as aid 
"outside," was given in 89.57 per cent of all the cases. Most of these, namely 
87.46 per cent, were relieved in their own homes. Aid was given in private families 
other than the recipient's own — mostly boarded cases — in 2.11 per cent instances. 
Percentages of age show that 55.81 per cent were minors, 32.52 per cent were be- 
tween the ages of twenty-one and sixty, and 10.79 per cent were sixty or over. The 
ages of .88 per cent were unknown. Sexes differ slightly, males rating 48.79 per 
cent and females 51.21 per cent. 

The number of colored persons was very small, totaling only 2.65 per cent. 

By reason of thoroughgoing classification in the care of defectives, the percentage 
of those mentally deficient persons still cared for as poor relief cases is exceedingly 
small, and tends always to decrease. The mental condition of all the cases aided 
shows, on analysis, that 99.80 per cent were sane, .11 per cent were insane, .07 per 
cent were idiotic, and .02 per cent were epileptic. The proportion of sane persons 
in last year's returns was 99.79 per cent. 

It is of further interest to view at a glance the numerical relationship to the whole 
population of the persons relieved at public expense as appears in Table XI, which 
exhibits the number of each class in every thousand of the population of the Com- 
monwealth on a basis of the census of 1930. Thus it is shown that in each thousand 



140 P. D. 17. 

of the population there were 39.33 indigent persons relieved at public expense. Of 
these 19.19 were males and 20.14 were females. The native-born numbered 30.50 
in the thousand; foreign-born, 8.64; native-born of foreign parentage, 12.50; and 
those of unknown nativity, .19. The proportion of vagrants reported was 2.18 in 
the thousand. 

Cost of Poor Relief 

The funds laid out by the several cities and towns for all poor relief within their 
respective fiscal years are shown in Table XII. The aggregate is classified as 
"ordinary," or maintenance, and "extraordinary," or special. Together with the 
ordinary outlays are shown the receipts on account of maintenance, and the differ- 
ence, set out under "net ordinary expenditures." The ordinary outlay is classified 
as expenses in institutions and outside. The subdivision follows the classification 
in Table I regarding the nature and the place of aid. The grand total in Table XII 
shows that an aggregate of $13,768,986.77 was laid out by the several cities and 
towns. Of this sum, $13,416,479.49 was ordinary outlay, or maintenance; the 
remainder, or $352,507.28, was expended for sundry improvements, mostly at the 
city and town infirmaries. Of the money expended for maintenance, $2,391,175.63 
was expended for infirmary care and $997,573.94 for relief in other institutions. 
Care in private families took $576,048.03, and relief in the recipients' own homes, 
i.e., outdoor poor relief, totaled $8,691,359.77. The cost of administration, includ- 
ing salary and office expenses of the local public welfare boards, but exclusive of 
institution administration, came to $760,322.12. The total receipts on account of 
ordinary expenditures were $2,865,871.39 — classified as receipts on account of 
institutions, $355,896.93; and all other, $2,509,974.46. This latter portion of the 
receipts is made up mostly of reimbursements by cities and towns ultimately liable 
and from the state treasury in unsettled cases. Subtracting receipts leaves $10,550,- 
608.10 as the net ordinary outlay. 

In Table XIII the analysis shown for cities and towns by Table XII is carried 
out for cases aided out of the State funds. Of the $2,639,379.93 expended for this 
purpose, $2,581,310.21 was on account of ordinary expenditures, laid out as follows: 
At the State Infirmary, $485,768.09; at the State Farm, $36,517.76; at the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital School, $105,326.13, and all other expenditures outside of institu- 
tions, $1,953,698.23. Extraordinary expenditures totaled $58,069.72 — all ex- 
pended for special improvements at the several institutions just enumerated. 
Inasmuch as it is impossible to trace institution expenditures to the separate 
individuals receiving the aid, the figures set out under the State tables of cost are 
arrived at by taking from net cost of maintenance that proportion which the average 
number relieved in the institution bears to the average inmate population of the 
institution. 

In Table XIV State and local outlays are added, showing that of the $13,542,- 
495.13 expended for public poor relief, $13,131,918.31 was for ordinary outlays, of 
which $3,522,663.07 went for institutional relief and $9,609,255.24 was for relief 
outside. The total of extraordinary expenditures was $410,577.00. 



141 

Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 8 L 1930 













Aggregate 


In 


Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND TOWNS 




















In In- 


In Other 




In 


In 






Total 


firmary 


Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


Private 

Families 


Own 

Homes 


Abington . 


168 


8 


1 


7 


160 


10 


150 


Acton . 










13 


3 


1 


2 


10 


9 


1 


Acushnet . 










270 


9 


— 


9 


261 


11 


250 


Adams 










599 


18 


16 


2 


581 


12 


569 


Agawam . 










126 


7 


- 


7 


119 


5 


114 


Alford 










1 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


— 


Amesbury 










572 


26 


23 


3 


546 


- 


546 


Amherst . 










63 


7 


— 


7 


56 


3 


53 


Andovar . 










179 


17 


14 


3 


162 


6 


156 


Arlington . 










327 


— 


— 


— 


327 


24 


303 


Ashburnham l 










81 


8 


— 


8 


73 


8 


65 


Ashby 










10 


- 


- 


- 


10 


1 


9 


Ashfield 
Ashland . 










60 


4 


2 


2 


56 


8 


48 


Athol 










281 


21 


15 


6 


260 


17 


243 


Attleboro . 










634 


19 


13 


6 


615 


14 


601 


Auburn l . 










178 


1 


1 


— 


177 


10 


167 


Avon . 










52 


2 


- 


2 


50 


_ 


50 


Ayer . 










61 


8 


7 


1 


53 


_ 


53 


Barnstable 










391 


27 


23 


4 


364 


23 


341 


Barre 










28 


10 


7 


3 


18 


9 


9 


Becket 










4 


- 


— 


- 


4 


3 


1 


Bedford . 










17 


3 


— 


3 


14 




14 


Belchertown 










16 


— 


- 


- 


16 


3 


13 


Bellingham 










44 


4 


— 


4 


40 


_ 


40 


Belmont . 










72 


3 


- 


3 


69 


10 


59 


Berkley 










32 


— 


— 


- 


32 




32 


Berlin i 










25 


2 


— 


2 


23 


5 


18 


Bernardston 










18 


- 


— 


- 


18 


1 


17 


Beverly 










1,345 


92 


52 


40 


J ,253 


19 


1,234 


Billerica . 










120 


4 


4 


- 


116 


3 


113 


Blackstone 










96 


- 


— 


- 


96 


2 


94 


Blandford . 










16 


3 


- 


3 


13 


1 


12 


Bolton 










8 


1 


1 


— 


7 


2 


5 


Boston 










31,103 


1,984 


1,856 


128 


29,119 


1,141 


27,978 


Bourne 










49 


2 


— ■ 


2 


47 


2 


45 


Boxborough 










4 


3 


- 


3 


1 


_ 


1 


Boxford 










18 


2 


- 


2 


16 


1 


15 


Boylston >■ . 










2 


- 


- 


— 


2 


_ 


2 


Braintree . 










394 


33 


20 


13 


361 


15 


346 


Brewster . 










28 


3 


- 


3 


25 


2 


23 


Bridgewater 










182 


15 


4 


11 


167 


7 


160 


Brimfield . 










13 


- 


- 


_ 


13 


1 


12 


Brockton . 










2,807 


157 


146 


11 


2,650 


52 


2,598 


Brookfield » 










14 


1 


1 


— 


13 


1 


12 


Brookline . 










636 


24 


12 


12 


612 


2 


610 


Buckland . 










21 


- 


- 


- 


21 


7 


14 


Burlington 










12 


— 


- 


- 


12 


- 


12 


Cambridge 










5,441 


747 


146 


601 


4,694 


63 


4,631 


Canton 










88 


- 


— 


- 


88 


4 


84 


Carlisle 










1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Carver 










46 


1 


- 


1 


45 


6 


39 


Charlemont 










24 


1 


- 


1 


23 


6 


17 


Charlton L . 










17 


- 


- 


— 


17 


— 


17 


Chatham . 










24 


- 


- 


— 


24 


2 


22 


Chelmsford 










214 


9 


6 


3 


205 


5 


200 


Chelsea 










3,676 


450 


3 


447 


3,226 


12 


3,214 


Cheshire . 










21 


— 


— 


- 


21 


5 


16 


Chester 










16 


- 


- 


_ 


16 


3 


13 


Chesterfield 










- 


— 


- 


_ 








Chicopee . 










2,332 


122 


66 


56 


2,210 


20 


2,190 


Chilmark . 










- 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


Clarksburg 










39 


- 


- 


- 


39 


1 


38 


Clinton 










509 


27 


21 


6 


482 


24 


458 


Cohasset . 










98 


9 


7 


2 


89 


1 


88 


Colrain 










7 


2 


2 


- 


5 


1 


4 


Concord 










85 


8 


4 


4 


77 


8 


69 


Conway 










18 


1 


- 


1 


17 


4 


13 


Cummington 










10 


2 


- 


2 


8 


_ 


8 


Dalton 










80 


4 


3 


1 


76 


2 


74 


Dana l 










6 


1 


- 


1 


5 


1 


4 


Danvers 










343 


6 


- 


6 


337 


18 


319 


Dartmouth 










535 


31 


11 


20 


504 


7 


497 


Dedham 










439 


12 


12 


- 


427 


1 


426 


Deerfield . 










61 


2 


1 


1 


59 


10 


49 


Dennis 










35 


2 


- 


2 


33 


_ 


33 


Dighton 










67 


1 


- 


1 


66 


6 


60 



Charlton Home Farm Association. 



142 P. D. 17. 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending \ 
March 31, 1930 — Continued. 





Aggregate 


In 


Institutions 




Outside 




CITIES AND TOWNS 




















In In- 


In Other 




In 


In 






Total 


firmary 


Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


Private 
Families 


Own 
Homes 


Douglas 


37 


7 


6 


1 


30 


_ 


30 


Dover 










3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Dracut 










356 


1 


] 


— 


355 


- 


355 


Dudley 










152 


3 


— 


3 


149 


4 


145 


Dunstable 










6 


- 


- 


— 


6 


1 


5 


Duxbury . 










66 


8 


6 


2 


58 


4 


54 


East Bridgewater 








84 


9 


9 


- 


75 


- 


75 


East Brookfield l 








61 


3 


1 


2 


58 


3 


55 


East Longmeadow 








103 


- 


- 


- 


103 


- 


103 


Eastham . 








2 


- 


— 


— 


2 


- 


2 


Easthampton 










617 


23 


18 


5 


594 


2 


592 


Easton 










113 


6 


6 


- 


107 


1 


106 


Edgartown 










26 


4 


- 


4 


22 


3 


19 


Egremont . 










2 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Enfield 










11 


1 


- 


1 


10 


4 


6 


Erving 










40 


1 


1 


- 


39 


3 


36 


Essex 










13 


- 


— 


- 


13 


2 


11 


Everett 










1,993 


24 


- 


24 


1,969 


47 


1,922 


Fairhaven 










530 


23 


5 


18 


507 


5 


502 


Fall River 










9,413 


589 


429 


160 


8,824 


7 


8,817 


Falmouth . 










208 


7 


6 


1 


201 


2 


199 


Fitchburg . 










3,387 


155 


71 


84 


3,232 


32 


3,200 


Florida 










7 


- 


- 


- 


7 


2 


5 


Foxborough 










126 


3 


- 


3 


123 


6 


117 


Framingham 










689 


34 


22 


12 


655 


2 


653 


Franklin . 










45 


10 


10 


- 


35 


- 


35 


Freetown . 










22 


- 


- 


- 


22 


4 


18 


Gardner 










607 


44 


30 


14 


563 


6 


557 


Gay Head 










2 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Georgetown 










19 


3 


2 


1 


16 


2 


14 


Gill . 










7 


1 


- 


- 


6 


3 


3 


Gloucester. 










1,246 


82 


78 


4 


1,164 


1 


1,163 


Goshen 










2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


<j-osnold 










- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


— 


Grafton 










129 


6 


5 


1 


123 


6 


117 


Granby 










1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


Granville . 










1 


1 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


Great Barringtc 


>n 








128 


3 


— 


3 


125 


26 


99 


Greenfield 










339 


33 


15 


18 


306 


6 


300 


Greenwich . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


- 


Groton 












23 


3 


— 


3 


20 


1 


19 


Groveland 












29 


4 


2 


2 


25 


1 


24 


Hadley 












62 


3 


1 


2 


59 


- 


59 


Halifax 












- 


— 


- 


— 


- 


— 


- 


Hamilton 












36 


1 


— 


1 


35 


— 


35 


Hampden 












4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


3 


Hancock 












2 


- 


- 


— 


2 


1 


1 


Hanover 












49 


5 


5 


- 


44 


5 


39 


Hanson 












42 


6 


6 


- 


36 


- 


36 


Hardwick l 












46 


2 


2 


- 


44 


2 


42 


Harvard 












16 


1 


- 


1 


15 


4 


11 


Harwich 












52 


6 


6 


- 


46 


5 


41 


Hatfield 












14 


6 


- 


6 


8 


— 


8 


Haverhill 












4,568 


1,160 


182 


978 


3,408 


i 


3,401 


Hawley 












10 


- 


- 


- 


10 


1 


9 


Heath 












3 


1 


1 


- 


2 


2 


- 


Hingham 












123 


12 


8 


4 


111 


6 


105 


Hinsdale 












21 


— 


— 


- 


21 


- 


21 


Holbrook 












18 


- 


— 


- 


18 


2 


16 


Holden * 












61 


16 


- 


16 


45 


1 


44 


Holland 1 












1 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Holliston 












65 


15 


15 


- 


50 


- 


50 


Holyoke 












3,067 


367 


291 


76 


2,700 


8 


2,692 


Hopedale 












40 


- 


- 


- 


40 


3 


37 


Hopkinton 










29 


2 


- 


2 


27 


1 


26 


Hubbardston l 










32 


1 


— 


1 


31 


— 


31 


Hudson 










279 


13 


11 


2 


266 


— 


266 


Hull . 










43 


5 


- 


5 


38 


6 


32 


Huntington 










11 


- 


- 


- 


11 


1 


10 


Ipswich 










257 


10 


9 


1 


247 


2 


245 


Kingston . 










119 


4 


- 


4 


115 


13 


102 


Lakeville . 










14 


- 


— 


- 


14 


3 


11 


Lancaster . 










46 


3 


- 


3 


43 


- 


43 


Lanesborough 










15 


- 


— 


- 


15 


1 


14 


Lawrence . 










4,455 


606 


591 


15 


3,849 


39 


3,810 


Lee 










85 


4 


- 


4 


81 


5 


li 


Leicester 1 . 










312 


4 


4 




308 


2 


306 



Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Pt. III. 143 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 81, 1930 — Continued. 







In 


Institutions 




Outside 




CITIES AND TOWN 


Aggregate 




















In In- 


In Other 




In 


In 






Total 


firmary 


Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


Private 
Families 


Own 
Homes 


Lenox 


87 


4 


_ 


4 


83 


2 


81 


Leominster 








1,007 


47 


36 


11 


960 


13 


947 


Leverett . 








29 


2 


- 


2 


27 


1 


26 


Lexington . 








134 


14 


7 


7 


120 


3 


117 


Leyden 








2 


- 


- 


— 


2 


2 


- 


Lincoln 








8 


2 


— 


2 


6 


1 


5 


Littleton . 








16 


- 


- 


- 


16 


2 


14 


Longmeadow . 








15 


2 


— 


2 


13 


1 


12 


Lowell 








7,673 


818 


687 


131 


6,855 


15 


6,840 


Ludlow 








316 


4 


- 


4 


312 


11 


301 


Lunenburg 








6 


- 


- 


- 


6 


2 


4 


Lynn . 








4,084 


175 


152 


23 


3,909 


58 


3,851 


Lynnfield . 








3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


— 


3 


Maiden 








1,196 


139 


84 


55 


1,057 


20 


1,037 


Manchester 








25 


3 


3 


- 


22 


— 


22 


Mansfield . 








148 


21 


15 


6 


127 


1 


126 


Marblehead 








237 


18 


18 


- 


219 


6 


213 


Marion 








40 


— 


— 


- 


40 


1 


39 


Marlborough . 








889 


74 


59 


15 


815 


42 


773 


Marshfield 








43 


8 


8 


- 


35 


2 


33 


Mashpee . 








43 


- 


- 


- 


43 


10 


33 


Mattapoisett . 








63 


6 


4 


2 


57 


- 


57 


Maynard . 








246 


1 


1 


— 


245 


3 


242 


Medfield . 








22 


4 


- 


4 


18 


4 


14 


Medford . 








977 


32 


24 


8 


945 


3 


942 


Medway . 








94 


— 


— 


- 


94 


4 


90 


Melrose 








298 


17 


- 


17 


281 


27 


254 


Mendon . 








16 


- 


- 


- 


16 


2 


14 


Merrimac . 








82 


5 


- 


5 


77 


6 


71 


Methuen . 








668 


22 


12 


10 


646 


1 


645 


Middleborough . 








369 


37 


30 


7 


332 


21 


311 


Middlefield 








1 


1 


- 


1 


— 


- 


- 


Middleton 








31 


— 


— 


— 


31 


5 


26 


Milford . 








492 


57 


51 


6 


435 


12 


423 


Millbury l . 








388 


12 


- 


12 


376 


12 


364 


Millis 








17 


- 


— 


- 


17 


— 


17 


Millville . 








39 


3 


1 


2 


36 


3 


33 


Milton 








79 


16 


5 


11 


63 


5 


58 


Monroe 








- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


- 


Monson 








88 


9 


9 


- 


79 


1 


78 


Montague 








146 


19 


10 


9 


127 


6 


121 


Monterey . 








J 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


Montgomery . 








2 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Mount Washington 








- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Nahant 








17 


2 


- 


2 


15 


- 


15 


Nantucket 








49 


10 


10 


- 


39 


3 


36 


Natick 








523 


20 


20 


- 


503 


24 


479 


Needham . 








106 


3 


1 


2 


103 


11 


92 


New Ashford . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


New Bedford . 








6,808 


483 


380 


103 


6,325 


78 


6,247 


New Braintree l 








8 


- 


— 


- 


8 


- 


8 


New Marlborough 








18 


- 


- 


- 


18 


2 


16 


New Salem 








13 


2 


— 


2 


11 


1 


10 


Newbury . 








24 


1 


- 


1 


23 


2 


21 


Newburyport 








458 


59 


59 


- 


399 


- 


399 


Newton 








762 


27 


22 


5 


735 


6 


729 


Norfolk 








30 


3 


- 


3 


27 


1 


26 


North Adams . 








938 


93 


43 


50 


845 


— 


845 


North Andover 








139 


22 


5 


17 


117 


10 


107 


North Attleborough 








428 


28 


23 


5 


400 


14 


386 


North Brookfield 








113 


7 


7 


- 


106 


6 


100 


North Reading. 








59 


3 


- 


3 


56 


9 


47 


Northampton . 








837 


57 


48 


9 


780 


1 


779 


Northborough . 








60 


1 


- 


1 


59 


9 


50 


Northbridge 








539 


30 


14 


16 


509 


1 


50S 


Northfield 








43 


- 


- 


- 


43 


6 


37 


Norton 








56 


— 


— 


- 


56 


4 


52 


Norwell 








13 


4 


4 


— 


9 


4 


5 


Norwood . 








250 


14 


4 


10 


236 


19 


217 


Oak Bluffs 








64 


1 


_ 


1 


63 


4 


59 


Oakham . 








1 


1 


_ 


1 


- 


— 


— 


Orange 








115 


4 


1 


3 


Ill 


14 


97 


Orleans 








16 


- 


_ 


- 


16 


1 


15 


Otis . 








3 


- 


— 


- 


3 


2 


1 


Oxford 








149 


20 


19 


1 


129 


- 


129 


Palmer 








293 


25 


16 


9 


268 


12 


256 


Paxton > 








29 


3 


~ 


3 


26 


1 


25 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



144 



p. D. 1: 



T t Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

1 ABL March 31 ,1930 — Continued. 











Aggregate 


In Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND TOWNS 


In In- In Other 


In 


In 






Total firmary Insti- 


Total Private 


Own 






tutions 


Families 


Homes 




638 


54 4? 7 


584 4 


580 


Peabody 


18 


2-2 


16 


16 


Pelham 


12 


7 2 5 


5 1 


4 


Pembroke . 






85 




85 1 


84 


Pepperell . 








_ 






Peru . 








7 
26 


_ _ _ 


7 4 


3 


Petersham . 








2-2 


24 1 


23 


Phillipston 
Pittsfield . 








1,809 


227 100 127 


1,582 16 


1,566 


Plainfield . 








13 


2-2 


11 


11 


Plain ville . 








488 


lu 16 


472 2 


470 


Plymouth . 








10 




10 1 


9 


Plympton . 








1 


_ _ 


1 


1 


Prescott . 








2 
41 


_ _ _ 


2 


2 


Princeton 1 








8 7 1 


33 


33 


Provincetown . 








814 


08 54 4 


756 3 


753 


Quincy 








119 


13 13 


106 1 


105 


Randolph . 








46 


2-2 


44 3 


41 


Raynham . 








234 


3-3 


231 18 


213 


Reading . 








22 


3-3 


19 6 


13 


Rehoboth . 








823 
5 




823 42 


781 


Revere 








_ - - 


5 


5 


Richmond 








24 


1 - 1 


23 3 


20 


Rochester . 








280 


12 12 


268 18 


250 


Rockland . 








100 


9 9- 


91 2 


89 


Rockport . 








4 




4 2 


2 


Rowe 








49 


_ _ 


49 


49 


Rowley 








47 


_ _ _ 


47 11 


36 


Royalston . 








13 


1 - 1 


12 5 


7 


Russell 








44 


2 2- 


42 


42 


Rutland 1 . 








4,202 


158 109 49 


4,044 17 


4,027 


Salem . 








77 

1 

67 

409 


4-4 


73 5 


68 


Salisbury . 










1 1 




Sandisfield 








_ - - 


67 1 


66 


Sandwich . 








13 4 9 


396 16 


380 


Saugus 








5 


1 - 1 


4 


4 


Savoy 








95 
67 
27 
11 
11 
19 
64 

241 
18 

296 
2,479 

197 


2-2 


93 2 


91 


Scituate . 








1-1 


66 1 


65 


Seekonk . 










27 2 


25 


Sharon 








— - — 


11 5 


6 


Sheffield . 








_ _ _ 


11 3 


8 


Shelburne . 








1 1 


18 5 


13 


Sherborn . 








6 5 1 


58 


58 


Shirley 








11- 


240 4 


236 


Shrewsbury 








11- 


17 


17 


Shutesbury 








6 4 2 


290 1 


289 


Somerset . 








244 70 174 


2,235 43 


2,192 


SomervilVe 








15 7 8 


182 


182 


South Hadtey 












- 


Southampton 








30 

839 

37 

154 

4,855 

20 

26 

187 

131 

17 

56 

19 

17 

153 

135 

53 

1,461 

79 

34 

11 


_ _ _ 


30 5 


25 


Southborough 








25 17 8 


814 11 


803 


Southbridge 








7-7 


30 . 2 


28 


Southwick 








19 17 2 


135 6 


129 


Spencer 








910 804 106 


3,945 33 


3,912 


Springfield 








4-4 


16 1 


15 


Sterling l . 










26 1 


25 


Stockbridge 








22 21 1 


165 5 


160 


Stoneham . 








14 11 3 


117 9 


108 


Stoughton 








11- 


16 2 


14 


Stow . 








7 5 2 


49 1 


48 


Sturbridge. 








3-3 


16 1 


15 


Sudbury . 










17 


17 


Sunderland 








8 7 1 


145 2 


143 


Sutton 








5 4 1 


130 6 


124 


Swampscott 










53 2 


51 


Swansea . 
Taunton . 








99 84 15 


1,362 13 
79 


1,349 
79 


Templeton 








1-1 


33 


33 


Tewksbury 








1-1 


10 1 


9 


Tisbury . 












- 


Tolland . 








20 

35 

6 


2-2 


18 5 


13 


Topsfield . 








8 6 2 


27 2 


25 


Townsend 








1-1 


5 - 


5 i 


Truro 










30 


30 


Tyngsborough 








30 


~ ~ _ 




- 


Tyringham 








19 


4 4 


15 


15 


Upton 








t 












j. T.T ,-* ■r*-» a XT'-ifm A ccrvr*ia t ir\n 







Pt. III. 

Table I. 



145 

Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 81, 1930 — Concluded. 















Aggregate 


In 


Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND TOWNS 




















In In- 


In Other 




In 


In 






Total 


firmary 


Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


Private 
Families 


Own 

Homes 


Uxbridge 


201 


19 


19 


_ 


182 


- 


182 


Wakefield 












270 


15 


15 


- 


255 


2 


253 


Wales . 












9 


2 


- 


2 


7 


- 


7 


Walpole 












119 


7 


- 


7 


112 


17 


95 


Waltham 












1,114 


98 


55 


43 


1,016 


- 


1,016 


Ware . 












169 


10 


9 


1 


159 


5 


154 


Wareham 












207 


9 


8 


1 


198 


9 


189 


Warren ' 












144 


15 


11 


4 


129 


3 


126 


Warwick 












2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Washington 










- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


Watertown 










850 


30 


14 


16 


820 


40 


780 


Wayland . 










63 


1 


1 


- 


62 


- 


62 


Webster 












645 


29 


28 


1 


616 


1 


615 


Wellesley 












59 


- 


- 


- 


59 


7 


52 


Wellfleet 












13 


1 


1 


- 


12 


6 


6 


Wendell 












40 


- 


- 


- 


40 


4 


36 


Wenham 












6 


— 


— 


- 


6 


— 


6 


West Boylston l 








45 


2 


- 


2 


43 


- 


43 


West Bridgewater 








40 


3 


2 


1 


37 


o 


35 


West Brookfield 1 








23 


4 


1 


3 


19 


1 


18 


West Newbury. 








29 


— 


— 


— 


29 


4 


25 


West Springfield 








600 


4 


- 


4 


596 


18 


578 


West Stockbridge 








24 


1 


- 


1 


23 


2 


21 


West Tisbury . 








1 


- 


— 


- 


1 


1 


- 


Westborough 










202 


10 


6 


4 


192 


— 


192 


Westfield . 










617 


45 


29 


16 


572 


6 


566 


Westford . 










91 


11 


6 


5 


80 


1 


79 


Westhampton 










2 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


Westminster l 










39 


2 


2 


— 


37 


9 


28 


Weston 










13 


1 


— 


1 


12 


2 


10 


Westport . 










129 


9 


8 


1 


120 


1 


119 


Westwood 










10 


2 


— 


2 


8 


— 


8 


Weymouth 










965 


24 


24 


— 


941 


24 


917 


Whately . 










21 


6 


1 


5 


15 


2 


13 


Whitman . 










133 


12 


— 


12 


121 


18 


103 


Wilbraham 










130 


- 


— 


— 


130 


5 


125 


Williamsburg 










41 


1 


- 


1 


40 


4 


36 


Williamstown 










88 


- 


— 


- 


88 


12 


76 


Wilmington 










204 


1 


- 


1 


203 


2 


201 


Winchendon 










416 


44 


23 


21 


372 


12 


360 


Winchester 










376 


4 


2 


2 


372 


17 


355 


Windsor 










1 


1 


1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


Winthrop . 










131 


12 


9 


3 


119 


14 


105 


Woburn 










707 


35 


35 


— 


672 


3 


669 


Worcester 










7,604 


313 


301 


12 


7,291 


379 


6,912 


Worthington 










9 


1 


- 


1 


8 


— 


8 


Wrentham 










26 


12 


9 


3 


14 


1 


13 


Yarmouth 










77 


- 


- 


- 


77 


7 


70 


Grand total 


162,334 2 


12,628 


8,313 


4,315 


149,706 


3,523 


146,183 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 

2 Added to this number will be 4,814 aided in State institutions shown in Table II. 



146 P. D. 17. 

Table II. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by the State in Insti- 
tutions, in Private Families, and in their Own Homes, during the Year ending 
March 31, 1930. 

Aggregate 39,281 

In institutions: 

Total - 6,324 

State Infirmary 3,731 

Infirmary Ward, State Farm 173 

Massachusetts Hospital School 910 

Town or City Infirmary 513 

Other institutions 997 

Outside: 

Total 32,957 

Private families 260 

Own homes 32,697 



Table III. — Movement during the Year ending March 31, 1930, of the Poor 

Supported or Relieved. 

Cities 

Source of Support or Relief and State Total 

Towns 

Number supported or relieved April 1, 1929 61,559 16,021 77,580 

Number admitted to support or relief during